Living in a Time of Change and Uncertainty—New Developments in Applied Social Psychology

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 13578

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research and Treatment Center for Mental Health (FBZ), Ruhr University Bochum, 44787 Bochum Germany
Interests: social media; applied social psychology; positive psychology; self-regulation; social comparison theory; well-being

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Personality, Forensic Psychology and Diagnostics, University of Hagen, 58097 Hagen, Germany
Interests: applied personality and social psychology; determinants of interpersonal relationship quality; individualism; narcissism; psychopathy; forensic psycholgoy; open science

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Personality, Forensic Psychology and Diagnostics, University of Hagen, 58097 Hagen, Germany
Interests: social personality psychology; Machiavellianism; scale development and evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Applied social psychology represents the link between successful theories of social psychology and their application in everyday life, as well as their implementation in various professional fields. It also involves the use of psychological knowledge to optimize practice and solve problems effectively. 

We live in a time of change and uncertainty. New developments, new technologies, but, also, new crises arise almost on a daily basis. In the context of this Special Issue, we would like to take a closer look at these new developments and crises in order to adress the roles of fundamental and applied theories of social psychology in this context.

For our forthcoming Special Issue we are looking for contributions that focus on developments and problems of the modern world examining them from a social psychological perspective. Such topics may include, for instance, social media, streaming services, climate change, political conflicts, radicalization, individualism, diversity, fear, and consequences of war, the COVID-19 pandemic, or the spread of misinformation. All topics that currently affect society are welcome.

Dr. Phillip Ozimek
Dr. Sabrina Schneider
Dr. Christian Blötner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Behavioral Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • applied social psychology
  • change
  • uncertainty
  • social media
  • streaming
  • climate change
  • COVID-19
  • misinformation
  • individualism
  • diversity

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

23 pages, 1383 KiB  
Article
I Do Not Want to Miss a Thing! Consequences of Employees’ Workplace Fear of Missing Out for ICT Use, Well-Being, and Recovery Experiences
by Linda-Elisabeth Reimann, Carmen Binnewies, Phillip Ozimek and Sophie Loose
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14010008 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1465
Abstract
As more and more employees have access to work-related information and communication technologies (ICTs) anywhere and anytime, new challenges arise in terms of well-being and recovery experiences. Feelings of workplace fear of missing Out (wFoMO) and workplace telepressure may be personal demands that [...] Read more.
As more and more employees have access to work-related information and communication technologies (ICTs) anywhere and anytime, new challenges arise in terms of well-being and recovery experiences. Feelings of workplace fear of missing Out (wFoMO) and workplace telepressure may be personal demands that add to the literature of the job demands-resources (JD-R) theory. In this study, we proposed a model in which wFoMO and workplace telepressure were associated with employee well-being variables via the use of ICTs during leisure time. Therefore, we analyzed the data of N = 130 employees who answered two questionnaires in the interval of one work week. The results revealed negative indirect effects between wFoMO/workplace telepressure and psychological detachment/perceived stress via ICT use. The results were more ambivalent regarding the dependent variables burnout, relaxation, and control. This strengthens the literature that categorized ICT use as a job demand. However, we also found positive indirect effects on perceived informational benefits, which supports the idea of ICTs being both a job demand and a job resource in light of the JD-R theory. This study contributes to past research on work-related ICT use during leisure time and demonstrates the relevance of personal demands such as wFoMO for employees’ well-being. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1025 KiB  
Article
The 10-Item Short Form of the German Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR-G-10)—Model Fit, Reliability, and Validity
by Eva Neumann, Elke Rohmann and Heribert Sattel
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13110935 - 16 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1113
Abstract
The aim of the present work was the development and validation of a short form of the Experiences in Close Relationship Scale (ECR) in German. Three studies were conducted. In study 1, the best items for the short form were selected from the [...] Read more.
The aim of the present work was the development and validation of a short form of the Experiences in Close Relationship Scale (ECR) in German. Three studies were conducted. In study 1, the best items for the short form were selected from the item pool of the original version based on ant colony optimization (ACO), a recently developed probabilistic approach. Data from three samples collected at a university, an online portal, and a psychosomatic clinic with a total of 1470 participants were analyzed. A 10-item solution resulted, measuring avoidance and anxiety with five items each. This solution showed a good model fit and acceptable reliability in all three samples. The two new short scales were independent of each other. In study 2, the 10-item solution was validated by correlating the new short scales with external criteria. Data from previous studies that included student, community, and clinical samples were reanalyzed. Both short scales showed expected correlations with measures of romantic relationships, personality, psychopathology, and childhood trauma, indicating convergent and discriminant validity. The significant correlations were moderate to strong. In study 3, the selected ten items alone and several content-related scales were presented online to 277 participants, most of them students. The good results in terms of model fit, reliability, and validity observed in studies 1 and 2 could be replicated here. The new short form, called ECR-G-10, allows the measurement of attachment avoidance and anxiety in an economic way in research and clinical practice. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 6921 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Social Comparisons More Related to Ability vs. More Related to Opinion on Well-Being: An Instagram Study
by Phillip Ozimek, Gabriel Brandenberg, Elke Rohmann and Hans-Werner Bierhoff
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 850; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13100850 - 17 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1489
Abstract
Social networks are gaining widespread popularity, with Instagram currently being the most intensively used network. On these platforms, users are continuously exposed to self-relevant information that fosters social comparisons. A distinction is made between ability-based and opinion-based comparison dimensions. To experimentally investigate the [...] Read more.
Social networks are gaining widespread popularity, with Instagram currently being the most intensively used network. On these platforms, users are continuously exposed to self-relevant information that fosters social comparisons. A distinction is made between ability-based and opinion-based comparison dimensions. To experimentally investigate the influence of these comparison dimensions on users’ subjective well-being, an online exposure experiment (N = 409) was conducted. In a preliminary study (N = 107), valid exposure stimulus material was selected in advance. The results of the main study indicated that the exposure to ability-related social comparisons in the context of social media elicited lower well-being than exposure to opinion-related social comparisons. The theoretical and practical implications of this study consist of including the findings in clinical settings, e.g., affective disorder therapy, and the identification and reduction of ability-related content on social networking sites (SNSs). Future work should include assimilation and contrast effects which might interact with social comparison orientation and well-being. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1502 KiB  
Article
Responsibility as an Ethics and Sustainability Element during the Pandemic
by Eugenia Țigan, Monica Lungu, Oana Brînzan, Radu Lucian Blaga, Ioana Anda Milin and Simona Gavrilaș
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(7), 615; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13070615 - 24 Jul 2023
Viewed by 989
Abstract
This article addresses two perspectives of responsibility: as an element of taking action and as ethics towards one’s fellow citizens and the environment. These aspects have been used since the beginning of the pandemic. In this context, we wanted to determine the mechanism [...] Read more.
This article addresses two perspectives of responsibility: as an element of taking action and as ethics towards one’s fellow citizens and the environment. These aspects have been used since the beginning of the pandemic. In this context, we wanted to determine the mechanism that triggers increased responsibility. We have considered two possible initial processes: one external and one learned from the family in early childhood or trained/learned during studies. Based on that, three concerns were brought to our attention. First, we targeted the impact of the pandemic on respondents’ degree of responsibility for their livelihoods. Second, we wanted to determine to what extent the new situation increased the interviewee’s involvement only in some activities. The third statement called into question the causal relation between the influence of extrinsic elements on a highly educated person’s degree of responsibility. The focus group was the active population of the industrial sector in the North–West border area of Romania. The data obtained are the result of the sociological survey implementation. The people in the region were subject to several new limiting external factors. The results show that the unique challenges up to that point made them more accountable for their actions in a situation that affected them directly (pandemic). It also can be underlined that lifelong education is important in forming healthy principles of responsibility. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 305 KiB  
Article
Job Autonomy and Work Meaning: Drivers of Employee Job-Crafting Behaviors in the VUCA Times
by Ting Nie, Min Tian, Mingyang Cai and Qiao Yan
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13060493 - 12 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3254
Abstract
In the volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous environment (VUCA), employees can better match the organization and jobs by crafting their job perceptions, work tasks, and relationships, which is valuable to maintain organizational sustainable competitiveness and promote employees’ personal growth. This study explores the [...] Read more.
In the volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous environment (VUCA), employees can better match the organization and jobs by crafting their job perceptions, work tasks, and relationships, which is valuable to maintain organizational sustainable competitiveness and promote employees’ personal growth. This study explores the influence mechanisms of job autonomy and work meaning on employees’ job-crafting behaviors and the moderating effect of perceived organizational change through a survey of 318 employees in Chinese companies. The results show that job autonomy and work meaning can promote employees’ job-crafting behaviors by increasing individuals’ harmonious work passion. The indirect effects of job autonomy and work meaning on employee job-crafting behaviors through harmonious work passion are stronger for individuals with high perceived organizational change relative to those with low perceived organizational change. Organizations should concentrate on job redesign to improve employees’ job autonomy and work meaning. A climate of change should also be created within the organization to keep employees aware of the crisis. Meanwhile, employees should actively use work resources to meet the changing needs of organizational development and promote individual career development through job-crafting behaviors. Full article
14 pages, 268 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Adolescent Life Goals in Contemporary China: A Mixed-Methods Study
by Xiaofeng Wang, Rui Fu, Aruna Wu and Dan Li
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(4), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13040326 - 11 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1397
Abstract
Adolescence is a developmental period when individuals actively evaluate and construct their life goals. During the past several decades, China has transformed dramatically toward a highly competitive, market-oriented society. Despite a growing interest in exploring the implications of cultural values for youth adjustment [...] Read more.
Adolescence is a developmental period when individuals actively evaluate and construct their life goals. During the past several decades, China has transformed dramatically toward a highly competitive, market-oriented society. Despite a growing interest in exploring the implications of cultural values for youth adjustment in contemporary China, little is known about what life goals are prevalent among Chinese adolescents. This mixed-methods study aimed to identify the key themes of life goals and to examine gender, grade, and urban-rural differences in the identified themes among Chinese adolescents, using quantitative and qualitative methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of 163 middle- and high-school students in urban and rural China. Thirteen key life goal themes were identified; among them, the most mentioned themes were Family Well-being, Academic Excellence, and Personal Happiness. Quantitative results showed grade and urban-rural differences in the adolescents’ endorsement of the themes of life goals. Specifically, more middle schoolers and rural students endorsed life goals that emphasize social belonging and group well-being, whereas more high schoolers and urban students endorsed life goals that underscore individual independence and uniqueness. These results indicated the implications of social change for adolescents’ life goals in contemporary China. Full article
15 pages, 895 KiB  
Article
Age-Related Associations of Altruism with Attitudes towards COVID-19 and Vaccination: A Representative Survey in the North of Italy
by Verena Barbieri, Christian J. Wiedermann, Stefano Lombardo, Barbara Plagg, Giuliano Piccoliori, Timon Gärtner and Adolf Engl
Behav. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs13020188 - 19 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1662
Abstract
Background: During the coronavirus pandemic, altruism has been linked to personal protective behavior, vaccine development, and vaccination intention. Studies of the moderating effects of age on altruism in pandemic preparedness have not yet been conducted. Methods: A representative cross-sectional survey of residents of [...] Read more.
Background: During the coronavirus pandemic, altruism has been linked to personal protective behavior, vaccine development, and vaccination intention. Studies of the moderating effects of age on altruism in pandemic preparedness have not yet been conducted. Methods: A representative cross-sectional survey of residents of South Tyrol, Italy, was conducted in March 2021. Among the participants, 1169 were aged 18–69 years, and 257 were aged ≥ 70 years. The questionnaire collected information on sociodemographic and individual characteristics, including comorbidities, COVID-19-related experiences, trust in information, the likelihood of accepting the national vaccination plan, and altruism. A linear regression analysis was performed. Results: Among 1426 participants, the median altruism sum score was 24 (interquartile range, 20–26). In the participant group aged ≥ 70 years, the median altruism score was significantly higher than that in the younger group. Participants living in a single household were significantly less altruistic than other participants, while participants working in the health sector, living in a household at risk from coronavirus disease 2019, or suffering from a chronic disease were found to be more altruistic. Altruism showed significant positive correlations with age and agreement with the national vaccination plan and was negatively correlated with well-being. Trust in institutions was positively correlated with altruism only in the younger age group but not in the elderly. Linear regression models confirmed female gender and identified trust in institutions as a positive predictor of altruism. In the younger age group, increased well-being and restricted individual sports activities were associated with reduced altruism, whereas support of compulsory self-isolation after contact with a SARS-CoV-2-positive person and handwashing as a personal protective measure were positively associated. Conclusion: Altruism is associated with various predictors of pandemic behavior and traits. The strengths of the identified positive and negative correlations support the modifying role of age in the effects of altruism on pandemic attitudes. Interventions that are likely to enhance altruism to improve pandemic preparedness in certain age groups require further study. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

25 pages, 1062 KiB  
Review
Measuring Attributions 50 Years on: From within-Country Poverty to Global Inequality
by Franco Bastias, Nadja Peter, Aristobulo Goldstein, Santiago Sánchez-Montañez, Anette Rohmann and Helen Landmann
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14030186 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 892
Abstract
Fifty years after Feagin’s pioneering 1972 study, we present a systematic review of the measurement of attributions for poverty and economic inequality. We conducted a search for articles published from 1972 to 2023 in APA PsycArticles, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, APA PsycInfo, [...] Read more.
Fifty years after Feagin’s pioneering 1972 study, we present a systematic review of the measurement of attributions for poverty and economic inequality. We conducted a search for articles published from 1972 to 2023 in APA PsycArticles, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, APA PsycInfo, PSYNDEX Literature with PSYNDEX Tests, and Google Scholar. We used the following English keywords: “poor”, “poverty”, “inequality”, “attribution”, and “attributions” and their equivalents in Spanish. Applying our inclusion and exclusion criteria led to a final sample of 74 articles. We report three main findings. First, the majority of studies classify attributions on the dimensions of individualistic vs. structural. Second, there is a clear tendency to measure attributions for domestic poverty without considering supranational factors or poverty as a global challenge. Third, studies focus almost exclusively on poverty rather than (economic) inequality. We identify potential for future development within the literature, namely, from a domestic to a global perspective, from locus to controllability, and from poverty to inequality. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop