Research on Pediatric Trauma Surgery

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 July 2023) | Viewed by 2846

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Direktor der kinderchirurgischen Klinik, Städt.Klinikum, Moltkestraße 90, D-76133 Karlsruhe, Germany
2. Director Department of Pediatric Surgery, Karlsruhe City Hospital, Moltkestraße 90, 76133 Karlsruhe, Germany
Interests: pediatric surgery; pediatric trauma surgery; pediatric minimally invasive surgery

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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 20A, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: pediatric surgery; pediatric trauma surgery; pediatric minimally invasive surgery

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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric Surgery, University Children's Hospital Basel (UKBB), 4056 Basel, Switzerland
Interests: pediatric surgery; pediatric trauma; injury prevention in children; ultrasound imaging; damage control; multiple injuries; pediatric fractures; pediatric joint dislocations; implants for children; compartment syndrome; polytrauma
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite effective preventive measures, injury continues to be the leading cause of death and disability in children older than one year of age. The spectrum of injury causes varies with age, and blunt forces cause the majority of injuries. For this Special Issue, current research topics on various aspects of pediatric trauma are welcome. Our aim is to present and discuss the latest developments in the management of thoracic and abdominal trauma, head injury, orthopedic trauma, including spine and pelvic injury, non-accidental trauma, and minimally invasive techniques to treat trauma patients. Manuscripts pertaining to patient management in the prehospital state and the trauma bay, as well as contributions dealing with anesthesiologic aspects of pediatric trauma care, are also welcome.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Peter P. Schmittenbecher
Dr. Peter Zimmermann
Prof. Dr. Johannes Mayr
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric trauma
  • pediatric thoracic trauma
  • pediatric abdominal trauma
  • solid organ injury
  • pediatric head injury
  • pediatric orthopedic trauma
  • non-accidental trauma

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1167 KiB  
Article
Pediatric Trauma and Trauma Team Activation in a Swiss Pediatric Emergency Department: An Observational Cohort Study
by Anouk Herren, Cameron S. Palmer, Markus A. Landolt, Markus Lehner, Thomas J. Neuhaus and Leopold Simma
Children 2023, 10(8), 1377; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10081377 - 11 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Background. Trauma is one of the most common causes of death in childhood, but data on severely injured Swiss children are absent from existing national registries. Our aim was to analyze trauma activations and the profiles of critically injured children at a tertiary, [...] Read more.
Background. Trauma is one of the most common causes of death in childhood, but data on severely injured Swiss children are absent from existing national registries. Our aim was to analyze trauma activations and the profiles of critically injured children at a tertiary, non-academic Swiss pediatric emergency department (PED). In the absence of a national pediatric trauma database, this information may help to guide the design of infrastructure, processes within organizations, training, and policies. Methods. A retrospective analysis of pediatric trauma patients in a prospective resuscitation database over a 2-year period. Critically injured trauma patients under the age of 16 years were included. Patients were described with established triage and injury severity scales. Statistical evaluation included logistic regression analysis. Results. A total of 82 patients matched one or more of the study inclusion criteria. The most frequent age group was 12–15 years, and 27% were female. Trauma team activation (TTA) occurred with 49 patients (59.8%). Falls were the most frequent mechanism of injury, both overall and for major trauma. Road-traffic-related injuries had the highest relative risk of major trauma. In the multivariate analysis, patients receiving medicalized transport were more likely to trigger a TTA, but there was no association between TTA and age, gender, or Injury Severity Score (ISS). Nineteen patients (23.2%) sustained major trauma with an ISS > 15. Injuries of Abbreviated Injury Scale severity 3 or greater were most frequent to the head, followed by abdomen, chest, and extremities. The overall mortality rate in the cohort was 2.4%. Conclusions: Major trauma presentations only comprise a small proportion of the total patient load in the PED, and trauma team activation does not correlate with injury severity. Low exposure to high-acuity patients highlights the importance of deliberate learning and simulation for all professionals in the PED. Our findings indicate that high priority should be given to training in the management of severely injured children in the PED. The leading major trauma mechanisms were preventable, which should prompt further efforts in injury prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Pediatric Trauma Surgery)
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16 pages, 296 KiB  
Article
Post-Traumatic Stress as a Psychological Effect of Mild Head Injuries in Children
by Xenophon Sinopidis, Panagiotis Kallianezos, Constantinos Petropoulos, Despoina Gkentzi, Eirini Kostopoulou, Sotirios Fouzas, Theodore Dassios, Aggeliki Vervenioti, Ageliki Karatza, Stylianos Roupakias, Antonios Panagidis, Evangelos Blevrakis and Eleni Jelastopulu
Children 2023, 10(7), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10071115 - 27 Jun 2023
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Abstract
Background: Head trauma is one of the most common pediatric emergencies. While the psychological effects of severe head injuries are well studied, the psychological consequences of mild head injuries often go overlooked. Head injuries with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13–15, with [...] Read more.
Background: Head trauma is one of the most common pediatric emergencies. While the psychological effects of severe head injuries are well studied, the psychological consequences of mild head injuries often go overlooked. Head injuries with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13–15, with symptoms such as headache, vomiting, brief loss of consciousness, transient amnesia, and absence of focal neurological signs, are defined as mild. The aim of this study is to evaluate the stress of children with mild head injuries and their parents’ relevant perception during the early post-traumatic period. Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional study on a cohort of children with mild head injuries and their parents. Two questionnaires were implemented, the Child Trauma Screening Questionnaire (CTSQ) which was compiled by the children, and the Children’s Revised Impact of Event Scale (CRIES-13), compiled by their parents. Both questionnaires are widely used and reliable. The first presents an excellent predictive ability in children with a risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, while the second is a weighted self-completed detecting instrument for the measurement of post-traumatic stress in children and adolescents, with a detailed evaluation of their reactions to the traumatic incident. The participants responded one week and one month after the traumatic event. Results: A total of 175 children aged 6–14 years and 174 parents participated in the study. Stress was diagnosed in 33.7% of children after one week, and in 9.9% after one month. Parental responses suggesting stress presence in their children were 19.0% and 3.9%, respectively. These outcomes showed that mild head injuries are not so innocent. They are often underestimated by their parents and may generate a psychological burden to the children during the early post-traumatic period. Conclusions: Mild head injuries may affect the emotional welfare of children. Healthcare providers should understand the importance of the psychological effect of this overlooked type of injury. They should be trained in the psychological effect of trauma and be aware of this probability, promptly notify the parents accordingly, and provide psychological assistance beyond medical treatment. Follow-up and support are needed to avoid the possibility of future post-traumatic stress disorder. More extensive research is needed as the outcomes of this study regarded a limited population in numbers, age, and survey period. Furthermore, many children with mild head injuries do not ever visit the emergency department and stay at home unrecorded. Community-based research on the topic should therefore be considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Pediatric Trauma Surgery)
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