Neural Correlates of Perception in Noise in the Auditory System

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 3935

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Paris-Saclay Institute of Neuroscience (NeuroPSI, UMR 9197), University Paris-Saclay, 91400 Saclay, France
Interests: auditory perception; neuronal selectivity; communication sounds; auditory cortex; masking noise

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Humans and animals constantly face challenging acoustic environments such as various background noises that impair the detection, discrimination, and identification of behaviorally relevant sounds. Dissecting how auditory neurons discriminate communication sounds in noise is a major goal in auditory neuroscience. Over the last decade, many studies in humans and animals have aimed to understand the neural mechanisms used by the auditory system to extract and acutely represent the relevant information necessary for discriminating communication sounds in various situations of acoustic degradations.

This Special Issue of Biology entitled “Neural Correlates of Perception in Noise in the Auditory System” will integrate the human and animal literature aiming to understand the mechanisms operating during perception of communication sounds in noise. This Special Issue aims to collect reviews and original articles on recent investigations of neural correlates of perception in noise either with humans or with various animal models. Theoretical contributions and modeling studies are also welcome if they are directly related to the perception of communication sounds in noise.

Dr. Jean Marc Edeline
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • auditory perception
  • neuronal selectivity
  • communication sounds
  • auditory cortex
  • masking noise

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2018 KiB  
Article
Can Extensive Training Transform a Mouse into a Guinea Pig? An Evaluation Based on the Discriminative Abilities of Inferior Colliculus Neurons
by Alexandra Martin, Samira Souffi, Chloé Huetz and Jean-Marc Edeline
Biology 2024, 13(2), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology13020092 - 02 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1114
Abstract
Humans and animals maintain accurate discrimination between communication sounds in the presence of loud sources of background noise. In previous studies performed in anesthetized guinea pigs, we showed that, in the auditory pathway, the highest discriminative abilities between conspecific vocalizations were found in [...] Read more.
Humans and animals maintain accurate discrimination between communication sounds in the presence of loud sources of background noise. In previous studies performed in anesthetized guinea pigs, we showed that, in the auditory pathway, the highest discriminative abilities between conspecific vocalizations were found in the inferior colliculus. Here, we trained CBA/J mice in a Go/No-Go task to discriminate between two similar guinea pig whistles, first in quiet conditions, then in two types of noise, a stationary noise and a chorus noise at three SNRs. Control mice were passively exposed to the same number of whistles as trained mice. After three months of extensive training, inferior colliculus (IC) neurons were recorded under anesthesia and the responses were quantified as in our previous studies. In quiet, the mean values of the firing rate, the temporal reliability and mutual information obtained from trained mice were higher than from the exposed mice and the guinea pigs. In stationary and chorus noise, there were only a few differences between the trained mice and the guinea pigs; and the lowest mean values of the parameters were found in the exposed mice. These results suggest that behavioral training can trigger plasticity in IC that allows mice neurons to reach guinea pig-like discrimination abilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Correlates of Perception in Noise in the Auditory System)
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13 pages, 1780 KiB  
Article
Benefits of Harmonicity for Hearing in Noise Are Limited to Detection and Pitch-Related Discrimination Tasks
by Neha Rajappa, Daniel R. Guest and Andrew J. Oxenham
Biology 2023, 12(12), 1522; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12121522 - 13 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Harmonic complex tones are easier to detect in noise than inharmonic complex tones, providing a potential perceptual advantage in complex auditory environments. Here, we explored whether the harmonic advantage extends to other auditory tasks that are important for navigating a noisy auditory environment, [...] Read more.
Harmonic complex tones are easier to detect in noise than inharmonic complex tones, providing a potential perceptual advantage in complex auditory environments. Here, we explored whether the harmonic advantage extends to other auditory tasks that are important for navigating a noisy auditory environment, such as amplitude- and frequency-modulation detection. Sixty young normal-hearing listeners were tested, divided into two equal groups with and without musical training. Consistent with earlier studies, harmonic tones were easier to detect in noise than inharmonic tones, with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) advantage of about 2.5 dB, and the pitch discrimination of the harmonic tones was more accurate than that of inharmonic tones, even after differences in audibility were accounted for. In contrast, neither amplitude- nor frequency-modulation detection was superior with harmonic tones once differences in audibility were accounted for. Musical training was associated with better performance only in pitch-discrimination and frequency-modulation-detection tasks. The results confirm a detection and pitch-perception advantage for harmonic tones but reveal that the harmonic benefits do not extend to suprathreshold tasks that do not rely on extracting the fundamental frequency. A general theory is proposed that may account for the effects of both noise and memory on pitch-discrimination differences between harmonic and inharmonic tones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Correlates of Perception in Noise in the Auditory System)
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32 pages, 12093 KiB  
Article
Information-Theoretic Approaches in EEG Correlates of Auditory Perceptual Awareness under Informational Masking
by Alexandre Veyrié, Arnaud Noreña, Jean-Christophe Sarrazin and Laurent Pezard
Biology 2023, 12(7), 967; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12070967 - 06 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1006
Abstract
In informational masking paradigms, the successful segregation between the target and masker creates auditory perceptual awareness. The dynamics of the build-up of auditory perception is based on a set of interactions between bottom–up and top–down processes that generate neuronal modifications within the brain [...] Read more.
In informational masking paradigms, the successful segregation between the target and masker creates auditory perceptual awareness. The dynamics of the build-up of auditory perception is based on a set of interactions between bottom–up and top–down processes that generate neuronal modifications within the brain network activity. These neural changes are studied here using event-related potentials (ERPs), entropy, and integrated information, leading to several measures applied to electroencephalogram signals. The main findings show that the auditory perceptual awareness stimulated functional activation in the fronto-temporo-parietal brain network through (i) negative temporal and positive centro-parietal ERP components; (ii) an enhanced processing of multi-information in the temporal cortex; and (iii) an increase in informational content in the fronto-central cortex. These different results provide information-based experimental evidence about the functional activation of the fronto-temporo-parietal brain network during auditory perceptual awareness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Correlates of Perception in Noise in the Auditory System)
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