Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children: Update

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 April 2024) | Viewed by 7446

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, Messina University, 98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: pediatric oral health; orthodontics for children and adolescents; dental radiology for children and adolescents; pediatric oral patology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

I am delighted to serve as Guest Editor of a Special Issue of Children entitled “Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children”.

Pediatric dentistry includes knowledge of the diagnostics, clinical and instrumental factors, pathophysiology and preventive and therapeutic aspects of dental pediatric patients. The objectives to be pursued are the identification of advanced diagnostic pathways which can help to define the various types of oral diseases in the developmental age and the acquisition of specific skills for prevention, interception and treatment. 

The goal of this Special Issue is to discuss any aspects of oral health with a multidisciplinary approach, using new technologies and digital systems.

We are seeking submissions of review articles, original research and contributions developed with innovative methods.

Thank you in advance to all those who submit a contribution.

Dr. Angela Militi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health
  • child
  • adolescent
  • prevention
  • dental treatment innovation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 320 KiB  
Article
Body Image and Psychological Impact of Dental Appearance in Adolescents with Malocclusion: A Preliminary Exploratory Study
by Federica Sicari, Emanuele Maria Merlo, Giulia Gentile, Riccardo Nucera, Marco Portelli, Salvatore Settineri, Liam Alexander MacKenzie Myles and Angela Militi
Children 2023, 10(10), 1691; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10101691 - 16 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1411
Abstract
Background: Body image and psychosocial functioning represent central challenges during adolescence and early adulthood. Malocclusion, defined as an irregularity in the alignment of the teeth, is known to negatively influence psychological outcomes. The current study aimed to elucidate the role of malocclusion, together [...] Read more.
Background: Body image and psychosocial functioning represent central challenges during adolescence and early adulthood. Malocclusion, defined as an irregularity in the alignment of the teeth, is known to negatively influence psychological outcomes. The current study aimed to elucidate the role of malocclusion, together with age, gender, and dental class, in body image and psychological functioning. Methods: A total of 126 participants aged from 12 to 19 years old (mean: 15.87, SD: 2.35, female participants: 52.4%, male participants: 47.6%) were recruited. Participants were visited at the University Hospital of Messina, Italy, and completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Body Image Concern Inventory (I-BICI), and the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ). Results: Significant correlations were found between age, dental class, the BICI, and the PIDAQ. In particular, age showed a positive and significant correlation with PIDAQ—total score. The correlations between occlusal status and the BICI variables were all significant and positive. All correlations between occlusal status and the PIDAQ variables were all significant and positive, except for dental self-confidence. The correlations between the variables of the PIDAQ and BICI instruments were all significant and positive, except for dental self-confidence, where the directions were significant and negative. Moreover, age, gender, and occlusal status predicted BICI and PIDAQ scores. Age was a positive predictor for PIDAQ self-confidence, gender for BICI and PIDAQ total scores, along with dysmorphic symptoms, social impact, psychological impact, and aesthetic concerns. Several significant gender differences were highlighted by the analyses, with higher scores in the female group on all the BICI variables, except symptom interference, and all the PIDAQ variables, except dental self-confidence. Conclusions: Malocclusion appeared to play a central role in the psychological, representational, and psychosocial life of the participants. This research suggests that malocclusion and dental issues influence the psychological, representational, and psychosocial life of adolescents. Further research is required to examine the psychological impact of dental problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children: Update)
12 pages, 272 KiB  
Article
Knowledge and Role of Paediatricians/Paediatric Residents in Infant Oral Healthcare and Dental Home across Saudi Arabia: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Satish Vishwanathaiah, Prabhadevi C. Maganur, Dhalia Hassan Albar, Ranya Hassan Albar, Mohammed Abdurabu Jafer, Safeyah A. Baeshen, Imtinan Ahmed Madkhali, Enas Jaber Mohana, Jawaher Saleh Sahli, Alhanouf K. Alnajdi, Manal Kinani Tahhah and Varsha Manoharan
Children 2023, 10(9), 1579; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10091579 - 21 Sep 2023
Viewed by 794
Abstract
The prevention of oral diseases in children is highly achievable through providing early exposure to oral healthcare habits, which would make children more receptive towards dental services. A cross-sectional study used a structured, self-explanatory questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge and role of 190 [...] Read more.
The prevention of oral diseases in children is highly achievable through providing early exposure to oral healthcare habits, which would make children more receptive towards dental services. A cross-sectional study used a structured, self-explanatory questionnaire to evaluate the knowledge and role of 190 paediatricians and paediatric residents towards infant oral healthcare and the dental home across Saudi Arabia. The authors sent a link to the questionnaire, comprising 36 questions, by email, as a Google e-form. The response rate obtained was 87.36%. A major proportion (95.8%) of the respondents considered that paediatricians play an important role in promoting oral health. Around 45.8% of the practitioners recommended tooth brushing after the eruption of the first tooth. About 38% of the practitioners were unaware of the children’s first dental visit. The majority (95.2%) agreed that there should be an increased awareness regarding home dental habits. Most of them (78.3%) examined the oral cavity for dental problems as a part of routine childcare, and the majority (75.3%) admitted that they did not evaluate fluoride needs. A statistically significant higher mean knowledge score was observed for practitioners with more than 30 years of experience (9.35 ± 2.29), and there was a significant positive correlation (r = 0.486) between the knowledge score and mean score for the role of paediatric practitioners. Overall, the study concluded that the knowledge of paediatricians and paediatric residents in SA towards infant oral healthcare and the dental home was inadequate, and their role in maintaining oral health was found to be moderately satisfactory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children: Update)
11 pages, 948 KiB  
Article
Impact of the Visual Performance Reinforcement Technique on Oral Hygiene Knowledge and Practices, Gingival Health, and Plaque Control in Hearing- and Speech-Impaired Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Ram Surath Kumar, Apurva Prashant Deshpande, Anil V. Ankola, Roopali M. Sankeshwari, Vinuta Hampiholi, Mamata Hebbal, Sagar Jalihal, Atrey J. Pai Khot, Deepika Valakkunja and Sree Lalita Kotha
Children 2022, 9(12), 1905; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9121905 - 05 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1570
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral health education (OHE), incorporating a novel pre-validated visual performance reinforcement (VPR) technique and sign language, on gingival health, plaque control, and oral hygiene knowledge and practices in 12 to 15-year-old hearing- and speech-impaired adolescents. [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the impact of oral health education (OHE), incorporating a novel pre-validated visual performance reinforcement (VPR) technique and sign language, on gingival health, plaque control, and oral hygiene knowledge and practices in 12 to 15-year-old hearing- and speech-impaired adolescents. A double-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted in a government school for deaf children in Belagavi, Karnataka, India. A total of 80 adolescents, aged 12–15 years, were randomly assigned, using a computer-generated table of random numbers, into two groups: Group A receiving the VPR technique (n = 40), and Group B receiving sign language (n = 40). A specially designed pre-validated closed-ended questionnaire was administered to both groups, followed by clinical examination to obtain the gingival and plaque index, before intervention and at a 16-week follow-up period. Group A showed a significant increase in the knowledge gained when compared to Group B. Similarly, a significant improvement in oral hygiene practices was also observed in Group A. However, at the 16-week follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences in gingival and plaque scores between the groups. OHE using the VPR technique can be as effective and satisfactory as sign language in the reduction of gingival and plaque scores and in the improvement of knowledge and its application in oral hygiene maintenance among hearing- and speech-impaired adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children: Update)
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12 pages, 1821 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of a Visual Interactive Game on Oral Hygiene Knowledge, Practices, and Clinical Parameters among Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Ram Surath Kumar K, Apurva Prashant Deshpande, Anil V. Ankola, Roopali M. Sankeshwari, Sagar Jalihal, Vinuta Hampiholi, Atrey J. Pai Khot, Mamata Hebbal, Sree Lalita Kotha and Lokesh Kumar S
Children 2022, 9(12), 1828; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9121828 - 26 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1751
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a novel interactive game-based visual performance technique (IGVP) and conventional oral health educational (OHE) talk on plaque control, gingival health, and oral hygiene knowledge and practices in 12–15-year-old schoolchildren. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a novel interactive game-based visual performance technique (IGVP) and conventional oral health educational (OHE) talk on plaque control, gingival health, and oral hygiene knowledge and practices in 12–15-year-old schoolchildren. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was undertaken in a private primary school in Belagavi, Karnataka, India. A total of 100 children aged 12–15 years were randomly assigned to either a conventional OHE talk (control group, n = 50) or the IGVP technique (test group, n = 50), using a computer-generated table of random numbers. A self-designed, pre-validated closed-ended questionnaire was collected from both groups, followed by clinical examination carried out using gingival and plaque index, pre- and post-intervention, at three months follow-up. There was a significant reduction in the mean gingival score and plaque score in the test group after intervention, indicating a 58.7% and 63.4% reduction, when compared to the control group, which had a 2.8% and 0.7% reduction, respectively (p < 0.001). The test group showed a significant increase in the percentage of knowledge gained (22.4%), compared to control group (7.8%). The IGVP technique proved to be more effective than a conventional OHE talk in the reduction of the plaque score, gingival score, and in the improvement of the knowledge of oral hygiene maintenance and its application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children: Update)
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Review

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13 pages, 750 KiB  
Review
Worldwide Variations in Fluoride Content in Beverages for Infants
by Eleonor Velez-León, Edisson-Mauricio Pacheco-Quito, Mario Díaz-Dosque and Daniela Tobar-Almache
Children 2023, 10(12), 1896; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10121896 - 07 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1433
Abstract
In situations where breastfeeding is impractical, milk formulas have emerged as the primary choice for infant nutrition. Numerous global studies have scrutinized the fluoride content in these formulas, uncovering fluctuations in fluoride levels directly associated with the method of preparation. This variability poses [...] Read more.
In situations where breastfeeding is impractical, milk formulas have emerged as the primary choice for infant nutrition. Numerous global studies have scrutinized the fluoride content in these formulas, uncovering fluctuations in fluoride levels directly associated with the method of preparation. This variability poses a potential risk of elevated fluoride concentrations and, consequently, an increased susceptibility to dental fluorosis in infants. The primary objective of this review is to intricately delineate the fluoride content in dairy formulas and emphasize the variability of these values concerning their reconstitution process. The review’s findings reveal that, among the 17 studies assessing fluoride levels in infant formula, milk-based formulas exhibit a range of 0.01–0.92 ppm, with only two studies exceeding 1.30 ppm. Conversely, soy-based formulas demonstrate values ranging from 0.13–1.11 ppm. In conclusion, the observed variability in fluoride levels in infant formulas is ascribed to the choice of the water source employed in the preparation process. This underscores the paramount importance of meticulously adhering to recommendations and guidelines provided by healthcare professionals concerning the utilization of these formulas and their meticulous reconstitution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Oral Health and Dental Care of Children: Update)
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