Selected Papers from the 45th Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA 2022)

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction Management, and Computers & Digitization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 25864

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design & Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
Interests: construction informatics; blockchain, IoT and digital twins; artificial intelligence techniques; construction management; embodied carbon estimating; project management; public-private partnerships; construction data analytics; disaster management; economics of sustainability; risk management; circular economy; offsite construction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: international construction; project management; sustainable construction
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: BIM implementation; computer vision; digital construction; digital twin
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: fire engineering; steel–concrete composite technology; sustainable building materials; finite element modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith 2751, Australia
Interests: knowledge management; construction/project management; sustainability; smart modern construction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: construction health and safety; project finance; public–private partnership; smart construction; sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: built environment; fire safety; construction management; composite structures

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: construction materials; construction technology; steel construction; structural engineering

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Design and Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: BIM application in WHS; procurement and sustainability; construction safety and health management; human behaviour in built environment; organisational culture and behaviours; robotics in construction; sustainable procurement
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 45th Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA) conference was hosted by Western Sydney University, Kingswood Campus, Sydney, Australia by the School of Engineering, Design, and Built Environment in collaboration with the Centre for Smart Modern Construction, Western Sydney University, between 23rd and 25th November 2022. The conference presented the latest research with the theme of “Global Challenges in a Disrupted World: Smart, Sustainable and Resilient Approaches in the Built Environment.” AUBEA 2022 brought together researchers, educators, students, and industry practitioners from Australia and other regions to share knowledge, collaborate, reflect, and learn about current issues and participate in shaping the future of the construction and built environment sectors.

The conference presented the latest research on a wide range of topics related to “Smart, Sustainable and Resilient Approaches in the Built Environment”; the research proceedings were split into eight sub-themes. The key research areas discussed include construction project management, the digitalisation of construction, industrialisation, sustainability, resilience, health and safety, and education in the built environment. 

Selected authors from the AUBEA 2022 are invited to submit their extended papers to this Special Issue, which will be fully peer reviewed for further selection and publication.

Prof. Dr. Srinath Perera
Dr. Ali Al-Ashwal
Dr. Wei Zhou
Dr. Md Kamrul Hassan
Dr. Sepani Senaratne
Dr. Robert Osei-Kyei
Dr. Sameera Wijesiri Pathirana
Dr. Brendan Kirkland
Dr. Yingbin Feng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digitalisation
  • health and safety
  • construction
  • project management
  • resilience
  • industrialisation
  • sustainability

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

23 pages, 1857 KiB  
Article
‘Buildability’ in the Digital Age: A Phenomenological Discourse of Industry Practitioners’ Perceptions
by Puwakkatiya Lokuge Indrani Wimalaratne, Udayangani Kulatunga and Thayaparan Gajendran
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2870; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112870 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 669
Abstract
Since the emergence of the concept of “buildability” in 1983, numerous studies have focused on improving project performance through buildability. Initially, the buildability discourse was based on narrow definitions and focused on aspects that could improve construction performance. Although explicit academic discourse on [...] Read more.
Since the emergence of the concept of “buildability” in 1983, numerous studies have focused on improving project performance through buildability. Initially, the buildability discourse was based on narrow definitions and focused on aspects that could improve construction performance. Although explicit academic discourse on buildability has been limited for three decades, the ongoing calls to improve construction performance have never subsided. As buildability was seen as important by industry in the 1980s and 1990s for improving performance, its limited discourse warrants investigation to understand how buildability has evolved in practice over the last 30 years. Therefore, this study aims to review and extend the discourse of the buildability concept using a phenomenological research approach to capture the unconscious evolution of the concept through stakeholder interpretations. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) research philosophy embedded in the exploratory tradition was followed to uncover the 16 key underlying constructs of the buildability concept. The study is significant for casting potential buildability discourse trajectories for the future of the construction industry by integrating people, process, and technology. The findings extend the dimensions of buildability, accommodating stakeholders’ expectations and project conditions as part of buildability decisions. Moreover, the study suggests that emerging technologies (e.g., AI) will become integral to buildability processes in terms of managing knowledge in the future. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 699 KiB  
Article
Overcoming Head Contractor Barriers to Sustainable Waste Management Solutions in the Australian Construction Industry
by Pieter Antoon van der Lans, Christopher Antony Jensen and Mehran Oraee
Buildings 2023, 13(9), 2211; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13092211 - 30 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1139
Abstract
The construction industry has one of the highest waste intensities in Australia. While there are barriers to the implementation of sustainable waste management (WM) practices, there is a lack of viable solutions for head contractors to overcome these barriers. This research investigates the [...] Read more.
The construction industry has one of the highest waste intensities in Australia. While there are barriers to the implementation of sustainable waste management (WM) practices, there is a lack of viable solutions for head contractors to overcome these barriers. This research investigates the role of incentives in achieving sustainable WM in the Australian commercial construction industry. A qualitative approach was adopted through interviews with experts in the field to explore the role of incentives as possible solutions to the barriers presented. The findings show that participants are willing to use more sustainable WM practices. However, the barriers are perceived to be too substantial. Many types of incentives can encourage changes in behavior, which contribute to better waste outcomes. The findings also indicate key stakeholders such as the client, government, and industry regulators may provide incentives, including enhancing relevant key performance indicators, amending existing legislations, and implementing government programs to foster a Circular Economy to improve sustainable WM practices. This study contributes to the field by raising awareness about the role of incentives for head contractors to achieve sustainable WM practices. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 4400 KiB  
Article
Deterministic and Probabilistic Risk Management Approaches in Construction Projects: A Systematic Literature Review and Comparative Analysis
by Ania Khodabakhshian, Taija Puolitaival and Linda Kestle
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1312; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051312 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4067
Abstract
Risks and uncertainties are inevitable in construction projects and can drastically change the expected outcome, negatively impacting the project’s success. However, risk management (RM) is still conducted in a manual, largely ineffective, and experience-based fashion, hindering automation and knowledge transfer in projects. The [...] Read more.
Risks and uncertainties are inevitable in construction projects and can drastically change the expected outcome, negatively impacting the project’s success. However, risk management (RM) is still conducted in a manual, largely ineffective, and experience-based fashion, hindering automation and knowledge transfer in projects. The construction industry is benefitting from the recent Industry 4.0 revolution and the advancements in data science branches, such as artificial intelligence (AI), for the digitalization and optimization of processes. Data-driven methods, e.g., AI and machine learning algorithms, Bayesian inference, and fuzzy logic, are being widely explored as possible solutions to RM domain shortcomings. These methods use deterministic or probabilistic risk reasoning approaches, the first of which proposes a fixed predicted value, and the latter embraces the notion of uncertainty, causal dependencies, and inferences between variables affecting projects’ risk in the predicted value. This research used a systematic literature review method with the objective of investigating and comparatively analyzing the main deterministic and probabilistic methods applied to construction RM in respect of scope, primary applications, advantages, disadvantages, limitations, and proven accuracy. The findings established recommendations for optimum AI-based frameworks for different management levels—enterprise, project, and operational—for large or small data sets. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

31 pages, 11486 KiB  
Article
Comparative Response Spectrum Analysis on 15- and 50-Story Reinforced Concrete Buildings Having Shear Walls with and without Openings as per EN1998-1 Seismic Code
by Mistreselasie Abate, Ana Catarina Jorge Evangelista and Vivian W. Y. Tam
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1303; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051303 - 16 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1603
Abstract
Medium-rise reinforced concrete (RC) framed apartment complexes with stories ranging from 15 to 50 are becoming more common in Ethiopia’s main cities. In these RC-framed structures, shear walls are included for lateral load resistance. As apertures are frequently provided in shear walls, it [...] Read more.
Medium-rise reinforced concrete (RC) framed apartment complexes with stories ranging from 15 to 50 are becoming more common in Ethiopia’s main cities. In these RC-framed structures, shear walls are included for lateral load resistance. As apertures are frequently provided in shear walls, it is critical to evaluate their influence on story drift, stiffness, shear and moments, and stress within the shear walls. A 3D study with five different cases was carried out with ETABS version 19.00 software to investigate the influence of apertures in a building’s shear wall. This study looks at the effects of changing the size and location of these apertures. Based on this analysis, extensive data were acquired, and useful conclusions were formed that will be useful to practicing engineers. The seismic parameter utilized for the response spectrum study was Building Code of Ethiopia ES8-15, which conforms to Eurocode 8-2004 seismic code guidelines (based on EN1998-1) with target response spectrum type-I. The following parameters were used: ground acceleration, ag/g = 0.1, spectrum type = I, ground type = B, soil factor, S = 1.35, spectrum period, Tb, = 0.05 s, spectrum period, Tc = 0.25 s, spectrum period, Td = 1.2 s, lower bound factor, beta = 0.2, behavior factor = 1, and damping ratio = 5%. The outcomes are compared using various parameters such as displacement, story drift, story stiffness, story shear, and story moment both with and without shear wall opening cases. This study will give tremendous insight into the effect of shear wall openings on the performance of the structure. The analysis in this work was carried out on a linear model, which may not represent the complete local response of the structure; thus, future researchers should perform nonlinear analysis based on a performance-based design. It was concluded from this investigation that incorporating shear walls considerably enhanced the performance of the building over framed structures. Shear wall openings in a structure have a significant influence on the building’s performance. Due to their significant resistance to earthquake forces, shear wall structures are highly recommended for seismic hazard zones. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1941 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Effectiveness of Immersive Virtual Reality for Project Scheduling in Construction Education
by Muhammad Sami Ur Rehman, Narmin Abouelkhier and Muhammad Tariq Shafiq
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1123; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051123 - 23 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2902
Abstract
The emergence of immersive technologies, such as virtual reality (VR) headsets, has revolutionized the way we experience the physical world by creating a virtual, interactive environment. In the field of education, this technology has immense potential to provide students with a safe and [...] Read more.
The emergence of immersive technologies, such as virtual reality (VR) headsets, has revolutionized the way we experience the physical world by creating a virtual, interactive environment. In the field of education, this technology has immense potential to provide students with a safe and controlled environment in which to experience real-world scenarios that may be otherwise unfeasible or unsafe. However, limited research exists on the effectiveness of integrating immersive technologies into technical education delivery. This research investigated the potential use of immersive virtual reality (IVR) in university-level construction management courses, with a focus on integrating IVR technology into traditional education for construction project planning and control. The experiment involved comparing the students’ learning and understanding of the subject matter using a set of two-dimensional construction drawings and a critical path method (CPM)-based construction schedule, with and without the use of an immersive environment. The findings suggested that the use of immersive technology significantly improved the students’ ability to understand technical concepts and identify any errors in the construction sequence when compared to traditional teaching methods. This paper presents the details of the experiment and a comparative analysis of both approaches in terms of students’ learning and understanding of project planning, sequencing, and scheduling. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 8018 KiB  
Article
Community-Focused Renewable Energy Transition with Virtual Power Plant in an Australian City—A Case Study
by Chengyang Liu, Rebecca Yang, Kaige Wang and Jiatong Zhang
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 844; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040844 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1890
Abstract
The global transition to a renewable-powered economy is gaining momentum as renewable energy becomes more cost-effective and energy-efficient. Renewable-energy-integrated Virtual Power Plants (VPPs) are capable of facilitating renewable transition, reducing distributed generator impacts, and creating value for prosumers and communities by producing renewable [...] Read more.
The global transition to a renewable-powered economy is gaining momentum as renewable energy becomes more cost-effective and energy-efficient. Renewable-energy-integrated Virtual Power Plants (VPPs) are capable of facilitating renewable transition, reducing distributed generator impacts, and creating value for prosumers and communities by producing renewable energy, engaging in the electricity market, and providing electricity network functions. In this paper, we conducted a case study in the City of Greater Bendigo to evaluate the challenges and opportunities of the community-focused renewable energy transition through establishing VPP with community-based renewable generators and storage systems. A reinforcement learning algorithm was formulated to optimise the energy supply, load shifting, and market trading in the VPP system. The proposed VPP system has great potential to improve the economic value and carbon emission reduction performance of local renewable resources: it can reduce 50–70% of the case study city’s carbon emissions in 10 years and lower the electricity price from the current range of 0.15 AUD/kWh (off-peak) −0.30 AUD/kWh (peak) as provided by Victorian Essential Services Committee to 0.05 AUD/kWh (off-peak) (peak). Overall, this study proposed a comprehensive framework to investigate community-based VPP in a complex urban environment and validated the capability of the VPP in supporting the renewable transition for Australian communities. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

27 pages, 2267 KiB  
Review
A Review of the Digital Skills Needed in the Construction Industry: Towards a Taxonomy of Skills
by Fida Hussain Siddiqui, Muhammad Jamaluddin Thaheem and Amir Abdekhodaee
Buildings 2023, 13(11), 2711; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13112711 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1598
Abstract
The construction industry is slowly embracing digitalisation in line with the Industry 4.0 revolution and the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, progress has been sluggish due to stakeholders’ limited awareness of digital skills. This study addresses this issue by developing a comprehensive [...] Read more.
The construction industry is slowly embracing digitalisation in line with the Industry 4.0 revolution and the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, progress has been sluggish due to stakeholders’ limited awareness of digital skills. This study addresses this issue by developing a comprehensive taxonomy of digital skills required to successfully implement the Industry 4.0 principles of digitalisation in the construction industry. A systematic literature review was conducted by mining the Scopus and Web of Science databases to identify relevant literature and map the skills currently used or needed for digitalisation. The study also examined publication trends and outlets to gain insight into developments. Additionally, VOSviewer was used to conduct a scientometric analysis of the shortlisted articles to identify important keywords and authorship collaboration networks within this research domain. A total of thirty-five digital skills were identified from the literature. These skills were organised into a taxonomy with categories named automation and robotics, coding and programming, design, drafting and engineering, digital data acquisition and integration, digital literacy, digitisation and virtualisation, modelling and simulation, and planning and estimation. The developed taxonomy will help stakeholders plan strategically to provide digital skills to the new graduates joining the workforce, enabling a more comprehensive approach to the digitalisation of the construction industry. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 734 KiB  
Review
Re-Thinking Spatial Design in Homes to Include Means and Access Restriction with Material Impacts as Passive Suicide Prevention Methods: A Systematic Review of Design for Australian Homes
by Michael Booth, Pushpitha Kalutara and Neda Abbasi
Buildings 2023, 13(6), 1452; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13061452 - 02 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1505
Abstract
This systematic review analyses research that introduces commercial design applications that could be adopted for suicide prevention in homes. Furthermore, this literature review captures social, spatial and biophilic design methods to improve wellness in homes using environmental design psychology. Safety and human wellness [...] Read more.
This systematic review analyses research that introduces commercial design applications that could be adopted for suicide prevention in homes. Furthermore, this literature review captures social, spatial and biophilic design methods to improve wellness in homes using environmental design psychology. Safety and human wellness frame this spatial design research that examines means and access restriction to improve home safety and prevent suicides. Suicide is a growing phenomenon that deserves specific attention to how environments can impact or restrict events. There is a substantial evidence base to evaluate suicide prevention methods used in high-risk environments of health and healing environments, workplaces and incarceration facilities. This review outlines design methods using spatial arrangement and material choices to improve human wellness in homes. The effects of biochemical reactions, such as those studied in toxicology, and stress are considered in this research to suggest material choices and applications in design to improve mental health in homes. Spatial designs for suicide prevention can guide various prevention measures, such as adopting means and access restriction and environmental design methods for wellness and considering impacts during lockdown periods. Environmental design psychology research supplies evidence for improved spatial arrangements in homes, with evidence showing that design applications can restore and improve mental health. This systematic review shows evidence for planning methods to prevent suicides considering both means and access restriction with considerable biochemical impacts from design. Design methods discovered by this systematic review will be considered for future studies and used within economic modelling to demonstrate design guidelines that improve wellbeing and support existing suicide prevention methods for Australian homes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 958 KiB  
Review
Retention over Attraction: A Review of Women’s Experiences in the Australian Construction Industry; Challenges and Solutions
by Amir Naser Ghanbaripour, Roksana Jahan Tumpa, Riza Yosia Sunindijo, Weiwei Zhang, Parinaz Yousefian, Ranka Novak Camozzi, Carol Hon, Nima Talebian, Tingting Liu and Mina Hemmati
Buildings 2023, 13(2), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13020490 - 11 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3459
Abstract
Despite substantial investments and efforts by governments, construction organisations, and researchers, the construction industry remains one of the most male-dominated industries in Australia, with women being underrepresented numerically and hierarchically. Efforts to attract and retain women in construction have been implemented inconsistently on [...] Read more.
Despite substantial investments and efforts by governments, construction organisations, and researchers, the construction industry remains one of the most male-dominated industries in Australia, with women being underrepresented numerically and hierarchically. Efforts to attract and retain women in construction have been implemented inconsistently on an ad hoc basis. As part of a larger research project that focuses on retaining women in the Australian construction industry, this research conducts a systematic literature review (SLR) in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. The objective is to explore the factors that influence women’s careers and their experiences in the Australian construction industry that have been identified in the literature over the past three decades. Additionally, the findings are anticipated to inform future efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of current initiatives to retain women and develop a framework for enhancing women’s experiences and retaining them in this profession. This SLR revealed that excessive and rigid work hours, gendered culture and informal rules, limited career development opportunities, and negative perceptions of women’s abilities are the main factors and issues that cause women to leave the industry. Among these, rigid and long work hours seem to be the foremost factor to be prioritised. Understanding the roles of key variables in driving this cultural change is important to ensure that concrete progress is made. The paper draws three major aspects from the literature in which solutions and policies can be researched, designed and implemented. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

16 pages, 10348 KiB  
Systematic Review
Smart Adaptive Homes and Their Potential to Improve Space Efficiency and Personalisation
by Thomas Goessler and Yamuna Kaluarachchi
Buildings 2023, 13(5), 1132; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13051132 - 24 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4951
Abstract
Over the last decades, population growth in urban areas and the subsequent rise in demand for housing have resulted in significant space and housing shortages. This paper investigates the influence of smart technologies on small urban dwellings to make them flexible, adaptive and [...] Read more.
Over the last decades, population growth in urban areas and the subsequent rise in demand for housing have resulted in significant space and housing shortages. This paper investigates the influence of smart technologies on small urban dwellings to make them flexible, adaptive and personalised. The study builds on the hypothesis that adaptive homes and smart technology could increase efficiency and space usage up to two to three times compared to a conventional apartment. The present study encompasses a comprehensive semi-systematic literature review that includes several case studies of smart adaptive homes demonstrating various strategies that can be employed to enhance the functionality of small spaces while reducing the physical and psychological limitations associated with them. These strategies involve incorporating time-dependent functions and furniture, as well as division elements that can adapt to the changing needs of users in real-time. This review further categorises types of flexibility and adaptation regarding the size of the moving elements, the time that the transformation takes and whether it is performed manually (by a human) or automatically (by a machine). Results show that smart and adaptive technology can increase space efficiency by reducing the need for separate physical spaces for different activities. Smart technology substantially increases the versatility and multifunctionality of a room in all three dimensions and allows for adaptation and customisation for a variety of users. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop