Characteristics and Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols (2nd Edition)

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Aerosols".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 27 September 2024 | Viewed by 1982

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
Interests: secondary organic aerosol; biomass burning; gasoline vehicles; source apportionment; anthropogenic
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in Power Engineering, School of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093, China
Interests: source emission; secondary organic aerosol; chemical evolution mechanism; mass spectrometry; gas-phase organic compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is the second volume of the series of publications dedicated to "Characteristics and Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols” (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/atmosphere/special_issues/509W9YP1R6) published in Atmosphere in 2023.

Secondary organic aerosols (SOAs), formed from the multigenerational oxidation of gaseous precursors, account for a major proportion of submicron particles. They can directly or indirectly affect air quality, climate change and human health. However, current atmospheric models usually underestimate the measured SOAs due to missing precursors, formation mechanisms and the uncertainty in SOA yield. Although great efforts have been made in the last few decades, a great discrepancy still exists in the modeled and measured SOAs due to the complexity of the precursors and formation mechanisms. There are many factors that may affect SOA formation, many of which may act synergistically or competitively. Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish the chemical and physical properties of SOAs, both from gas-phase precursors and from particle-phase evolution as a function of atmospheric conditions such as RH, temperature and aerosol acidity. A better understanding of the SOA formation mechanisms and characteristics will help to improve the prediction of aerosol loading and help mitigate air pollution around the world. The aim of this Special Issue is to present recent advances in the field of SOA formation. This topic encompasses SOA precursors from different sources, generated SOAs, and SOA follow-up effects.

For this Special Issue, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Chemical components of precursors and their contribution to SOAs
  • Chemical and physical characterization of SOAs in different environments
  • Formation and evolution mechanisms of SOAs
  • SOA formation from different sources
  • Distribution and characterization of different SOA precursors
  • The environmental impact and health effects of SOAs

Dr. Rongzhi Tang
Dr. Wenfei Zhu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • secondary organic aerosol
  • source apportionment
  • chemical evolution mechanism
  • source emission
  • semi-volatile/intermediate-volatility organic compounds

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 2254 KiB  
Article
Effect of Relative Humidity on the Rate of New Particle Formation for Different VOCs
by Austin C. Flueckiger and Giuseppe A. Petrucci
Atmosphere 2024, 15(4), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15040480 - 12 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei, which affect both climate and human health. In pristine environments, oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a major contributor to NPF. However, the impact of [...] Read more.
Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei, which affect both climate and human health. In pristine environments, oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a major contributor to NPF. However, the impact of relative humidity (RH) on NPF from these precursors remains poorly understood. Herein, we report on NPF, as inferred from measurements of total particle number density with a particle diameter (dp) > 7 nm, from three VOCs (sabinene, α-terpineol, and myrtenol) subjected to dark ozonolysis. From a series of comparative experiments under humid (60% RH) and dry (~0% RH) conditions and a variety of VOC mixing ratios (ξVOC, parts per billion by volume, ppbv), we show varied behavior in NPF at elevated RH depending on the VOC and ξVOC. In general, RH-dependent enhancement of NPF at an ξVOC between <1 ppbv and 20 ppbv was observed for select VOCs. Our results suggest that gaseous water at particle genesis enhances NPF by promoting the formation of low-volatility organic compound gas-phase products (LVOCs). This is supported by measurements of the rate of NPF for α-pinene-derived SOA, where RH had a greater influence on the initial rate of NPF than did ξVOC and ξO3. Full article
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20 pages, 378 KiB  
Review
Review of Smog Chamber Experiments for Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation
by Hyun Kim, Dahyun Kang, Heon Young Jung, Jongho Jeon and Jae Young Lee
Atmosphere 2024, 15(1), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos15010115 - 18 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1090
Abstract
In this study, we reviewed smog chamber systems and methodologies used in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation studies. Many important chambers across the world have been reviewed, including 18 American, 24 European, and 8 Asian chambers. The characteristics of the chambers (location, reactor [...] Read more.
In this study, we reviewed smog chamber systems and methodologies used in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation studies. Many important chambers across the world have been reviewed, including 18 American, 24 European, and 8 Asian chambers. The characteristics of the chambers (location, reactor size, wall materials, and light sources), measurement systems (popular equipment and working principles), and methodologies (SOA yield calculation and wall-loss correction) are summarized. This review discussed key experimental parameters such as surface-to-volume ratio (S/V), temperature, relative humidity, light intensity, and wall effect that influence the results of the experiment, and how the methodologies have evolved for more accurate simulation of atmospheric processes. In addition, this review identifies the sources of uncertainties in finding SOA yields that are originated from experimental systems and methodologies used in previous studies. The intensity of the installed artificial lights (photolysis rate of NO2 varied from 0.1/min to 0.40/min), SOA density assumption (varied from 1 g/cm3 to 1.45 g/cm3), wall-loss management, and background contaminants were identified as important sources of uncertainty. The methodologies developed in previous studies to minimize those uncertainties are also discussed. Full article
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