School Bullying during Childhood and Adolescence: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Global and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1522

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Lincoln Medical Center, Lincoln, NY 10451, USA
Interests: emergency; children; psychological crisis; psychosocial assessment; bullying
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Dear Colleagues,

Bullying is a complex public health issue in the United States, which is often recognized. It is abnormal behavior with numerous negative short- and long-term behavioral and health implications. Many children suffer from this form of aggression daily. It often occurs simultaneously across many locations, well beyond the school campus. It is essential to inquire about potential bullying exposure in every setting in which bullying can take place. Often, these children present with nonspecific symptoms and may not disclose bullying exposure. Therefore, using tools such as rapid screening for bullying, evaluation for injuries and mental health assessments to recognize bullying is imperative. We can stop and prevent this serious offense when we screen and identify bullying promptly. The development of validated instruments can assist in promptly identifying bullying exposure. Ambulatory pediatric services should screen children for bullying and develop interventions if bullying exposure is identified.

Dr. Muhammad Waseem
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • bullying interventions
  • bullying screening
  • bullying instruments
  • children

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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22 pages, 1498 KiB  
Systematic Review
Do Hormone Levels Influence Bullying during Childhood and Adolescence? A Systematic Review of the Literature
by Izaro Babarro, Ane Arregi, Ainara Andiarena, Nerea Lertxundi, Oscar Vegas and Jesus Ibarluzea
Children 2024, 11(2), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11020241 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1233
Abstract
(1) Background: Bullying is one of the most common forms of aggressive behavior during childhood and adolescence. Some decades ago, researchers began exploring the basis of peer victimization from a biological perspective. Specifically, the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal (HPG) axes have been studied [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Bullying is one of the most common forms of aggressive behavior during childhood and adolescence. Some decades ago, researchers began exploring the basis of peer victimization from a biological perspective. Specifically, the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal (HPG) axes have been studied in relation to status-relevant behaviors, such as bullying. (2) Methods: We conducted a systematic review following the PRISMA guide and registered the review protocol at PROSPERO (CRD42023494738). We searched for relevant studies in PubMed, Psycinfo, Scopus, and Web of Science, and assessed them using the Robins E-tool. (3) Results: Our search yielded 152 studies, of which 33 were included in the review. These studies explored the association between testosterone and cortisol levels with bullying behavior, finding diverse results. Most of the studies were rated as having a low risk of bias. (4) Conclusions: This study not only enhances our understanding of bullying, but also provides guidance for the development of prevention and management programs for it. In the future, researchers should continue exploring the joint effects of different hormones on the HPA and HPG axis, using a broader set of biomarkers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue School Bullying during Childhood and Adolescence: 2nd Edition)
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