Child Neglect and Abuse: Identification and Help-Seeking from Various Perspectives

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Social Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2360

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Social Work Department, Tel Hai Academic College, Qiryat Shemona 1220800, Israel
Interests: subjective well-being of vulnerable children; child neglect from different perspectives; child maltreatment in the neighborhood and community context

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Guest Editor
School of Education, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
Interests: youth development; at-risk youth; foster home care; residential treatment; young adults; resilience; future expectations

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Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Sapir Academic College, Sderot, Negev 7956000, Israel
Interests: child abuse and neglect; CPS; decision making; foster care; out-of-home care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Child abuse and neglect is a multifaceted phenomenon that is shaped by different perspectives. Various cultures and ethnic backgrounds can have a particular impact, as well as different personal contexts, such as gender, age, race, and socioeconomic status. These different factors play especially important roles when it comes to child abuse and neglect identification and help-seeking efforts, since they involve aspects such as definitions and norms of risks, as well as community, society roles and institutes.

We are particularly interested in material on topics such as:

  • Different perspectives on child maltreatment identification and definitions.
  • Help-seeking patterns in different communities or from diverse perspectives.
  • Child abuse and neglect identification and help-seeking in under-researched contexts (e.g., formal and non-formal educational settings, medical settings, etc.)
  • Identification of neglect by various professionals or laypersons.

Articles reviewing the recent relevant literature, as well as those based on research conducted using a range of methodologies, are welcome. This Special Issue is intended to enable the community of scholars and practitioners to become more informed about how child abuse and neglect are perceived by different cultures and contexts.

Dr. Daphna Gross-Manos
Dr. Eran Melkman
Dr. Merav Jedwab
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • child abuse and neglect
  • culture
  • context
  • diverse perspectives

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 253 KiB  
Article
“We Need to Raise Awareness and Never Give Up”: Israeli Druze and Muslim Arab Kindergarten Teachers’ Proactivity When Facing the Sexual Abuse of Their Students
by Noah Bar Gosen, Laura I. Sigad, Jordan Shaibe, Amani Halaby, Efrat Lusky-Weisrose and Dafna Tener
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020142 - 16 Feb 2024
Viewed by 767
Abstract
Kindergarten teachers are expected to lead the intervention process in cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) in their kindergarten. This study examines the proactive role of Druze and Muslim Arab kindergarten teachers in addressing and coping with the CSA of their kindergarten students [...] Read more.
Kindergarten teachers are expected to lead the intervention process in cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) in their kindergarten. This study examines the proactive role of Druze and Muslim Arab kindergarten teachers in addressing and coping with the CSA of their kindergarten students in Israel. A qualitative thematic analysis was used to investigate the semi-structured interviews conducted with eight Druze Arab and six Muslim Arab kindergarten teachers. Three distinct themes were revealed. The first theme described the participants’ fear and concern for their personal children and themselves when dealing with CSA incidents involving their students. The second and third themes described their proactive coping on two fronts: (1) inside their homes to protect their own children and (2) as educators within religious communities, using professional and religious principles to support CSA survivors and raise awareness among parents. The results emphasized the personal burden on kindergarten teachers coping with CSA in their kindergarten and, as mainly expressed by Druze kindergarten teachers, the contribution of religious values to CSA intervention and prevention processes among their students and communities. Thus, there is a need for comprehensive support that considers ethnic and religious characteristics and will be available to kindergarten teachers facing CSA in their kindergarten. Full article
14 pages, 528 KiB  
Article
Who Will Save the Savior? The Relationship between Therapists’ Secondary Traumatic Stress, Secondary Stress Self-Efficacy, and Attitudes toward Trauma-Informed Care
by Miriam Rivka Miller Itay and Maria Nicoleta Turliuc
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1012; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13121012 - 13 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Therapists who treat traumatized preschool children are vulnerable to secondary traumatic stress. This study investigates the relationship between therapists’ attitudes toward trauma-informed care (TIC) and risk of secondary traumatic stress, with secondary traumatic self-efficacy as a mediating variable. Participants included Israeli social workers [...] Read more.
Therapists who treat traumatized preschool children are vulnerable to secondary traumatic stress. This study investigates the relationship between therapists’ attitudes toward trauma-informed care (TIC) and risk of secondary traumatic stress, with secondary traumatic self-efficacy as a mediating variable. Participants included Israeli social workers (N = 101) in preschool trauma frameworks, with 97.2% following trauma-informed care principles. The questionnaire combined three instruments: attitudes related to TIC (ARTIC), secondary traumatic stress (STS), and secondary traumatic stress efficacy (STSE). Therapists with less positive attitudes toward trauma-informed care showed higher levels of secondary traumatic stress (r[99] = −0.23, p = 0.019), while more positive attitudes predicted higher levels of secondary traumatic stress efficacy (r[99] = 40, p < 0.001). Secondary traumatic self-efficacy mediated the relationship between attitudes toward trauma-informed care and secondary traumatic stress (z = 2.72, p = 0.006). Therapists’ secondary traumatic stress may be reduced by improving positive attitudes toward trauma-informed care and enhancing their secondary traumatic self-efficacy. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: The messages of Child Sexual survivors for educators and the educational system
Authors: Sigad, L. I; Tener, D; Lusky-Weisrose, E.; Roe, D.; Katz, C
Affiliation: Sigad, L. I*, Tener, D, Lusky-Weisrose, E., Roe, D. & Katz, C
Abstract: *Introduction*The present study aimed to explore CSA survivors’ experiences of their abuse in the context of the educational system, and the messages they wished to convey to educators and policy makers. *Methods* The study was based on an analysis of 61 written testimonies collected in 2020-2021 by the Israeli Independent Public Inquiry on CSA to inform policy and intervention regarding CSA. Testimonies were analyzed based on the qualitative thematic analysis approach. *Results* Educators and the educational system alike, were central components of survivors' testimonies, having various expressions: the space for the abuse itself; as both barriers or sources of support for disclosure and treatment. Survivors stressed the need for educators to receive proper training to address CSA cases, recognizing their pivotal role in children's lives and for identifying and addressing CSA cases and educating children on sexuality, rights, and safety. *Conclusions* CSA prevention, identification, and intervention are complex processes within the educational system. As educational institutions, settings, and educators themselves are significant in children’s lives, they have a crucial role to implement policies, practices and sexuality education in order to enhance children’s safety. *Policy Implications*The current findings promote moving beyond individual-level interventions to focus on improving educational institutional climates and organizational cultures as they relate to CSA, in both national and international contexts.

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