Chemical and Biological Sensors Applied to Environment and Health

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 July 2021) | Viewed by 5084

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Tecnología de Sensores Avanzados (SENSAVAN), Instituto de Tecnologías Físicas y de la Información (ITEFI), CSIC, Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Interests: chemical and biological sensors; electronic noses; nanomaterials; sensor technology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sensors for measuring and detecting chemical and biological substances have been employed for a long time. In particular, chemical sensors have been developed, some with a general purpose, others—the most part—for a defined application. The recent progresses of this analytical technology (of low cost, simple handling, objective, and not invasive) in sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility, and feasibility, are due to the use of microelectronic, microfluidic, and nano-technologies and to new signal-processing methods which have led to a greater integration of these systems for many applications for which portability is essential in order to measure compounds in situ and in real time in a non-destructive manner. For this Special Issue, applications of chemical and biological sensors in health and environment are of interest.

Research papers focused on the detection of toxic pollutants in the environment and on biomarkers to diagnose different diseases are invited.

Therefore, this Special Issue will collect research and review articles covering, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Nanostructured sensors (nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanowires) and RGO sensors
  • Design and optimization of chemical and biological sensors
  • Toxic agents (CO, NO2, O3, and VOCs) sensing in the real air (atmosphere and industry)
  • Chemical sensors and biosensors for early detection of diseases (cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) for VOC and protein sensing, respectively
  • Biological sensors for pathogenic agents (bacteria, virus, etc.)
  • Modern microfluidic systems to use with these types of sensors
  • New pattern recognition methods to improve the classification and validation of data analysis for these types of sensors
  • Smart systems

Prof. Dr. M. Carmen Horrillo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • chemical sensors
  • biosensors
  • contamination
  • diseases
  • microfluidics
  • nanotechnology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1943 KiB  
Article
Glassy Carbon Electrochemical Sensor for Gallic and Vanillic Acid Detection in Aqueous Solutions
by Dimitrios Zagoraios, Charis Ioakeimidis, Georgios Kyriakou and Alexandros Katsaounis
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(17), 8045; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11178045 - 30 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2029
Abstract
In the present study, an inexpensive and practical way to detect phenolic compounds in wastewater was investigated. By using a simple one compartment three-electrode cell and performing cyclic voltammetry measurements, it was possible to quantitatively determine the presence of gallic and vanillic acid [...] Read more.
In the present study, an inexpensive and practical way to detect phenolic compounds in wastewater was investigated. By using a simple one compartment three-electrode cell and performing cyclic voltammetry measurements, it was possible to quantitatively determine the presence of gallic and vanillic acid in acidic aqueous solutions due to their electrooxidation upon potential scanning. In the case of gallic acid, two oxidation peaks were observed whereas the vanillic acid cyclic voltammograms consisted of two oxidation and one reduction peaks. Correlation of the observed electrooxidation current density value with the concentration of each phenolic compound led to a linear relationship. Following the above methodology for a 1:1 mixture of these phenols, it was found that only a qualitative analysis was possible rather than a quantitative one. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical and Biological Sensors Applied to Environment and Health)
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13 pages, 1623 KiB  
Article
Immunochromatographic System for Serodiagnostics of Cattle Brucellosis Using Gold Nanoparticles and Signal Amplification with Quantum Dots
by Dmitriy V. Sotnikov, Lyubov V. Barshevskaya, Anatoly V. Zherdev, Saule Z. Eskendirova, Kassym K. Mukanov, Kanatbek K. Mukantayev, Yerlan M. Ramankulov and Boris B. Dzantiev
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(3), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10030738 - 21 Jan 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2537
Abstract
In this article, we describe an immunochromatographic test system developed for rapid serodiagnostics of cattle brucellosis using two markers: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and quantum dots (QDs). The test system was compared with immunochromatographic serodiagnostics systems that use only one marker. The approbation of [...] Read more.
In this article, we describe an immunochromatographic test system developed for rapid serodiagnostics of cattle brucellosis using two markers: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and quantum dots (QDs). The test system was compared with immunochromatographic serodiagnostics systems that use only one marker. The approbation of the test system was conducted on samples of cattle sera with low, but diagnostically significant titers of specific antibodies. We show that when two conjugates are used, the intensity of the detectable signal increases by 2–3 times compared with the test system using the QD conjugate and by more than nine times compared with the system using the GNP conjugate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical and Biological Sensors Applied to Environment and Health)
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