Trauma, Resilience and Mental Health

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Developmental Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 4239

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Lyda Hill Institute for Human Resilience, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA
2. School of Nursing, University of Human Environments, Aichi 474-0035, Japan
Interests: trauma; stress; psychophysiological reactions of stress and trauma

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Psychiatry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH 03755-1404, USA
2. Lyda Hill Institute for Human Resilience, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA
Interests: disaster mental health; population health; evidence-based treatment; resilience in chronic stress contexts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to explore the complex interplay between trauma, resilience, and mental health. The Issue seeks to bring together the latest research and perspectives from diverse disciplines to deepen our understanding of how trauma affects mental health, and to identify effective strategies for building resilience in individuals and communities alike. We welcome manuscripts that address the following topics, including, but not limited to: (1) the impact of trauma on mental health across the lifespan; (2) the role of resilience in coping with trauma and adversity; (3) the effects of trauma on brain structure and function; (4) trauma-informed approaches to mental health care and treatment; (5) the intersection of trauma, resilience, and cultural diversity; (6) the social, economic, and political determinants of trauma and resilience; (7) innovative approaches to building resilience in individuals and communities affected by trauma; (8) the ethical and practical challenges of trauma research and practice; and (9) novel analytical approaches that can broaden the understanding of trauma, resilience, and mental health. This Special Issue will consider empirical research papers, reviews, and meta-analysis that contribute to the knowledge base of trauma, resilience, and mental health. We anticipate that this Issue will provide a platform for an interdisciplinary dialogue, stimulate innovative approaches to trauma research and practice, and promote the development of effective strategies necessary to build resilience in individuals and communities.

Dr. Kotaro Shoji
Dr. Andrew J. Smith
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • mental health
  • resilience
  • trauma
  • adversity
  • health care
  • treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 451 KiB  
Article
Empathy and Coping Strategies Predict Quality of Life in Japanese Healthcare Professionals
by Kotaro Shoji, Norihito Noguchi, Fumiko Waki, Taku Saito, Masato Kitano, Naoki Edo, Minori Koga, Hiroyuki Toda, Nobuhisa Kobayashi, Takehito Sawamura and Masanori Nagamine
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14050400 - 11 May 2024
Viewed by 605
Abstract
Burnout and secondary traumatic stress (STS), also referred to as compassion fatigue, are undeniable negative consequences experienced by healthcare professionals when working with patients. As frontline healthcare professionals are essential to communities, it is crucial to understand their mental health and how they [...] Read more.
Burnout and secondary traumatic stress (STS), also referred to as compassion fatigue, are undeniable negative consequences experienced by healthcare professionals when working with patients. As frontline healthcare professionals are essential to communities, it is crucial to understand their mental health and how they cope with negative psychological responses. This study investigated the relationships between burnout, STS, compassion satisfaction, dispositional empathy, and stress management among Japanese healthcare professionals and students taking care of patients in clinical practice. The participants were 506 Japanese healthcare professionals and students (doctors, nurses, medical students, and nursing students) affiliated with Japanese Ministry of Defense Hospitals. The data were collected from March 2020 to May 2021. We assessed burnout, STS, and compassion satisfaction using the Professional Quality of Life Scale, dispositional empathy using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, and coping with stress using the Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Inventory (Brief-COPE). Exploratory factor analysis of the Brief-COPE yielded three factors: active coping; support-seeking; and indirect coping. Personal distress, a self-oriented emotional empathy index, was related to higher burnout and STS scores and lower compassion satisfaction. Empathic concern, an other-oriented emotional empathy index, was associated with lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. Active coping strategies were associated with lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction, whereas indirect coping strategies were associated with higher burnout and STS scores. In a comparison of empathy in professional categories, nurses presented higher personal distress than nursing students, and medical doctors showed lower fantasy tendencies than medical students. These results imply the complex relationships between empathy, coping strategies, and psychological responses among healthcare professionals. Further longitudinal study is needed to explore these complex relationships and to develop more precise and effective psycho-educational interventions to prevent burnout and STS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma, Resilience and Mental Health)
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13 pages, 493 KiB  
Article
Sources of Social Support and Trauma Recovery: Evidence for Bidirectional Associations from a Recently Trauma-Exposed Community Sample
by Lauren M. Sippel, Rachel E. Liebman, Sarah K. Schäfer, Naomi Ennis, Alexandra C. Mattern, David C. Rozek and Candice M. Monson
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040284 - 29 Mar 2024
Viewed by 765
Abstract
Although the association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social support is well documented, few studies have tested the causal pathways explaining this association at several points in the acute post-trauma recovery period or examined whether the association varies for different sources of [...] Read more.
Although the association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social support is well documented, few studies have tested the causal pathways explaining this association at several points in the acute post-trauma recovery period or examined whether the association varies for different sources of social support. To address these gaps, 151 community individuals (mean age = 37.20 years, 69.5% women) exposed to trauma within the previous 6 months were recruited to complete measures of PTSD and social support from intimate partners, friends, and relatives four times in 1 year. In line with recent recommendations for research on social support and PTSD symptoms, random intercept cross-lagged panel modeling (RI-CLPM) was used to examine dynamic changes between PTSD severity and social support over time. The pattern of RI-CLPM cross-lagged coefficients indicated that positive deviations from one’s expected stable level of total social support (across all sources) sped up the recovery of PTSD symptoms at the end of the post-trauma year, and more severe PTSD symptoms than expected based on one’s expected stable level of PTSD started eroding social support midway through the assessment year. When specific sources of social support were analyzed separately, the association between within-person increases in social support from friends at any given time point accelerated the recovery from PTSD across the entire year. Among participants with intimate partners (n = 53), intimate partner support did not predict PTSD symptoms, but more severe PTSD symptoms at any given time point predicted less support at the following time point. Results from this longitudinal study provide additional support for the bidirectional relationship between PTSD and social support over time and suggest that perceived social support from friends may be especially helpful during trauma recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma, Resilience and Mental Health)
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18 pages, 266 KiB  
Article
Implementing a Multi-Disciplinary, Evidence-Based Resilience Intervention for Moral Injury Syndrome: Systemic Barriers and Facilitators
by J. Irene Harris, Shawn Dunlap, Danielle Xanthos, Jeffrey M. Pyne, Eric Hermes, Brandon J. Griffin, Susannah Robb Kondrath, Se Yun Kim, Kristin B. Golden, Nathaniel J. Cooney and Timothy J. Usset
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040281 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 750
Abstract
Moral injury syndrome (MIS) is a mental health (MH) problem that substantially affects resilience; the presence of MIS reduces responsiveness to psychotherapy and increases suicide risk. Evidence-based treatment for MIS is available; however, it often goes untreated. This project uses principles of the [...] Read more.
Moral injury syndrome (MIS) is a mental health (MH) problem that substantially affects resilience; the presence of MIS reduces responsiveness to psychotherapy and increases suicide risk. Evidence-based treatment for MIS is available; however, it often goes untreated. This project uses principles of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to assess barriers and facilitators to the implementation of Building Spiritual Strength (BSS), a multi-disciplinary treatment for MIS. Interviews were conducted with chaplains and mental health providers who had completed BSS facilitator training at six sites in the VA. Data were analyzed using the Hamilton Rapid Turnaround method. Findings included multiple facilitators to the implementation of BSS, including its accessibility and appeal to VA chaplains; leadership by VA chaplains trained in the intervention; and effective collaboration between the chaplains and mental health providers. Barriers to the implementation of BSS included challenges in engaging mental health providers and incorporating them as group leaders, veterans’ lack of familiarity with the group format of BSS, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results highlight the need for increased trust and collaboration between VA chaplains and mental health providers in the implementation of BSS and treatment of MIS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma, Resilience and Mental Health)
13 pages, 318 KiB  
Article
Appraisals of Social Trauma and Their Role in the Development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder
by Johann P. Hardarson, Berglind Gudmundsdottir, Audur G. Valdimarsdottir, Karen Gudmundsdottir, Arnrun Tryggvadottir, Kristjana Thorarinsdottir, Inga Wessman, Soley Davidsdottir, Gunnar Tomasson, Emily A. Holmes, Audur S. Thorisdottir and Andri S. Bjornsson
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 577; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13070577 - 11 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1345
Abstract
Cognitive theories of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) feature appraisal of trauma as a critical factor in the development and maintenance of the disorder. Here we explored appraisals of social trauma (severe rejection or humiliation). Participants were outpatients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and [...] Read more.
Cognitive theories of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) feature appraisal of trauma as a critical factor in the development and maintenance of the disorder. Here we explored appraisals of social trauma (severe rejection or humiliation). Participants were outpatients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) and clinically significant PTSD symptoms (PTSS) after social trauma (n = 15); two clinical control groups of either SAD (n = 32) or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; n = 13); and a control group with no diagnoses (n = 38). Measures included a clinical interview to assess social trauma and related open-ended appraisals and the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory (PTCI). Raters blind to group assignment performed content analyses of appraisals. Results showed that the PTSS group scored significantly higher than either clinical group on the PTCI SELF subscale. Only the SELF subscale predicted a diagnosis of both PTSS and SAD. All but one PTSS participant reported primarily negative beliefs about their social trauma, and the most common categories were flawed self and others are critical or cruel. Post-traumatic appraisals implicated in the course of PTSD are significant in how individuals respond to social trauma, with negative self-cognitions linked to both PTSS and SAD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trauma, Resilience and Mental Health)
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