Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 31033

Special Issue Editors

Behavioral Sciences Department, Faculty of Medicine, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Iasi, 700115 Iasi, Romania
Interests: behavioral sciences; medical psychology; chronic diseases; child psychology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” Iasi, Romania
Interests: clinical psychology; chronic disease; rehabilitation of the patient; cognitive and behavioral therapy; post-traumatic stress; burnout

Special Issue Information

Researchers and academics are invited to contribute with studies in the field of clinical psychology that have an impact on public health (mental health, behavior problems, adverse childhood experiences, substance use, stress and burnout, eating or sleeping disorders, addictions, etc.). We encourage studies that focus on psychological problems of vulnerable individuals or groups that can become a public health issue (e.g., chronic diseases). Authors could also contribute studies that present the need for training psychologists and doctors to deal with psychological/medical problems to diminish the negative impacts on public health (through continuing education, university curricula, etc.)

We are interested in methods of intervention, psychotherapy, and treatment of various problems experienced by contemporary humans (families, groups, or communities from different cultures); crisis situations; critical incidents; and multidisciplinary approaches having a psychological, medical, social, cultural, and ethical perspective.

Professor Dr. Magdalena Iorga

Professor Dr. Camelia Soponaru

Guest Editors

Prof. Magdalena Iorga
Prof. Dr. Camelia Soponaru
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • • psychology health • public health • mental health • stress • burnout • vulnerable population • substance use • sleeping disorders • eating disorders • adverse childhood experiences • chronic diseases • medical ethics

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 937 KiB  
Article
Sense of Relational Entitlement and Couple Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Couple Negotiation Tactics
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13060467 - 03 Jun 2023
Viewed by 923
Abstract
Previous research shows a link between the sense of relational entitlement and various couple outcomes. However, the mechanisms linking these variables are less discussed. With this study, the aim was to test the associations between individuals’ excessive and restricted sense of relational entitlement [...] Read more.
Previous research shows a link between the sense of relational entitlement and various couple outcomes. However, the mechanisms linking these variables are less discussed. With this study, the aim was to test the associations between individuals’ excessive and restricted sense of relational entitlement and their levels of couple satisfaction and conflict. In addition, it was tested whether the use of different negotiation tactics (cooperative and competitive) mediated the links. Six hundred and eighty-seven adults (55.2% women) participated in this study. Mediation analyses showed that a restricted sense of relational entitlement is associated with couple satisfaction and conflict through higher competitive negotiation use. Additionally, an excessive sense of relational entitlement is linked with couple satisfaction and conflict through lower cooperative negotiation use. This study has important implications for couples therapy addressing satisfaction issues, showing why and when educating couple interactions, especially those regarding negotiation, can improve relational functioning. Additionally, one’s relational well-being is strongly related to one’s mental health, and the applicability of the findings can be extended to all outcomes of the therapeutic process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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8 pages, 241 KiB  
Article
Correlations among Psychological Resilience, Cognitive Fusion, and Depressed Emotions in Patients with Depression
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13020100 - 25 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1455
Abstract
Background: More than 300 million people worldwide suffer from depression, which is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease. This study investigated the factors influencing psychological resilience and cognitive fusion in patients with depression and the relationships of psychological resilience and [...] Read more.
Background: More than 300 million people worldwide suffer from depression, which is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease. This study investigated the factors influencing psychological resilience and cognitive fusion in patients with depression and the relationships of psychological resilience and cognitive fusion with depression. Methods: This study enrolled 172 participants (65.8% of them were female). Psychological resilience, cognitive fusion, and depression were assessed with the psychological resilience scale, the cognitive fusion questionnaire, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), respectively. Furthermore, the relationships of psychological resilience and cognitive fusion with depression were investigated. Results: The psychological resilience and cognitive fusion scores of patients with depression varied significantly among different education levels, and HAMA, HAMD, and SDS scores were significantly negatively correlated with psychological resilience but positively correlated with cognitive fusion. Conclusions: Depression levels in patients with depression are closely related to psychological resilience and cognitive fusion. Therefore, anxiety and depression could be alleviated by improving the psychological resilience or reducing the cognitive fusion of patients with depression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
16 pages, 320 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Importance of Gender, Family Affluence, Parenting Style and Loneliness in Cyberbullying Victimization and Aggression among Romanian Adolescents
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 457; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12110457 - 17 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1947
Abstract
The increasing phenomenon of cyberbullying among adolescents needs parental, educational, and social intervention. The study aimed to identify the prevalence of cyberbullying among Romanian adolescents and the importance of gender, family-related factors, self-esteem, and parental styles in both victims and perpetrators. A total [...] Read more.
The increasing phenomenon of cyberbullying among adolescents needs parental, educational, and social intervention. The study aimed to identify the prevalence of cyberbullying among Romanian adolescents and the importance of gender, family-related factors, self-esteem, and parental styles in both victims and perpetrators. A total of 835 adolescents aged 10–19 years were included in the research. An online questionnaire was specially constructed for this research, gathering socio-demographic and family-related data along with information about cyberbullying as a victim, aggressor, or bystander, and strategies used in order to deal with it. Four psychological scales were used to evaluate self-esteem, loneliness, cybervictimization/cyberaggression, and parental style. (3) Results showed that the most common age for a personal smartphone is M = 10.24 ± 2.43. The main reasons why students use these networks are primarily chatting and fun and less for academic tasks. During the week, adolescents spend 5.53 ± 2.75 h on social media, while during weekends, the duration of smartphone usage almost doubles. Girls are the most common victims of cyberbullying, and less than three-quarters of students believe that aggressors can be both girls and boys, and only a quarter of them have reported an incident. Family affluence, the relationship with parents and classmates, the presence of loneliness and sociodemographic factors were found to be in a strong relationship with the presence of aggression and/or victimization among adolescents. Cyberaggression was found to be positively correlated with the aggressive parental style and negatively correlated with the compassionate and avoidant parental styles. Results are crucial for identifying cyberbullying actors and preventing the negative effects of cyberbullying on psychological, social, and academic life for students, parents, and teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
12 pages, 809 KiB  
Article
Attachment and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: The Mediatory Role of Emotion Awareness
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(10), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12100405 - 21 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1691
Abstract
Attachment seems to influence depression through emotion regulation. However, no study has yet examined the mediatory role of emotion awareness, a particular subset of emotion regulation abilities, in the relationship between attachment and depressive problems in early and middle adolescence. The aim of [...] Read more.
Attachment seems to influence depression through emotion regulation. However, no study has yet examined the mediatory role of emotion awareness, a particular subset of emotion regulation abilities, in the relationship between attachment and depressive problems in early and middle adolescence. The aim of this study is to examine the direct and indirect effects of attachment on depressive symptoms in adolescence, considering the mediatory role of emotion awareness dimensions. A sample of adolescents (n = 223) filled up self-report questionnaires on attachment, emotion awareness and depression. Serial mediation models suggest direct effects on depression: negative for secure attachment and positive for anxious/ambivalent attachment. Anxious/ambivalent attachment has a positive indirect effect through lower differentiation of emotions. Both secure and anxious/ambivalent attachment have indirect positive effects on depression through the sequence of bodily unawareness and differentiation of emotions. Differentiating emotions has a central role in mediating the relationship between attachment and depressive symptoms, and the lack of bodily awareness of emotions contributes to such mediation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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17 pages, 2601 KiB  
Article
Relationships between Individual and Social Resources, Anxiety and Depression in the Early Lockdown Stage by the COVID-19 in Chile
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(10), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12100357 - 25 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1663
Abstract
The coronavirus disease has exposed the population to psychosocial threats that could increase mental health problems. This research analyzed the relationships between emotional states (negative [−EWB] and positive [+EWB] experienced well-being), personal resources (resilient coping [RC]), dispositional resources (control beliefs about stress [BAS]), [...] Read more.
The coronavirus disease has exposed the population to psychosocial threats that could increase mental health problems. This research analyzed the relationships between emotional states (negative [−EWB] and positive [+EWB] experienced well-being), personal resources (resilient coping [RC]), dispositional resources (control beliefs about stress [BAS]), and social resources (social support [SS]), and anxiety and depressive symptoms in a sample of the Chilean population (n = 592), who answered an online questionnaire. Multiple and moderated multiple regression analyses were carried out. Depressive symptoms showed a positive relationship with −EWB (β = 0.805; p < 0.001) and negative relationship with +EWB (β = −0.312; p < 0.001), RC (β = −0.089; p < 0.01), BAS (β = −0.183; p < 0.001) and SS (β = −0.082; p < 0.001). Anxiety symptoms showed a positive relationship with −EWB (β = 0.568; p < 0.001), and a negative relationship with +EWB (β = −0.101; p < 0.03) and BAS (β = −0.092; p < 0.001). BAS moderated the relationship between experienced well-being and depression symptoms, and RC moderated the relationship between experienced well-being with both depression and anxiety symptoms. Findings confirm the buffering effect of personal and dispositional resources when facing a sanitary and social crisis. Moreover, they help to understand the role of internal psychological processes during a crisis and how to cope with life-threatening events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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12 pages, 312 KiB  
Article
The Importance of Positive Psychological Factors among People Living with HIV: A Comparative Study
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(8), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12080288 - 15 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1233
Abstract
We aim to identify the differences in psychological well-being, resilience, and coping strategies between healthy subjects and HIV patients. The design followed in this work was empirical, not experimental, and cross-sectional with a correlational objective. The sample included a total of 399 participants [...] Read more.
We aim to identify the differences in psychological well-being, resilience, and coping strategies between healthy subjects and HIV patients. The design followed in this work was empirical, not experimental, and cross-sectional with a correlational objective. The sample included a total of 399 participants (199 patients with HIV and 200 without pathology). The instruments applied for data collection were as follows: a questionnaire on socio-demographic data, the Psychological Well-being Scale, the Resilience Scale and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire. The study period was from February 2018 to January 2020. Patients with HIV had a significantly lower score than healthy subjects, in the resilience factors of perseverance and self-confidence. Subjects with HIV scored less in all dimensions of psychological well-being, with the exception of the dimension of autonomy. Finally, it was observed that HIV-positive subjects used rational coping strategies less frequently than healthy subjects, based on social support seeking and problem-solving coping. However, HIV patients scored higher in emotional coping strategies than healthy individuals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
12 pages, 1132 KiB  
Article
Adaptation of an Emotional Stroop Test for Screening of Suicidal Ideation in Portugal
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(8), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12080281 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2734
Abstract
Cognitive instruments, especially those with emotional components, may be useful to address the limitations of self-report scales commonly used to assess suicidal ideation. The aim of this study was to develop an emotional Stroop test for screening suicidal ideation in Portugal. The project [...] Read more.
Cognitive instruments, especially those with emotional components, may be useful to address the limitations of self-report scales commonly used to assess suicidal ideation. The aim of this study was to develop an emotional Stroop test for screening suicidal ideation in Portugal. The project was developed in five phases using different samples for each phase. The first two phases were focused on the formulation of the potential words that would compose the slides. For this purpose, five biology teachers (neutral slide) and five mental health professionals (positive and negative slides) were invited to help choose the words that were most representative for each slide. The third phase validated the words defined in the previous phase. In this phase, 300 university students participated (Mage = 21.66; SD = 3.67; 68% female). They rated the words on a Likert scale in terms of their frequency of use, familiarity, level of understanding, and degree of image evocation. In the fourth phase, the researchers developed the complete version of the test, which consists of three slides with neutral, positive, and negative emotional stimuli, consecutively. Finally, in the fifth phase, we validated the final version of the test through a comparative study between a clinical group and a non-clinical group, each one composed by 50 participants (Mage = 32; SD = 9.70; 55% female). Results indicated that the clinical group demonstrated significantly higher scores for depression and suicidal ideation and lower scores for the three Stroop tasks. Words related to negative emotions were strongly correlated with suicidal ideation. Finally, the three Stroop slides explained 74.1% of the variance in suicidal ideation. These findings suggest that this test can be a viable complementary measure in the psychological assessment of suicide ideation, and intervention in the field of suicide prevention in Portugal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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11 pages, 468 KiB  
Article
Mediating Effect of Psychological Process Variables on the Relationship between Dysfunctional Coping and Psychopathologies: A Comparative Study on Psychopathologies during COVID-19
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 206; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12070206 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1974
Abstract
The COVID-19 crisis has had repercussions on global mental wellbeing. This study aimed: (1) to identify the mediating role of psychological process variables, namely psychological mindedness, psychological mindfulness, and psychological inflexibility on the relationship between dysfunctional coping and psychopathologies in Indonesian undergraduate students [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 crisis has had repercussions on global mental wellbeing. This study aimed: (1) to identify the mediating role of psychological process variables, namely psychological mindedness, psychological mindfulness, and psychological inflexibility on the relationship between dysfunctional coping and psychopathologies in Indonesian undergraduate students subjected to national quarantine orders throughout July, 2020 and (2) to compare the level of anxiety, depression, and anxiety between Indonesian and Malaysian undergraduate students. A cross-sectional study was performed with 869 Indonesian undergraduate students from Nahdlatul Ulama University of Surabaya (UNUSA) and 515 undergraduate students from Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS). The BIPM, MAAS, AAQ-I, DASS-21, and Brief COPE were used to assess the research variables. The proportion who scored “moderate” and above for depression, anxiety, and stress were 20.2%, 25.0%, and 14.2%, respectively, in Malaysian samples and 22.2%, 35.0%, and 23.48% in Indonesian samples. In Study 1, psychological mindedness, psychological mindfulness, and psychological inflexibility significantly mediated the relationship between dysfunctional coping and psychopathologies. In Study 2, Indonesians demonstrated significantly higher anxiety and stress compared to Malaysian samples. Despite the contrasting COVID-19 situations in Malaysia and Indonesia, psychopathologies were more affected in Indonesia. Hence, our study suggests how crucial it is for mental health providers to consider promoting psychological mindedness, psychological mindfulness, and psychological flexibility to alleviate the corresponding psychopathologies among undergraduate students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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22 pages, 3112 KiB  
Article
Causal Analysis and Prevention Measures for Extreme Heavy Rainstorms in Zhengzhou to Protect Human Health
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12060176 - 02 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2079
Abstract
This study focused on the extreme heavy rainstorm that occurred in Zhengzhou in July 2021; approximately 380 people were killed or missing as a result of this storm. To investigate the evolution behaviors of this rainstorm and take corresponding prevention measures, several methods [...] Read more.
This study focused on the extreme heavy rainstorm that occurred in Zhengzhou in July 2021; approximately 380 people were killed or missing as a result of this storm. To investigate the evolution behaviors of this rainstorm and take corresponding prevention measures, several methods and models were adopted, including cloud modeling, preliminary hazard analysis (PHA), fault tree analysis (FTA), bow-tie modeling, and chaos theory. The main reasons for this rainstorm can be divided into the following three aspects: force majeure, such as terrain and extreme weather conditions, issues with city construction, and insufficient emergency rescue. The secondary disasters caused by this rainstorm mainly include urban water logging, river flooding, and mountain torrents and landslides. The main causes of the subway line-5 accident that occurred can be described as follows: the location of the stabling yard was low, the relevant rules and regulations of the subway were not ideal, insufficient attention was given to the early warning information, and the emergency response mechanism was not ideal. Rainstorms result from the cross-coupling of faults in humans, objects, the environment, and management subsystems, and the evolution process shows an obvious butterfly effect. To prevent disasters caused by rainstorms, the following suggestions should be adopted: vigorously improve the risk awareness and emergency response capabilities of leading cadres, improve the overall level of urban disaster prevention and mitigation, reinforce the existing reservoirs in the city, strengthen the construction of sponge cities, and improve the capacity of urban disaster emergency rescue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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14 pages, 967 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Personality Traits and COVID-19 Anxiety: A Mediating Model
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12020024 - 26 Jan 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3278
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has created a lot of fear and anxiety globally. The current study attempted to investigate the association among the big five personality traits and the two factors of COVID-19 pandemic anxiety (fear and somatic concern). Further, sleep quality as a [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has created a lot of fear and anxiety globally. The current study attempted to investigate the association among the big five personality traits and the two factors of COVID-19 pandemic anxiety (fear and somatic concern). Further, sleep quality as a mediator between personality traits and pandemic anxiety was also assessed. The study involved a cross-sectional sample of 296 adult Indians who were administered the 10-item short version of BFI along with the COVID-19 Pandemic Anxiety Scale and Sleep Quality Scale. Path analysis was used to test the theoretical model that we proposed. The overall model has explained 6% and 36% of the variance, respectively, for the factors of fear and somatic concern of COVID-19 pandemic anxiety. The path analysis model indicated that only the trait of neuroticism showed a significant direct and indirect effect on pandemic anxiety in the sample. Those scoring high on neuroticism indicated high levels of fear as well as somatic concern. Neuroticism also showed partial mediation through sleep quality on the factor of somatic concern. Agreeableness was the only other personality trait that indicated a significantly negative relationship with the factor of somatic concern. These relationships were independent of age, gender, and occupational status. These findings provide a preliminary insight into the slightly different relationship which has emerged between personality and COVID-19 pandemic anxiety in comparison to general anxiety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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6 pages, 1744 KiB  
Communication
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders and Functional Urinary Disorders: A Fortuitous Association?
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(6), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11060089 - 17 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4729
Abstract
Although psychological factors are known to affect bladder and bowel control, the occurrence of functional urinary disorders in patients with psychiatric disorders has not been well-studied or described. A higher prevalence of functional lower urinary tract disorders have also been reported amongst patients [...] Read more.
Although psychological factors are known to affect bladder and bowel control, the occurrence of functional urinary disorders in patients with psychiatric disorders has not been well-studied or described. A higher prevalence of functional lower urinary tract disorders have also been reported amongst patients with obsessive-compulsive (OC) disorders. A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, OVID Medline, PsycINFO, Clinical Trials Register of the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group (CCDANTR), Clinicaltrials.gov and Google Scholar databases found five observational studies on the topic. Unfortunately, as only one study had a (healthy) control group, a meta-analytic approach was not possible. Overall, patients with OC symptoms appeared to have increased occurrence of functional urinary symptoms, e.g., overactive bladder, increase in urgency, frequency, incontinence and enuresis. This was even more common amongst patients with Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS) or Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) as opposed to patients with OCD alone. Several biological and behavioural mechanisms and treatment approaches were discussed. However, as the current evidence base was significantly limited and had moderate to serious risk of bias, no strong inferences could be drawn. Further well-designed cohort studies are necessary to better elucidate the observed associations and their management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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14 pages, 530 KiB  
Article
DAT1 and Its Psychological Correlates in Children with Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study
Behav. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs11010009 - 14 Jan 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2533
Abstract
International research has underlined the role played by children’s and maternal psychopathological symptoms on the onset of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) in early childhood. No study has considered the possible interplay between children’s dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype and methylation, dysregulation problems and [...] Read more.
International research has underlined the role played by children’s and maternal psychopathological symptoms on the onset of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) in early childhood. No study has considered the possible interplay between children’s dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype and methylation, dysregulation problems and maternal psychopathological risk. This study aimed to investigate the complex relationship between these variables, considering the possible mediation role played by children’s DAT1 methylation on the relationship between mothers’ psychopathological risk and children’s dysregulation problems, moderated by children’s DAT1 genotype. Our sample consisted of 94 early children and their mothers, divided into four subgroups, based on children’s ARFID subtypes (irritable/impulsive (I/I), sensory food aversions (SFA), post-traumatic feeding disorders subtypes (PTFD), and a non-clinical group (NC)). We addressed children’s dysregulation problems and maternal psychopathological risk, and collected children’s DNA through buccal swabs. Results showed that children’s 9/x genotype was associated with PTFD and NC groups, whereas the 10/10 genotype was associated with the SFA group, with large effect size. There were significant large differences in the study groups on children’s DAT1 total methylation, children’s dysregulation problems, and maternal psychopathological risk. Children’s DAT1 methylation did not mediate the relationship between mother’s psychopathological risk and children’s dysregulation problems, but there was a significant large direct effect. Children’s 9/x genotype moderated the relationship between maternal psychopathological risk and children’s DAT1 methylation but, respectively, with a large and small effect. Our pilot study suggested that the relationship between children’s DAT1 genotype and methylation, dysregulation problems, and maternal psychopathological risk has a crucial contribution to ARFID. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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Review

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20 pages, 1643 KiB  
Review
Traditional Chinese Medicine Body Constitutions as Predictors for Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Behav. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 423; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs12110423 - 30 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2442
Abstract
Traditional Chinese medicine body constitution (TCMBC) reflects a person’s vulnerability to diseases. Thus, identifying body constitutions prone to depression can help prevent and treat depression. The review aimed to assess and summarize the existing evidence that explores the relationship between TCMBC and depression. [...] Read more.
Traditional Chinese medicine body constitution (TCMBC) reflects a person’s vulnerability to diseases. Thus, identifying body constitutions prone to depression can help prevent and treat depression. The review aimed to assess and summarize the existing evidence that explores the relationship between TCMBC and depression. Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, MEDLINE, PubMed, CNKI, Wanfang, SinoMed, Embase, VIP, CINAHL, and CMJ were searched from inception to April 2021. Observational studies assessing the association between TCMBC and depression were selected. The quality of the included studies were assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS). Eighteen studies were included in the systematic review and thirteen in the meta-analysis. The pooled odd ratios of developing depression for Qi-stagnation, Qi-deficiency, Yang-deficiency, Yin-deficiency, and Balanced constitutions were 3.12 (95% CI, 1.80–5.40; I2 = 94%), 2.15 (95% CI, 1.54–3.01; I2 = 89%), 1.89 (95% CI, 0.71–5.03; I2 = 81%), 1.41 (95% CI, 0.91–2.20; I2 = 57%), and 0.60 (95% CI, 0.40–0.90; I2 = 94%), respectively. The findings suggest that the evaluation of a person’s TCMBC could be useful the in prevention and treatment of depression. However, more case-control and cohort studies are required to further confirm the association between TCMBC and depression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Psychology Research and Public Health)
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