The Association between Visual Attention and Memory

A special issue of Behavioral Sciences (ISSN 2076-328X). This special issue belongs to the section "Cognition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1070

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33314, USA
Interests: visual attention; working memory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Working memory enables the short-term storage of information no longer available to the senses from the external world. Simple measures of this cognitive process correlate reliably and accurately with measures of cognitive ability. For this reason, working memory is central to many neuropsychological batteries measuring intelligence and diagnosing cognitive impairment.

It is evident that selective attention is critical for the initial encoding of information into working memory. More recently, however, research has focused on questions related to how attention can prioritize the items already stored in memory, ignore distraction or update the contents of memory. While these functions of attention are crucial for maintaining remembered items, it is debated to what extent these forms of attention overlap. This Special Issue will focus on ways in which these forms of attention can be independently investigated to help illuminate the contributions of attention to working memory performance.

Dr. Summer Sheremata
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • working memory
  • visual attention
  • executive attention
  • retro-cue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 1449 KiB  
Article
Pitch Improvement in Attentional Blink: A Study across Audiovisual Asymmetries
by Haoping Yang, Biye Cai, Wenjie Tan, Li Luo and Zonghao Zhang
Behav. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs14020145 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 794
Abstract
Attentional blink (AB) is a phenomenon in which the perception of a second target is impaired when it appears within 200–500 ms after the first target. Sound affects an AB and is accompanied by the appearance of an asymmetry during audiovisual integration, but [...] Read more.
Attentional blink (AB) is a phenomenon in which the perception of a second target is impaired when it appears within 200–500 ms after the first target. Sound affects an AB and is accompanied by the appearance of an asymmetry during audiovisual integration, but it is not known whether this is related to the tonal representation of sound. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of audiovisual asymmetry on attentional blink and whether the presentation of pitch improves the ability to detect a target during an AB that is accompanied by audiovisual asymmetry. The results showed that as the lag increased, the subject’s target recognition improved and the pitch produced further improvements. These improvements exhibited a significant asymmetry across the audiovisual channel. Our findings could contribute to better utilizations of audiovisual integration resources to improve attentional transients and auditory recognition decline, which could be useful in areas such as driving and education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Association between Visual Attention and Memory)
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