Applications of Analytical Chemistry in Food Science

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2024 | Viewed by 566

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Chemistry Department, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e della Basilicata, 71121 Foggia, Italy
Interests: food safety; food science and technology; analytical chemistry; analytical methods development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e della Basilicata, 71121 Foggia, Italy
Interests: analytical chemistry; food irradiation; food safety; multi-residue analysis; GC-MS; HPLC-HRMS; volatolomics; lipidomics; chemometrics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e della Basilicata, 71121 Foggia, Italy
Interests: analytical chemistry; analytical methods development for food safety and quality; food safety controls

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Analytical chemistry is the basis of studies on the composition and safety of foodstuffs. During the last decades, the possibility of investigating, with increasing accuracy and selectivity, the main chemical components of food, thanks to the use of increasingly advanced analytical techniques, has made it possible to significantly improve the quality of agri-food production, as well as to develop new products that increasingly meet the demand and requests of consumers. Analytical techniques such as spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, and liquid and gas chromatographic techniques, coupled with various types of detectors, are the most historically used approaches, and, although largely replaced by new analytical approaches over the last few years, they still represent a very valid alternative for a series of analytical determinations, thanks to their robustness and versatility.

Over the past decades, the introduction of mass spectrometry, coupled with chromatographic techniques, made it possible to substantially improve some analytical aspects, such as the sensitivity and selectivity of response. Raman, IR, and NIR spectroscopies represent other analytical applications that have recently found wide applications, especially in the field of food characterization and traceability.

Metabolomics, as one of the “omics” technologies, involving the high-throughput study and characterization of metabolites in several systems, including food matrices, deserves special attention. Food metabolites are typically affected by various factors such as species, environment, processing methods, and storage techniques. The variations in these metabolites will directly influence food safety and quality; thus, the use of the metabolomic approach allows the monitoring of metabolite changes during food processing, along with the identification of markers and the optimization of food-processing procedures.

Finally, volatolomics, a branch of “omics” sciences used for the characterization of the volatolome, defined as the volatile fraction of the metabolome at a given time in a given environment, is a new frontier of food science studies. This approach finds applications in multiple fields of research thanks to sophisticated analytical techniques combined with advanced chemometric analyses.

The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:

  • Analytical chemistry in food quality determinations;
  • Analytical chemistry in food safety assurance;
  • Analytical chemistry in food traceability;
  • Analytical chemistry in novel food formulation;
  • Spectroscopy and spectrophotometry in food analysis;
  • Chromatographic approaches in food analysis;
  • Mass spectrometry in food analysis;
  • Omics approaches in food analysis;
  • Chemometrics in food analysis;
  • Quality control and validation procedures in food analysis.

Dr. Marco Iammarino
Dr. Rosalia Zianni
Prof. Dr. Igor Tomasevic
Dr. Annalisa Mentana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chromatography
  • chemometrics
  • food quality and safety
  • IR
  • lipidomics
  • mass spectrometry
  • NIR
  • novel food
  • omics
  • proteomics
  • spectroscopy
  • spectrophotometry
  • Raman
  • traceability
  • volatolomics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 1516 KiB  
Article
Effect of Sample Presentation on the Classification of Black Soldier Fly Larvae Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
by C. Mendez Sanchez, S. Alagappan, L. Hoffman, O. Yarger and D. Cozzolino
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3841; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093841 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 415
Abstract
Black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) (Hermetia illucens) reared on food waste streams are considered a sustainable source of protein in feed livestock diets. Recently, portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) instruments have been assessed to monitor the consistency and quality of food waste [...] Read more.
Black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) (Hermetia illucens) reared on food waste streams are considered a sustainable source of protein in feed livestock diets. Recently, portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) instruments have been assessed to monitor the consistency and quality of food waste streams used to feed black soldier fly larvae. During the application of NIR spectroscopy, sample presentation (e.g., drying, processing, particle size) plays an important role in the accuracy of the models developed (quantitative or qualitative analysis). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of sample presentation (number of larvae used during the scanning of BSFL) on the accuracy of classification models developed to trace the food waste stream (e.g., supermarket of childcare) used to feed the larvae. BSFL samples were sourced from two waste streams and scanned as half, 1, 2, or 3 larvae using an NIR portable instrument (MicroNIR, Viavi, Milpitas, California, USA). Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) were used to analyze the NIR data and to classify the samples according to the waste stream. The main differences in the NIR spectra of the BSFL samples associated with the number of larvae scanned were observed around 1200 nm, mainly associated with the C-H overtones (lipids). The classification results showed that high classification rates (>93%) were obtained regardless of the number of larvae scanned, ranging from 93% (using 0.5 larvae) to 100% (using 1, 2, or 3 larvae samples). Overall, the number of larvae scanned had minimal to no effect on the accuracy of the LDA classification models. The present study demonstrated that a portable NIR instrument can be suitable for an initial rapid classification or determination of the origin of the waste stream used to feed the BSFL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Analytical Chemistry in Food Science)
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