Effects of Parent–Child Relationship on Child Mental Health

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Developmental Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1962

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Counselling Psychology, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC V2Y 1Y1, Canada
Interests: perinatal and maternal mental health; maternal bonding and attachment; emotional availability; parent-child interaction; maternal identity; perinatal loss; family systems; childhood development; childhood abuse and trauma; child protection; child mental health; anxiety and depression; longitudinal research; quantitative and qualitative research; loss; grief; bereavement; attachment theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parents play a substantial role in shaping children’s emotional and mental health. A positive connection between parent and child facilitates the provision of care by the parent, as well as the maintenance of an affective environment in which the child feels safe to explore, learn, and develop age‐appropriate autonomy. This positive relationship between parent and child is associated with children’s developmental outcomes, particularly in terms of mental and emotional well-being. This Special Issue aims to advance the literature on parent–child relationships and child mental health. We welcome original research in the form of reviews of the discipline; conceptual and theoretical work; applied research; translational research; program development; intervention research; longitudinal; and qualitative and/or observational designs that focus on parent–child relations and child mental health outcomes. Areas of interest include topics such as parent–child interaction, bonding, emotional availability, and attachment during pregnancy, postpartum, and childhood. Child mental health indicators and outcomes include, but are not limited to, children’s mental, emotional, and behavioral well-being and health during early-to-middle childhood and adolescence. We welcome authors to submit diverse and varied perspectives on issues including the role of partners, culture, and non-traditional family structures. Additionally, we have interest in publishing unique study designs which may elucidate causal inferences. Authors are highly encouraged to submit discussions of factors that promote resilience as related to children’s mental and emotional well-being.

Dr. Larissa Rossen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • parent–child relationship
  • child mental health
  • childhood development
  • parenting
  • children’s mental and emotional wellbeing
  • children’s behavioural development
  • adolescence
  • parent–child interaction
  • attachment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

29 pages, 676 KiB  
Review
The Research on Risk Factors for Adolescents’ Mental Health
by Jiayu Lin and Wuyuan Guo
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14040263 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1398
Abstract
There is a growing tendency for mental health disorders to emerge during adolescence. These disorders impair emotional, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, such as unsatisfying peer relationships, disruptive behavior, and decreased academic performance. They also contribute to vulnerability in later adulthood which negatively influences [...] Read more.
There is a growing tendency for mental health disorders to emerge during adolescence. These disorders impair emotional, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, such as unsatisfying peer relationships, disruptive behavior, and decreased academic performance. They also contribute to vulnerability in later adulthood which negatively influences life-long well-being. Thus, research into etiology is imperative to provide implications for prevention and intervention within family and school practices. It is suggested that the onset of psychological disorders, such as depression and anxiety, is closely related to stress levels and patterns of stress reaction. Therefore, considerable research has investigated the link between hereditary factors, economic status, dispositional vulnerability, social relationships, and stress levels. The current study examines existing evidence and identifies multifaceted risk factors for adolescents’ mental problems across three layers, including individual traits and personality, family status and practices, as well as peer relationships, and school climate. It is also suggested that factors from these three perspectives interact and are closely interconnected, directly or indirectly contributing to adolescent psychopathology. The implications for future development of prevention and intervention programs, as well as therapy, are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Parent–Child Relationship on Child Mental Health)
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