Male Disorders: Fertility Care and Support, Preservation and Restoration

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Reproductive Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 5932

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
INSERM, U1239, Adrenal and Gonadal Pathophysiology Team, Laboratory of Neuroendocrine Endocrine and Germinal Differentiation and Communication, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen Normandy University, 76000 Rouen, France
Interests: cryopreservation; epigenetic; fertility preservation; immunohistochemistry; in vitro spermatogenesis; -OMICs tools adapted to reproductive biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Male infertility can be caused by low sperm production, abnormal sperm function or blockages that prevent the delivery of sperm. Conditions (e.g., testicular cancer and testicular torsion) and injuries that affect male reproductive organs, chronic health problems and lifestyle choices contribute to male infertility. In recent decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the treatment modalities of pathologies, especially for cancer and severe chronic medical conditions, leading to an increase in patient survivorship and demand for future parenthood. Recognition and patient counseling before therapies with gonadotoxic effects are of paramount importance. When timing is appropriate, sperm cryopreservation is considered the gold standard for fertility preservation in pubertal or adult men. Testicular tissue or spermatogonial stem cell graft as well as in vitro spermatogenesis are experimental and represent promising alternatives for pre-pubertal patients. However, complete functional spermatogenesis (in vitro or in vivo) from human testicular tissue is not still available.

Papers describing or discussing molecular investigations in human or animal models that help us to understand the impact of treatments (chemotherapy and radiotherapy), the evaluation of sperm quality, cryopreservation steps and the in vivo or in vitro development of male gametes with reproductive potential can be included.

Dr. Ludovic Dumont
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • cancer
  • fertility
  • cryopreservation
  • spermatozoa
  • testicular
  • in vitro spermatogenesis
  • cell transplantation
  • graft
  • male

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 6387 KiB  
Article
Towards a More Comprehensive Picture of the MicroRNA-23a/b-3p Impact on Impaired Male Fertility
by Lea Simone Becker, Mohammad A. Al Smadi, Hanna Koch, Hashim Abdul-Khaliq, Eckart Meese and Masood Abu-Halima
Biology 2023, 12(6), 800; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12060800 - 31 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1228
Abstract
The expression levels of various genes involved in human spermatogenesis are influenced by microRNAs (miRNAs), specifically microRNA-23a/b-3p. While certain genes are essential for spermatogenesis and male germ cell function, the regulation of their expression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether microRNA-23a/b-3p [...] Read more.
The expression levels of various genes involved in human spermatogenesis are influenced by microRNAs (miRNAs), specifically microRNA-23a/b-3p. While certain genes are essential for spermatogenesis and male germ cell function, the regulation of their expression remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether microRNA-23a/b-3p targets genes involved in spermatogenesis and the impact of this targeting on the expression levels of these genes in males with impaired fertility. In-silico prediction and dual-luciferase assays were used to determine the potential connections between microRNA-23a/b-3p overexpression and reduced expression levels of 16 target genes. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was conducted on 41 oligoasthenozoospermic men receiving infertility treatment and 41 age-matched normozoospermic individuals to verify the lower expression level of target genes. By employing dual-luciferase assays, microRNA-23a-3p was found to directly target eight genes, namely NOL4, SOX6, GOLGA6C, PCDHA9, G2E3, ZNF695, CEP41, and RGPD1, while microRNA-23b-3p directly targeted three genes, namely SOX6, GOLGA6C, and ZNF695. The intentional alteration of the microRNA-23a/b binding site within the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of the eight genes resulted in the loss of responsiveness to microRNA-23a/b-3p. This confirmed that NOL4, SOX6, GOLGA6C, PCDHA9, and CEP41 are direct targets for microRNA-23a-3p, while NOL4, SOX6, and PCDHA9 are direct targets for microRNA-23b-3p. The sperm samples of oligoasthenozoospermic men had lower expression levels of target genes than age-matched normozoospermic men. Correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between basic semen parameters and lower expression levels of target genes. The study suggests that microRNA-23a/b-3p plays a significant role in spermatogenesis by controlling the expression of target genes linked to males with impaired fertility and has an impact on basic semen parameters. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 1270 KiB  
Review
Reversible Contraception in Males: An Obtainable Target?
by Joanna Nandita Koilpillai, Emily Nunan, Landon Butler, Fabio Pinaffi and Joshua T. Butcher
Biology 2024, 13(5), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology13050291 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 839
Abstract
The last few decades have brought contraception to the forefront of research, with great strides made in effectively targeting and optimizing the physiology, pharmacology, and delivery processes that prevent pregnancy. However, these advances still predominantly target female contraceptives for the prevention of contraception, [...] Read more.
The last few decades have brought contraception to the forefront of research, with great strides made in effectively targeting and optimizing the physiology, pharmacology, and delivery processes that prevent pregnancy. However, these advances still predominantly target female contraceptives for the prevention of contraception, whereas targeting the male sex has lagged far behind. This has led to a marked deficiency in safe and effective male contraceptive agents, resulting in a heavy dependence on female contraceptives to prevent unwanted and unplanned pregnancies. Current research in the veterinary field and in rodents highlights several promising avenues whereby novel, safe, and effective male contraceptive alternatives are being developed—with an emphasis on reduced side effects and reversibility potential. This review aims to discuss current and novel male contraceptives (both human and veterinary formulations) while highlighting their efficacy, advantages, and disadvantages. Full article
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13 pages, 1469 KiB  
Review
Unraveling the Intricacies of the Seminal Microbiome and Its Impact on Human Fertility
by Celia Corral-Vazquez, Joan Blanco, Zaida Sarrate and Ester Anton
Biology 2024, 13(3), 150; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology13030150 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1402
Abstract
Although the microbial communities from seminal fluid were an unexplored field some decades ago, their characteristics and potential roles are gradually coming to light. Therefore, a complex and specific microbiome population with commensal niches and fluctuating species has started to be revealed. In [...] Read more.
Although the microbial communities from seminal fluid were an unexplored field some decades ago, their characteristics and potential roles are gradually coming to light. Therefore, a complex and specific microbiome population with commensal niches and fluctuating species has started to be revealed. In fact, certain clusters of bacteria have been associated with fertility and health, while the outgrowth of several species is potentially correlated with infertility indicators. This constitutes a compelling reason for outlining the external elements that may induce changes in the seminal microbiome composition, like lifestyle factors, gut microbiota, pathologies, prebiotics, and probiotics. In this review, we summarize the main findings about seminal microbiome, its origins and composition, its relationship with fertility, health, and influence factors, while reminding readers of the limitations and advantages introduced from technical variabilities during the experimental procedures. Full article
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14 pages, 2657 KiB  
Review
The Evolving Landscape of Male Varicocele Pathophysiology in the Era of Multi-Omics: A Narrative Review of the Current Literature
by Carlos Munoz-Lopez, Anne Wong, Kieran Lewis, Raevti Bole, Sarah C. Vij and Scott D. Lundy
Biology 2024, 13(2), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology13020080 - 28 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1779
Abstract
Male-factor infertility is implicated in over half of the millions of cases of infertility worldwide, and varicoceles are the most common correctable cause of male-factor infertility. The pathophysiologic mechanism for varicoceles is complex and next-generation technologies offer promising insights into the molecular underpinnings [...] Read more.
Male-factor infertility is implicated in over half of the millions of cases of infertility worldwide, and varicoceles are the most common correctable cause of male-factor infertility. The pathophysiologic mechanism for varicoceles is complex and next-generation technologies offer promising insights into the molecular underpinnings of this condition. In this narrative review, we highlight historical and contemporary paradigms associated with varicoceles, with an emphasis on the biological underpinnings of this disease. Specifically, we review the literature describing the underlying causes of varicoceles, discuss the molecular and cellular mechanisms causing pathological changes in some (but not all) men, and highlight key articles regarding the next-generation analyses (e.g., transcriptome, epigenome, proteome, and microbiome) being applied to better understand the condition and its treatment. These data demonstrate an ongoing evolution of the knowledge of varicoceles and the potential for improved personalized care in the future for men with this condition. Full article
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