Reviews in Pediatric Dermatology

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Dermatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 November 2023) | Viewed by 4050

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be a collection of comprehensive, up-to-date reviews from experts in the field on topics of “Pediatric Dermatology” addressing all clinical, experimental, epidemiological, and public health aspects of the broad spectrum of skin diseases in children and adolescents.

This includes the review of clinical, experimental, environmental, behavioral, chemical, and genetic data originating from different sources, such as, for example, clinical trials, laboratory investigations, observational epidemiological studies, public health surveys, and governmental/public registers, and their association to dermatological outcomes such as, for example, skin cancer, allergic contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and other skin diseases. Reviews of methodological  aspects related to skin health in children from related fields such as biostatistics, epidemiology, data science, bioinformatics, and mathematics are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Olaf Gefeller
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skin diseases
  • skin health
  • skin cancer
  • allergic contact dermatitis
  • atopic dermatitis
  • other skin diseases
  • pediatric dermatology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 479 KiB  
Article
The Effect of House Dust Sensitization on Skin Sebum and Moisture in Children with Allergic Respiratory Diseases
by Uğur Altaş, Zeynep Meva Altaş, Nazlı Ercan and Mehmet Yaşar Özkars
Children 2023, 10(9), 1483; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10091483 - 30 Aug 2023
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Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the levels of skin moisture and sebum in children with a house dust allergy without skin symptoms. This was a case–control study involving children, aged 0–18 years, who were being followed up for an allergic airway disease in [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the levels of skin moisture and sebum in children with a house dust allergy without skin symptoms. This was a case–control study involving children, aged 0–18 years, who were being followed up for an allergic airway disease in a pediatric allergy clinic. Age, gender, hemogram parameters, and IgE values were evaluated. The skin moisture and sebum percentages of the patients and control group were measured by a non-invasive bioimpedance method using a portable digital skin moisture and sebum measurement device on the cubital fossa. The median value of the skin moisture percentage in the house dust mite allergy-positive patient group was significantly lower than that in the house dust mite allergy-negative patients and the control group (p < 0.001). The house dust mite allergy-positive patient group had the lowest skin sebum content. However, there was no statistical significance among the groups in terms of skin sebum percentage (p = 0.102). In the study, children with a house dust allergy were found to have lower levels of skin moisture and sebum. The regular use of moisturizers for children with a house dust allergy should be kept in mind as an effective solution to protect the skin barrier and reduce skin symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews in Pediatric Dermatology)
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7 pages, 680 KiB  
Case Report
Extensive and Persistent Dermal Melanocytosis in a Male Carrier of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIC (Sanfilippo Syndrome): A Case Report
by Maurizio Romagnuolo, Chiara Moltrasio, Serena Gasperini, Angelo Valerio Marzano and Stefano Cambiaghi
Children 2023, 10(12), 1920; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10121920 - 13 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Congenital dermal melanocytosis (DM) represents a common birthmark mainly found in children of Asian and darker skin phototype descent, clinically characterized by an oval blue-grey macule or macules, commonly located on the lumbosacral area. In rare DM cases, when presenting with diffuse macules [...] Read more.
Congenital dermal melanocytosis (DM) represents a common birthmark mainly found in children of Asian and darker skin phototype descent, clinically characterized by an oval blue-grey macule or macules, commonly located on the lumbosacral area. In rare DM cases, when presenting with diffuse macules persisting during the first years of life, it could represent a cutaneous feature of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Extensive congenital DM is actually associated with Hurler syndrome (MPS type I) and Hunter syndrome (MPS type II), although several reports also described this association with MPS type VI and other lysosomal storage disorders (LySD), including GM1 gangliosidosis, mucolipidosis, Sandhoff disease, and Niemann–Pick disease. Here, we present the case of a two-year-old boy presenting with extensive dermal melanocytosis, generalized hypertrichosis, and chronic itch, harboring a heterozygous variant of uncertain significance, NM_152419.3: c.493C>T (p.Pro165Ser), in the exon 4 of HGSNAT gene, whose mutations are classically associated with MPS IIIC, also known as Sanfilippo syndrome. This is the first report that highlights the association between extensive congenital DM and MPS type IIIC, as well as a pathogenetic link between heterozygous LySD carrier status and congenital DM. We speculate that some cases of extensive congenital DM could be related to heterozygous LySD carriers, as a manifestation of a mild clinical phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews in Pediatric Dermatology)
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9 pages, 1755 KiB  
Case Report
Severe Pemphigus Vulgaris Resistant to Conventional Therapies and with Hypersensitivity to Rituximab in a 12-Year-Old Child
by Maria Beatrice De Felici Del Giudice, Carolina Calanca, Chiara Sassetti, Carlo Caffarelli, Claudio Feliciani and Susanna Esposito
Children 2023, 10(6), 920; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10060920 - 24 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1447
Abstract
Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially lethal blistering disease typically occurring in adulthood and characterized by autoantibodies directed against mucocutaneous desmosomal proteins. Clinically, flaccid vesicles, bullae and erosions after breakage are the main clinical features. According to the literature, the incidence of [...] Read more.
Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare, potentially lethal blistering disease typically occurring in adulthood and characterized by autoantibodies directed against mucocutaneous desmosomal proteins. Clinically, flaccid vesicles, bullae and erosions after breakage are the main clinical features. According to the literature, the incidence of PV is rare in the pediatric population, ranging from 1 to 4% of reported cases. We describe an interesting case of a 12-year-old boy with severe PV that was referred to our university hospital for a mucocutaneous disease resistant to anti-infective therapy. Following the appearance of bullous lesions on the skin, antibody screening for autoimmune diseases showed positivity for PV and corticosteroid therapy was started. In view of the numerous adverse effects, we decided to set up biological therapy with rituximab, which was interrupted due to the onset of an urticarial reaction. Further second-line therapies were therefore attempted, with only a partial response. For this reason, a desensitizing therapy with rituximab was decided, thus allowing a clear improvement in the clinical picture and quality of life of the patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a child with severe PV resistant to conventional therapies and with an urticarial reaction to rituximab. This case highlights that despite PV being extremely rare in the pediatric population, this diagnosis should not be entirely discounted. In case of severe clinical manifestations, rituximab represents a valid option in children and desensitization tests should be recommended in the presence of hypersensitivity to this drug. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews in Pediatric Dermatology)
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