Synthetic, Natural and Natural-Synthetic Hybrid Magnetic Structures: Technology and Application

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2021) | Viewed by 3957

Special Issue Editor

Department of Micro and Nanoelectronics, Saint Petersburg Electrotechnical University “LETI”, 197022 Saint Petersburg, Russia
Interests: magnetic composites; radio-wave absorbing materials; electromagnetic measurements; sol–gel; nanomaterials; theranostics; superparamagnetism; magnetic nanoparticles; biomineralization; magnetosomes; continuous flow synthesis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This issue is devoted to the study of magnetic structures, including magnetic nanoparticles, of three main classes: synthetic structures, natural structures, and hybrid natural–synthetic structures. It covers aspects of classical and modern soft chemistry techniques used to obtain magnetic structures such as the sol–gel process and continuous flow synthesis in microfluidic chip reactors. Automated synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is the only step to the biomineralization processes occurring in bacterial magnetosomes; thus, these natural ferrimagnets have attracted a great amount of scientific interest to the mechanisms providing such high chemical and crystallinity perfection. The yield of bacterial magnetosomes is very low, and the created bioreactors do not allow industrial-scale production of magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical and other applications. For this reason, hybrid structures consisting of natural and synthetic components are also of interest. To understand the physical and chemical mechanisms determining the magnetic properties of such structures, the issue also addresses theoretical modeling tasks. Finally, the practical use of these magnetic structures in solving technical and biomedical problems is also considered.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  1. Magnetotactic bacteria, being in nature, cultivation, isolation of magnetosomes;
  2. Features of physical and chemical properties and magnetic state of magnetosomes;
  3. Magnetic structures based on natural magnetic ores, their study, and possible applications;
  4. Synthetic magnetic structures, including nature-like and biomimetic;
  5. Hybrid magnetic structures based on synthetic and natural components for microwave absorption, biomedicine, and other applications;
  6. Micromagnetic modeling of natural, synthetic, and hybrid magnetic structures;
  7. New methods of synthesis and study of magnetic structures.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Kamil Gareev
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • soft chemistry
  • sol–gel
  • continuous flow synthesis
  • natural ferrimagnets
  • biomineralization
  • magnetotactical bacteria
  • magnetosomes
  • natural–synthetic magnetic structures
  • theoretical modeling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 32940 KiB  
Article
Controlled Release of Tazarotene from Magnetically Responsive Nanofiber Patch: Towards More Efficient Topical Therapy of Psoriasis
by Natália Andrýsková, Paul Sourivong, Melánia Babincová and Mária Šimaljaková
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(22), 11022; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112211022 - 21 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1642
Abstract
Electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers with embedded magnetic nanoparticles were developed for use in the topical delivery of antipsoriatic drugs. To test a hydrophobic drug, a tazarotene has been used, which is an efficient retinoid derivative. Such a smart hyperthermia nanofiber system with self-generated heat [...] Read more.
Electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers with embedded magnetic nanoparticles were developed for use in the topical delivery of antipsoriatic drugs. To test a hydrophobic drug, a tazarotene has been used, which is an efficient retinoid derivative. Such a smart hyperthermia nanofiber system with self-generated heat from the incorporated magnetic nanoparticles induced drug release in response to on–off switching of alternating magnetic fields for the delivery of tazarotene through the skin, as quantified using Franz cells. This highly efficient external field-controllable system with minimal skin irritation could create a new avenue for the topical therapy of psoriasis. Full article
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13 pages, 2444 KiB  
Article
A Theoretical Analysis of Magnetic Particle Alignment in External Magnetic Fields Affected by Viscosity and Brownian Motion
by Andrej Krafcik, Peter Babinec, Oliver Strbak and Ivan Frollo
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(20), 9651; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11209651 - 15 Oct 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1770
Abstract
The interaction of an external magnetic field with magnetic objects affects their response and is a fundamental property for many biomedical applications, including magnetic resonance and particle imaging, electromagnetic hyperthermia, and magnetic targeting and separation. Magnetic alignment and relaxation are widely studied in [...] Read more.
The interaction of an external magnetic field with magnetic objects affects their response and is a fundamental property for many biomedical applications, including magnetic resonance and particle imaging, electromagnetic hyperthermia, and magnetic targeting and separation. Magnetic alignment and relaxation are widely studied in the context of these applications. In this study, we theoretically investigate the alignment dynamics of a rotational magnetic particle as an inverse process to Brownian relaxation. The selected external magnetic flux density ranges from 5μT to 5T. We found that the viscous torque for arbitrary rotating particles with a history term due to the inertia and friction of the surrounding ambient water has a significant effect in strong magnetic fields (range 1–5T). In this range, oscillatory behavior due to the inertial torque of the particle also occurs, and the stochastic Brownian torque diminishes. In contrast, for weak fields (range 5–50μT), the history term of the viscous torque and the inertial torque can be neglected, and the stochastic Brownian torque induced by random collisions of the surrounding fluid molecules becomes dominant. These results contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of magnetic particle alignment in external magnetic fields and have important implications in a variety of biomedical applications. Full article
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