Urban VOC Emission, Transport, and Chemistry (VOC/ETC)

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 23 August 2024 | Viewed by 1617

Special Issue Editors

School of Atmospheric Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhuhai 519082, China
Interests: source profile; source apportionment; emission inventory validation
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Guest Editor
Institute for Environmental and Climate Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 511443, China
Interests: vertical observations of atmospheric boundary layer pollutants; ozone pollution studies
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Guest Editor
Institute for Environmental and Climate Research, Jinan University, Guangzhou 511443, China
Interests: volatile organic compounds; eddy covariance; urban flux

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) comprise a broad spectrum of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), and other organic compounds. The reactive species contribute significantly to the formation of ground-level ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which in turn affects the regional and global climate. Some species are toxic, meaning that they pose adverse effects on human health. Urban VOCs can be emitted from both anthropogenic sources such as vehicles, solvents, fossil fuel burning, and various industrial processes, as well as biogenic counterparts like plants and trees. Characterizations of VOC source emission, physical transport, and chemical fate are essential to elucidate their impacts on atmospheric pollution episodes, including photochemical smog and haze.

In this Special Issue, we welcome the submission of papers focusing on VOC emission, transport, and chemistry (ETC) in the urban environment. The topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, VOC measurement and modeling, emission accounting, source apportionment, atmospheric transport, and chemical transformation.

Dr. Ziwei Mo
Dr. Xiaobing Li
Dr. Yibo Huangfu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • urban VOCs
  • emission inventory
  • source apportionment
  • chemical reaction
  • flux measurement
  • VOC modeling
  • ozone
  • aerosol
  • secondary pollution

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 4097 KiB  
Article
A Year-Long Measurement and Source Contributions of Volatile Organic Compounds in Nanning, South China
by Ying Wu, Zhaoyu Mo, Qinqin Wu, Yongji Fan, Xuemei Chen, Hongjiao Li, Hua Lin, Xishou Huang, Hualei Tang, Donglan Liao, Huilin Liu and Ziwei Mo
Atmosphere 2024, 15(5), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15050560 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 425
Abstract
Severe ozone (O3) pollution has been recorded in China in recent years. The key precursor, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), is still not well understood in Nanning, which is a less developed city compared to other megacities in China. In this study, [...] Read more.
Severe ozone (O3) pollution has been recorded in China in recent years. The key precursor, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), is still not well understood in Nanning, which is a less developed city compared to other megacities in China. In this study, a year-long measurement of VOCs was conducted from 1 October 2020 to 30 September 2021, to characterize the ambient variations and apportion the source contributions of VOCs. The daily-averaged concentration of VOCs was measured to be 26.4 ppb, ranging from 3.2 ppb to 136.2 ppb across the whole year. Alkanes and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) were major species, contributing 46.9% and 25.2% of total VOC concentrations, respectively. Propane, ethane, and ethanol were the most abundant in Nanning, which differed from the other significant species, such as toluene (3.7 ppb) in Guangzhou, ethylene (3.8 ppb) in Nanjing, and isopentane (5.5 ppb), in Chengdu. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model resolved six source factors, including vehicular emission (contributing 33% of total VOCs), NG and LPG combustion (19%), fuel burning (17%), solvent use (16%), industry emission (10%), and biogenic emission (5%). This indicated that Nanning was less affected by industrial emission compared with other megacities of China, with industry contributing 12–50%. Ethylene, m/p-xylene, butane, propylene, and isoprene were key species determined by ozone formation potential (OFP) analysis, which should be priority-controlled. The variations in estimated OFP and observed O3 concentrations were significantly different, suggesting that VOC reactivity-based strategies as well as meteorological and NOx effects should be considered collectively in controlling O3 pollution. This study presents a year-long dataset of VOC measurements in Nanning, which gives valuable implications for VOC control in terms of key sources and reactive species and is also beneficial to the formulation of effective ozone control strategies in other less developed regions of China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban VOC Emission, Transport, and Chemistry (VOC/ETC))
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20 pages, 4357 KiB  
Article
Investigating Vertical Distributions and Driving Factors of Black Carbon in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Measurements in Shanghai, China
by Hanyu Wang and Changhai Huang
Atmosphere 2023, 14(10), 1472; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos14101472 - 23 Sep 2023
Viewed by 733
Abstract
Black carbon (BC) is a significant component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5, with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 2.5 μm), and its spatial distribution greatly affects the global radiation budget. However, the vertical distributions and key driving factors of BC in the atmospheric [...] Read more.
Black carbon (BC) is a significant component of fine particulate matter (PM2.5, with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 2.5 μm), and its spatial distribution greatly affects the global radiation budget. However, the vertical distributions and key driving factors of BC in the atmospheric boundary layer, where BC is mostly concentrated, remain unclear. In this study, gradient measurements of BC were made using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform from ground level to 500 m above ground level (AGL) during and after the 2016 G20 control period in Shanghai. Generally, vertical profiles of BC from local time (LT) 9 to 17 on all experimental days demonstrated an upward trend with increasing height. The BC emitted from chimneys was initially released at higher altitudes, resulting in the positive gradients of vertical BC profiles. Furthermore, with the progressive development of the boundary layer height from LT 9 to 15, the average concentration of BC per vertical profile decreased. However, meteorological conditions unfavorable for dispersions caused by particularly high temperatures, low wind speed, unfavorable boundary layer conditions, or especially high relative humidity, and hygroscopic growth owing to the extremely high relative humidity, led to an overall increase in vertical BC and ground-based PM2.5 and BC. Despite the impact of adverse meteorological conditions, emission control measures during the control period not only effectively decreased the BC concentration but also reduced the proportion of BC in PM2.5 in the atmospheric boundary layer. The results of this study can provide valuable observations for evaluating numerical model results and important implications for making control strategies of BC in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban VOC Emission, Transport, and Chemistry (VOC/ETC))
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