Bioenergy and Bioproducts from Biomass and Waste

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical and Molecular Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 1811

Special Issue Editor

Chemical Engineering Department, University of Vigo, 36005 Pontevedra, Spain
Interests: chemical engineering; extraction methods; bioproducts; biomaterials; biodiesel
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invasive-alien species and non-native species represent a serious risk to the biodiversity of an area. One of the most significant affectations of natural ecosystems is biological invasion, which represents a threat to biodiversity conservation. Due to globalization and the expansion-annexation of territories, the presence of non-native species has become increasingly common. These species must be eliminated to facilitate the expansion of native species.

Biomass waste can be transformed into energy and/or clean fuels through a variety of technologies; however, it is interesting to try to previously obtain value-added products and, after the recovery of the waste, transform it into energy

The circular bioeconomy is a model of production, distribution, and consumption in which the value of products, materials, and other resources remain as long as possible. Recent initiatives, such as the European Green Pact (EC, 2019), confirm the expected role of the BEC in the European Union of the future, as well as in each of its regions. The biorefinery model and the obtaining of larger compounds of different degrees of value through productive cascade approaches must be intensively developed.

The main objective of this Special Issue (SI) is to promote the use of any biomass waste, or invasive plants to obtain value-added products and energy. It is essential to carry out the recovery of waste at the territorial level and develop measures to facilitate its minimization and reuse, with experiences aimed at zero waste policy.

Prof. Dr. María Ángeles Cancela Carral
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • invasive-alien species
  • waste
  • clean technology
  • bioproduct
  • biomaterial
  • bioenergy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 7246 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of High-Precision Sub-Micron CaCO3 Anticancer Drug Carriers from Coral Remains
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041336 - 06 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles have attracted increasing attention as a promising material for drug delivery systems. In this study, coral remains were utilized as a raw material for a novel drug carrier. A series of pre-treatment and parameter experiments were conducted [...] Read more.
Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles have attracted increasing attention as a promising material for drug delivery systems. In this study, coral remains were utilized as a raw material for a novel drug carrier. A series of pre-treatment and parameter experiments were conducted to synthesize sub-micron spherical CaCO3 particles. The CaCO3 particles exhibited uniform size distribution, with the minimum mean size being only 344 nm. The effects on the CaCO3 crystal phases and particle sizes were also discussed in this study. Drug loading experiments were also conducted to assess the feasibility of the CaCO3 drug carrier. We loaded TRITC-Dextran into CaCO3 particles for the simulation experiments. The loading capacity reached up to 9.6 wt.%, which was as high as common drug carriers such as liposomes. In this study, we aimed not only to tackle the local environmental issues caused by coral remains, but also to synthesize a suitable drug carrier for cancer therapy using the outstanding properties and low cost of CaCO3. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy and Bioproducts from Biomass and Waste)
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17 pages, 4529 KiB  
Article
Continuous Adsorption of Acid Wood Dyes onto an Activated Carbon Prepared from Pine Sawdust
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020841 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 576
Abstract
In this paper, an activated carbon obtained from Pinus radiata sawdust is applied to remove blue, red, and black wood dyes from aqueous solutions in a fixed-bed column. The flow rate (7.7–30.8 mL min−1), initial dye concentration (25–500 mg L−1 [...] Read more.
In this paper, an activated carbon obtained from Pinus radiata sawdust is applied to remove blue, red, and black wood dyes from aqueous solutions in a fixed-bed column. The flow rate (7.7–30.8 mL min−1), initial dye concentration (25–500 mg L−1), and bed height (2–4 cm) highly influence the breakthrough-curves’ features. The results indicate that the adsorption capacity increased by decreasing the flow rate and increasing the initial dye concentration, except for the black dye, and increasing bed height, except for the red dye. In addition, the breakthrough time changed by modifying the studied variables. The curves became steeper as the flow rate increased and as the bed height decreased. Also, by increasing the inlet dye concentration, the breakthrough time decreased significantly, and sharper breakthrough curves were obtained. The activated carbon with a surface area of 2826 m2 g−1 led to high values of the adsorption capacity between 150 and 1300 mg g−1. The Yoon–Nelson and Thomas models were the ones that best described the adsorption data. The activated carbon saturated with black dye could be used in three successive cycles after regeneration with H2O2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy and Bioproducts from Biomass and Waste)
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24 pages, 15447 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Cellulose Derived from Invasive Alien Species Plant Waste for Application in the Papermaking Industry: Physic-Mechanical, Optical, and Chemical Property Analysis
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(20), 11568; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132011568 - 23 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 651
Abstract
This study examines the potential of four invasive plant species, both arboreal and herbaceous, within the riparian forest of the Umia River in Galicia, a common ecosystem in northern Spain. These invasive species (Arundo donax, Phytolacca americana, Eucalyptus globulus, [...] Read more.
This study examines the potential of four invasive plant species, both arboreal and herbaceous, within the riparian forest of the Umia River in Galicia, a common ecosystem in northern Spain. These invasive species (Arundo donax, Phytolacca americana, Eucalyptus globulus, and Tradescantia fluminensis) were collected and assessed for their suitability as an alternative source of pulp and paper materials for the paper industry to mitigate the environmental impacts associated with conventional cellulose fiber production from harmful monocultures. Cellulosic material from leaves, bark, and/or stems of each of the selected species was isolated from lignin and hemicelluloses through kraft pulping processes. Resulted fibers and pulps were analyzed visually, morphologically, chemically, and mechanically to evaluate their papermaking properties. To compare these properties with those of commercially available pulp, test sheets were concurrently produced using commercial bleached Eucalyptus cellulose. The findings reveal that the employed fibers exhibit promising characteristics for artistic paper production. Regarding the pulp, two refining times were tested in a PFI machine, and the Schopper–Riegler degree was measured. Paper sheets underwent various tests to determine thickness, basis weight, apparent volume, apparent density, permeability, and chemical composition, as well as microscopic optical and morphological properties. The fibers obtained from the waste derived from the removal of invasive exotic species and biodiversity control present a viable and intriguing alternative for decentralized paper production, yielding noteworthy results for the creative sector. This research highlights the potential of harnessing invasive species for sustainable and innovative paper manufacturing practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy and Bioproducts from Biomass and Waste)
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