Reactive Nitrogen and Halogen in the Atmosphere

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1105

Special Issue Editor

Institute of Environment and Ecology, Tsinghua Shenzhen International Graduate School, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: emissions and impacts of reactive halogen and nitrogen; atmosphere–land–ocean interactions; atmospheric chemistry modelling; emission inventory; air pollution formation and control

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reactive nitrogen and halogen play important roles in atmospheric chemistry, and affect air pollution and the climate. For instance, reactive nitrogen and halogen significantly affect the atmosphere’s oxidizing capacity, which determines the removal of primary pollutants and the formation of secondary pollutants, as well as the lifetime of greenhouse gases (i.e., methane). In polluted regions particularly, reactive nitrogen and halogen species exhibit relatively higher abundances, and their impacts are more pronounced.

As reactive nitrogen and halogen are attracting increasing attention, this Special Issue aims to collect original research and review papers on the most recent findings on reactive nitrogen and halogen. It is particularly important for us to have a more in-depth understanding of atmospheric processes—including anthropogenic and natural emissions, and chemical transformation, transportation, and removal mechanisms—to better quantify the impacts of reactive nitrogen and halogen in the atmosphere. Studies containing field measurements, laboratory experiments, box/regional/global model simulations, remote sensing, and technological developments are welcome. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The emission sources of reactive nitrogen and halogen;
  • The atmospheric chemistry of reactive nitrogen and halogen;
  • The impacts of reactive nitrogen and halogen in the atmosphere;
  • The development of technology and methods for measuring and modelling reactive nitrogen and halogen.

Dr. Xiao Fu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • reactive nitrogen
  • reactive halogen
  • anthropogenic and natural nitrogen sources
  • anthropogenic and natural halogen sources
  • atmospheric nitrogen chemistry
  • atmospheric halogen chemistry
  • reactive nitrogen impacts
  • reactive halogen impacts

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 5189 KiB  
Article
Quantifying Urban Daily Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Satellite Observations
by Tao Tang, Lili Zhang, Hao Zhu, Xiaotong Ye, Donghao Fan, Xingyu Li, Haoran Tong and Shenshen Li
Atmosphere 2024, 15(4), 508; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15040508 - 21 Apr 2024
Viewed by 914
Abstract
Urban areas, characterized by dense anthropogenic activities, are among the primary sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx), impacting global atmospheric conditions and human health. Satellite observations, renowned for their continuity and global coverage, have emerged as an effective means to quantify pollutant [...] Read more.
Urban areas, characterized by dense anthropogenic activities, are among the primary sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx), impacting global atmospheric conditions and human health. Satellite observations, renowned for their continuity and global coverage, have emerged as an effective means to quantify pollutant emissions. Previous bottom-up emission inventories exhibit considerable discrepancies and lack a comprehensive and reliable database. To develop a high-precision emission inventory for individual cities, this study utilizes high-resolution single-pass observations from the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) on the Sentinel-5 Precursor satellite to quantify the emission rates of NOx. The Exponentially Modified Gaussian (EMG) model is validated for estimating NOx emission strength using real plumes observed in satellite single-pass observations, demonstrating good consistency with existing inventories. Further analysis based on the results reveals the existence of a weekend effect and seasonal variations in NOx emissions for the majority of the studied cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactive Nitrogen and Halogen in the Atmosphere)
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