Child Health and Surgery

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2022) | Viewed by 14872

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Clinical Science ”L. Sacco”, University of Milan, 20157 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children’s Hospital “V. Buzzi”, 20154 Milan, Italy
Interests: simulation in pediatric surgery; pediatric surgery research; regenerative medicine in pediatric surgery; child health and surgery and traslational research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric surgery play a critical role in child health in resource-poor areas and pediatric surgery providers must lead the effort to prioritize children's surgery in pediatric health systems development. Pediatric surgical conditions cross a broad range of disease categories, including congenital and acquired anomalies, injuries, tumors. A taylored planning of surgery and a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to optimize the result.

This Special Issue “Child Health and Surgery” aims to publish  original research, reviews, clinical studies, brief reports, case reports, and editorials covering surgical advances, innovations in multidisciplinary pediatric management, translational and basic research within the field of pediatric surgery.

A better knowledge of innovative surgery is crucial to preserve neonatal, infant, child and adolescent physiopathology to optimize the health care and special needs child.

Dr. Gloria Pelizzo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pediatric surgery
  • Mininvasive surgery
  • Children
  • Health
  • Pediatric Multidisciplinary approach

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 169 KiB  
Editorial
Child Health and Surgery: A Challenge for Future Clinical Research
by Gloria Pelizzo and Valeria Calcaterra
Children 2022, 9(5), 742; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9050742 - 18 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
Pediatric surgical conditions cross a broad range of disease categories and includes injuries, infections, tumors, rare disease and congenital anomalies [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Health and Surgery)

Research

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9 pages, 24570 KiB  
Article
Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: How Does Social Media Influence Patients and Caregivers Seeking Information?
by Ashok Para, Brian Batko, Joseph Ippolito, Gabriel Hanna and Folorunsho Edobor-Osula
Children 2021, 8(10), 869; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8100869 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1326
Abstract
Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common orthopaedic condition affecting newborns. The rapid and vast adoption of social media has changed how we access medical information. The aim of this study was to deepen the understanding of the impact of social [...] Read more.
Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common orthopaedic condition affecting newborns. The rapid and vast adoption of social media has changed how we access medical information. The aim of this study was to deepen the understanding of the impact of social media as a tool used by caregivers. A search was performed on the Facebook (FB), Twitter (TW), and YouTube (YT) platforms. Information was quantitatively assessed by category, and number of posts and users. Comments and posts from the social medial platforms were then qualitatively assessed by using a thematic analysis. 16 Facebook pages and groups, 135 YouTube videos, and 5 Twitter accounts related to DDH were identified across 15 countries. A total of 25,471 comments/tweets were recorded. Across the social media platforms, the most common comments theme was “information sharing” (36.1%). Facebook groups had a significantly greater number of comments that were characterized as “social media as a second opinion” in comparison to YouTube videos (p < 0.001), whereas YouTube videos had significantly fewer comments characterized as “sharing information” in comparison to Facebook groups and Facebook pages (p < 0.0001). Orthopaedic surgeons may utilize caregiver presence on social media as an opportunity to help share accurate information and facilitate informed decision-making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Health and Surgery)
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10 pages, 1081 KiB  
Article
Consequences of COVID-19 Lockdown on Children and Their Pets: Dangerous Increase of Dog Bites among the Paediatric Population
by Giovanni Parente, Tommaso Gargano, Marco Di Mitri, Sara Cravano, Eduje Thomas, Marzia Vastano, Michela Maffi, Michele Libri and Mario Lima
Children 2021, 8(8), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8080620 - 22 Jul 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 5384
Abstract
Background: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has not only put our national health systems to the test, but it also notably hit the economy, the society and the psychology of the people. Our pets have been subjected to the pandemic related stress too. The aim [...] Read more.
Background: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has not only put our national health systems to the test, but it also notably hit the economy, the society and the psychology of the people. Our pets have been subjected to the pandemic related stress too. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the stress induced on domestic dogs resulted in an increase of dog bites in the paediatric population. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on all patients admitted to our paediatric emergency department for dog bite from January 2014 and December 2020. We compared the total mean dog bites of the years 2014–2019 and the mean number per single month with the respective 2020 data. The bites were divided between bites from family dogs and bites from stranger dogs. Continuous data were analysed using single sample t test while categorical values with chi-squared test, considering statistically significant a p value < 0.05. Results: From January 2014 to December 2019, we recorded a mean of 41 ± 5.9 dog bites (range: 30–46) of which a mean 13 ± 2.6 (range: 10–17) were due to family dogs (32%) and a mean of 28 ± 2.4 (range: 25–31) were due to stranger dogs (68%); the male-to-female ratio was 3:2 and 43% of the injuries concerned the head and face, 26% the lower limbs, 25% the upper limbs, 3% the genitalia and 3% the torso. From January 2020 to December 2020, 30 children were admitted for dog bites: 22 were from family dogs (73%) and 8 from stranger dogs (27%); the male-to-female ratio was 14:11 and 72% of the injuries concerned the head and face, 16% the upper limbs, 8% the lower limbs and 4% the torso. The 2020 data’s higher number of family dog bites compared with the mean of those in the 2014–2019 period was statistically significant (p < 0.01) such as the 2020 data’s lower number of stranger dog bites when compared with the mean number of stranger dog bites in the 2014–2019 period (p < 0.01). Between 2014 and 2019, a mean of 9 ± 2 (range: 6–12) of the wounds needed to be sutured (22%), while 32 ± 3 (range: 28–35) wounds were discharged after application of Steri Strips (78%). On the other hand, in 2020, 21 wounds needed to be sutured (70%), and 9 received just Steri Strips application (41%). The frequency distribution of the treatments required (stitches vs. Steri Strips) between the 2014 to 2019 period and the 2020 period was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The number of family dog bites in children increased in 2020, especially during the lockdown period. Paediatricians should pay a lot of attention now more than ever to educate parents on the importance of always supervising children who are playing with dogs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Health and Surgery)
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8 pages, 241 KiB  
Article
Airway Malacia: Clinical Features and Surgical Related Issues, a Ten-Year Experience from a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital
by Michele Ghezzi, Enza D’Auria, Andrea Farolfi, Valeria Calcaterra, Alessandra Zenga, Annalisa De Silvestri, Gloria Pelizzo and Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti
Children 2021, 8(7), 613; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8070613 - 20 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1802
Abstract
Background: Few studies have been carried out with the aim of describing the clinical course and follow-up of patients with tracheomalacia. We aim to describe the symptoms at diagnosis and the post-treatment clinical course of patients affected by airway malacia. Methods: We retrospectively [...] Read more.
Background: Few studies have been carried out with the aim of describing the clinical course and follow-up of patients with tracheomalacia. We aim to describe the symptoms at diagnosis and the post-treatment clinical course of patients affected by airway malacia. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed characteristics of pediatric patients with a diagnosis of airway malacia. Patients were classified into three groups: bronchomalacia (BM), tracheomalacia (TM) and tracheo-bronchomalacia (TBM). Demographic and clinical data, diagnostic work-up and surgical treatment were recorded. Results: 13/42 patients were affected by congenital syndromes (30.9%). Esophageal atresia with or without tracheal-esophageal fistula (EA/TEF) was detected in 7/42 patients (16.7%). Cardiovascular anomalies were found in 9/42 (21.4%) and idiopathic forms in 13/42 (30.9%). BM occurred in 7/42 (16.6%), TM in 23/42 (54.7%) and TBM in 12/42 (28.6%). At the diagnosis stage, a chronic cough was reported in 50% of cases with a higher prevalence in EA/TEF (p = 0.005). Surgery was performed in 16/42 (40%) of children. A chronic cough and acute respiratory failure were correlated to the need for surgery. During follow-up, there was no difference in persistence of symptoms between conservative vs surgical treatment (p = 0.47). Conclusion: the management of tracheomalacia remains a challenge for pediatricians. Clinical manifestations, such as a barking cough and acute respiratory failure may suggest the need for surgery. Follow-up is crucial, especially in those patients affected by comorbidities, so as to be able to manage effectively the possible persistence of symptoms, including those that may continue after surgical treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Health and Surgery)

Other

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4 pages, 204 KiB  
Case Report
Preserved Voluntary Micturition Control despite Early Urinary Diversion in Infancy—A Clue to a New Strategy
by Dominika Borselle, Dariusz Patkowski, Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska and Wojciech Apoznański
Children 2022, 9(5), 600; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9050600 - 23 Apr 2022
Viewed by 1330
Abstract
Micturition is an involuntary process based on spinal arcs in infants and children until a defined age. The awareness and voluntary control of voiding depends on specific areas in the central nervous system, especially cortical regions. The cells and connections between these areas [...] Read more.
Micturition is an involuntary process based on spinal arcs in infants and children until a defined age. The awareness and voluntary control of voiding depends on specific areas in the central nervous system, especially cortical regions. The cells and connections between these areas develop over time and regulate the voiding process. The ability to maintain continence and to adjust physiological needs to appropriate environmental conditions is considered to be acquired through systematic behavioral education, especially toilet training. The recommendations specify the age at which to start establishing the relevant habits. The purpose of these guidelines is to achieve proper micturition control development and to avoid functional lower urinary tract (LUT) disorders. We present a case of a patient who underwent complete urinary diversion in infancy and reconstruction of the urinary tract eleven years later. For eleven years, she had an empty bladder and no toilet training. After undiversion, she regained full continence in a short space of time. The presence of proper LUT function and a controlled micturition process raises the question of the standard toilet training recommendations’ validity. The aim of our work focuses on the following question: Is toilet training the only way to achieve micturition skills and proper urinary tract function? The history of our patient and the literature reveal that voluntary micturition may develop without stimulating signals of filling from bladder receptors and independently of recommended behavioral education, so toilet training seems to not be necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Health and Surgery)
7 pages, 222 KiB  
Case Report
Case Series of Variable Acute Appendicitis in Children with SARS-CoV-2 Infection
by Arnis Engelis, Liene Smane, Jana Pavare, Astra Zviedre, Timurs Zurmutai, Marisa M. Berezovska, Jurijs Bormotovs, Mohit Kakar, Amulya K. Saxena and Aigars Petersons
Children 2021, 8(12), 1207; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8121207 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2184
Abstract
This case series study consists of six children, aged 5–16 years, admitted to a centralized tertiary paediatric hospital serving a population of 1.9 million with acute appendicitis in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection. From the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020 until [...] Read more.
This case series study consists of six children, aged 5–16 years, admitted to a centralized tertiary paediatric hospital serving a population of 1.9 million with acute appendicitis in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection. From the beginning of the pandemic in March 2020 until August 2021, 121 COVID-19-positive children were admitted to the hospital. A total of 49 (40.5%) of these patients presented with gastrointestinal symptoms, of which six were diagnosed with acute appendicitis. Five underwent an appendectomy, while one was treated conservatively. To date, it has been reported that appendicitis may have a plausible association with SARS-CoV-2 infection in children. With COVID-19 cases rising, every medical specialist, including all paediatric surgeons, must be ready to treat common acute diseases with SARS-CoV-2 infection as a comorbidity. Providers should consider testing for this infection in paediatric patients with severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Non-surgical treatment of acute appendicitis in children may gain new importance during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Further studies are needed to prove the link of causality between COVID-19 and acute appendicitis in children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Health and Surgery)
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