Research and Development in Orthopaedic Biomechanics

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2024) | Viewed by 4597

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Research & Technology Hellas (CERTH), 38333 Volos, Greece
Interests: soft tissue biomechanics; computational biomechanics; mechanics of medical devices; micromechanics; mechanics of materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of orthopaedic biomechanics is a rapidly evolving area of research and development that significantly contributes to the understanding, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders.

This Special Issue aims to highlight new knowledge in this field with a focus on applying computational models, experimental methods, and advanced imaging techniques to investigate the biomechanics and mechanobiology of musculoskeletal tissues at all scales, orthopaedic devices, and the interaction of tissues with devices.

One area of focus in orthopaedic biomechanics is the development of more accurate and realistic computational models to simulate the behaviour of the musculoskeletal system and orthopaedic devices under different loading conditions. These models can be used to study the biomechanics of healthy and diseased joints, and to predict the outcome of various surgical interventions.

Another area of interest in orthopaedic biomechanics is the development of experimental techniques to measure the mechanical properties of musculoskeletal tissues and orthopaedic devices. These techniques can provide valuable insights into the behaviour of tissues and devices under different loading conditions, and can help to identify the mechanical factors that contribute to the onset and progression of musculoskeletal disorders.

Finally, orthopaedic biomechanics research is increasingly focused on translating these advances into clinical practice, with the goal of improving the treatment and management of musculoskeletal disorders. This includes the development of new surgical techniques, implants, prosthetics, orthotics, and rehabilitation protocols that are tailored to the individual needs of patients.

Dr. Leonidas Spyrou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • medical devices
  • medical imaging
  • tissue mechanics and mechanobiology
  • mechanical testing
  • numerical simulation
  • implant
  • orthotic
  • prosthetic
  • musculoskeletal modelling
  • motion analysis

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

11 pages, 951 KiB  
Article
Playing Football as a Risk Factor for Lower Leg Malalignment?—Comparing Lower Leg Axis of Male Adolescent Football Players and Referees
by Clemens Memmel, André Denzlein, Dominik Szymski, Lorenz Huber, Leonard Achenbach, Stephan Gerling, Volker Alt, Werner Krutsch and Matthias Koch
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(13), 7928; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13137928 - 6 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1225
Abstract
The prevalence of varus knee malalignment among junior and adult football players (FP) has proven to be higher compared to other sports. No causal relationship has yet been found, as genu varum can be assumed to be an independent risk factor for the [...] Read more.
The prevalence of varus knee malalignment among junior and adult football players (FP) has proven to be higher compared to other sports. No causal relationship has yet been found, as genu varum can be assumed to be an independent risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to compare knee alignment measurements and sport-specific data of adolescent football players and referees (REF). Knee alignment was detected by measuring the intercondylar/intermalleolar distance (ICD/IMD) as well as the Hip–Knee–Ankle angle (HKA) using a standardized digital frontal-plane photograph. Anthropometric and sports-related data (training/match exposure, seasons actively played, etc.) were collected by means of questionnaires (Clinical trial registration number: DRKS00020446). A total of 28 male FP and 29 male adolescent REF were included in the survey. The mean age was 17.4 ± 0.7 years. The two groups did not differ significantly in age, height, weight, BMI, and overall football/refereeing exposure per week (FP vs. REF: 274 vs. 285 min/week, p = 0.61). The HKA of the FP was significantly lower (toward varus) than that of the REF (177.6° ± 2.4° vs. 179.0° ± 2.4°; p < 0.001). However, ICD did not significantly differ (FP: 17 ± 25 mm, REF: 13 ± 27 mm; p = 0.55). The football environment with frequent football exposure seems to have an influence on leg axis deviation in FP compared to REF. For prevention of knee osteoarthritis in FP, an advanced understanding of leg axis development in adolescent players is essential and, therefore, needs further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Orthopaedic Biomechanics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2392 KiB  
Article
Taylor Spatial Frame Behavior in High Tibial Osteotomies: A Clinical–Mechanical Study
by Nikolaos Karamanis, Alexis T. Kermanidis, Leonidas A. Spyrou, Konstantinos Bargiotas, Sokratis Varitimidis, Nikolaos Aravas and Konstantinos N. Malizos
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(6), 3837; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13063837 - 17 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1560
Abstract
The introduction of Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) in clinical practice allows for unique capabilities in long bone deformity corrections; however, a comprehensive understanding of its mechanical characteristics and their impact on callus formation at the osteotomy site is still unclear. The current study [...] Read more.
The introduction of Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF) in clinical practice allows for unique capabilities in long bone deformity corrections; however, a comprehensive understanding of its mechanical characteristics and their impact on callus formation at the osteotomy site is still unclear. The current study is concerned with the clinical application of TSF in high tibial osteotomy (HTO) and the mechanical testing of this device. Fifty-five (55) patients with symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis and varus deformity underwent open-wedge HTO with the use of TSF and were prospectively monitored with regard to callus formation pattern at the site of osteotomy. Clinical evaluation revealed that the callus formation pattern was eccentric in all patients. In addition, the experimental results from mechanical testing of a clinically relevant TSF configuration indicate, that vertical deflection of the upper bone part during weight-bearing is accompanied by a rotation of the bone axis, which acts in the same direction to the rotation applied during the clinical correction process. The complementary contributions of the deformity correction process and the mechanical response of the TSF under compressive loads, lead to asymmetric gap closure, which promotes the eccentric callus formation in the osteotomy site. The study provides useful information for clinical decision-making regarding callus formation process when TSF external fixator is applied in HTOs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Orthopaedic Biomechanics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

20 pages, 2157 KiB  
Review
A Critical Review of Human Jaw Biomechanical Modeling
by Marco De Stefano and Alessandro Ruggiero
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3813; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093813 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 344
Abstract
The human jaw is a complex biomechanical system involving different anatomical components and an articulated muscular system devoted to its dynamical activation. The numerous actions exerted by the mandible, such as talking, eating or chewing, make its biomechanical comprehension absolutely indispensable. To date, [...] Read more.
The human jaw is a complex biomechanical system involving different anatomical components and an articulated muscular system devoted to its dynamical activation. The numerous actions exerted by the mandible, such as talking, eating or chewing, make its biomechanical comprehension absolutely indispensable. To date, even if research on this topic has achieved interesting outcomes using in vitro testing, thanks to the development of new apparatus and methods capable of performing more and more realistic experiments, theoretical modeling is still worthy of investigation. In light of this, nowadays, the Finite Element Method (FEM) approach constitutes certainly the most common tool adopted to investigate particular issues concerning stress–strain characterization of the human jaw. In addition, kinematics analyses, both direct and inverse, are also diffuse and reported in the literature. This manuscript aimed to propose a critical review of the most recurrent biomechanical models of the human mandible to give readers a comprehensive overview on the topic. In light of this, the numerical approaches, providing interesting outcomes, such as muscular activation profiles, condylar forces and stress–strain fields for the human oral cavity, are mainly differentiated between according to the joint degrees of freedom, the analytical descriptions of the muscular forces, the boundary conditions imposed, the kind of task and mandible anatomical structure modeling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Orthopaedic Biomechanics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

10 pages, 2819 KiB  
Case Report
Three-Dimensional Printed Custom-Made Prostheses after Partial Scapulectomy: A Case Report
by Giuseppe Bianchi, Maria Grazia Benedetti, Roberta Bardelli, Daniela Platano, Roberta Laranga and Gianmarco Tuzzato
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 7056; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13127056 - 12 Jun 2023
Viewed by 948
Abstract
This case study focuses on scapula reconstruction using three-dimensional printing in a patient with low-grade osteosarcoma. Malignant tumors originating from the scapula often lead to destructive surgery, with poor functional status and quality of life for the patients. Using custom prosthetic technology through [...] Read more.
This case study focuses on scapula reconstruction using three-dimensional printing in a patient with low-grade osteosarcoma. Malignant tumors originating from the scapula often lead to destructive surgery, with poor functional status and quality of life for the patients. Using custom prosthetic technology through three-dimensional printing could be a possible solution for reconstruction with greater long-term functional outcomes. This study aims to assess the functional outcomes of the reconstruction. A 39-year-old patient with low-grade central osteosarcoma involving the lateral two-thirds of the scapula underwent a custom prosthetic reconstruction. The patient subsequently followed a rehabilitation protocol for 12 months. The results indicate that even though there was a slight decrease in the range of movement, and an increase in the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, no relevant increase in activities of daily living (ADL) disability was present at follow-up. The patient returned to carry out his daily activities without pain and with a minimal functional reduction in movement. In conclusion, three-dimensional prosthetic reconstruction is a valid alternative for scapula reconstruction, allowing excellent functional and aesthetic results in oncological cases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research and Development in Orthopaedic Biomechanics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop