Systemic and Local Salivary Glands Involvement — from Diagnosis to Treatment

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 2735

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Oral Surgery and Periodontology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 61-812 Poznan, Poland
Interests: oral pathology; maxillofacial surgery; oral and maxillofacial surgery; oral surgery; oral diseases; salivary glands; xerostomia saliva as a clinical monitor

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of the Ministry of Interior, Wojska Polskiego 51, 25-375 Kielce, Poland
Interests: fluoride metabolism; maxillofacial traumatology; oral health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Risk Group Dentistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-812 Poznan, Poland
Interests: oral health; oral behaviors; oral health literacy; dental health; special care dentistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Salivary glands and changes observed within them may not only result from local pathologies including benign and malignant tumors, inflammatory lesions and congenital anatomical defects, and bacterial and viral infections, but they are also a frequent manifestation of systemic diseases of a diverse nature. Changes in the salivary glands are found in endocrine, neurological, and autoimmune diseases and nutritional disorders. Some of these pathologies are reflected in altered salivary gland architectonics and induce specific changes on histopathological examination. Others can be detected by genetic testing or quantitative or qualitative saliva testing. In recent years, there has been a rapid development of diagnostic methods for salivary glands including radiological, ultrasound, endoscopic, genetic, salivary gland biopsy, and saliva studies focusing on the search for specific salivary markers. Unfortunately, some diagnostic methods have high sensitivity with low specificity for selected salivary gland pathologies. Consequently, a specific image in a diagnostic test does not bring clinicians closer to establishing a certain diagnosis and implementing dedicated treatment. It also often does not allow confidently distinguishing salivary gland lesions of systemic origin from local lesions involving the gland itself or all salivary glands. Hence, proper differential diagnosis of these pathological changes and the selection of sensitive and specific diagnostic methods become particularly important. Reliable and specific diagnosing will be helpful in implementing effective treatment.

The purpose of the Special Issue is to present and comprehensively evaluate diagnostic methods and treatments of the salivary glands, with particular emphasis on their indications in selected pathologies of the salivary glands and limitations in their use.

Dr. Katarzyna Błochowiak
Dr. Maciej Sikora
Prof. Dr. Karolina Gerreth
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • salivary glands diagnosing
  • salivary gland biopsy
  • sialometry
  • salivary biomarkers
  • ultrasonography of salivary glands
  • sialoendoscopy
  • salivary glands
  • sialadenitis
  • radiology of salivary glands

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

8 pages, 772 KiB  
Communication
Left–Right Multimodal Morphometric Comparison of Human Submandibular Glands
by Bojan V. Stimec and Dejan Ignjatovic
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 2474; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14062474 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 459
Abstract
This communication study integrates composite multimodal research on postmortem human submandibular glands, based on macromorphometry. The normal ductographic sialograms were pairwise analyzed using linear morphometry, whole-gland planimetry and fractal properties, such as main duct length, caliber and tortuosities, side branches and accessory ducts/lobes. [...] Read more.
This communication study integrates composite multimodal research on postmortem human submandibular glands, based on macromorphometry. The normal ductographic sialograms were pairwise analyzed using linear morphometry, whole-gland planimetry and fractal properties, such as main duct length, caliber and tortuosities, side branches and accessory ducts/lobes. All the examined parameters presented a significant correlation, i.e., symmetry between the left and the right submandibular glands. The morphometric data presented can serve as a valuable reference in clinical practice. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1345 KiB  
Article
Development and Proposal of a Novel Scoring System to Classify Dry Mouth Severity
by Julie Frigaard, Håvard Hynne and Janicke Liaaen Jensen
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(21), 11758; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132111758 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1160
Abstract
Dry mouth is a common complaint with unmet treatment needs, reflected by the fact that more than 500 trials are registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. Comparisons across studies, however, are difficult as inclusion criteria vary widely. Additionally, the terms xerostomia and hyposalivation are often not [...] Read more.
Dry mouth is a common complaint with unmet treatment needs, reflected by the fact that more than 500 trials are registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. Comparisons across studies, however, are difficult as inclusion criteria vary widely. Additionally, the terms xerostomia and hyposalivation are often not separated. Thus, the aim of the present work was to develop a dry mouth severity score (DMSS) that incorporates published questionnaires and measures both xerostomia and hyposalivation and proposes a grading system that can be used as a common basis for inclusion into clinical trials. The DMSS was developed through the use of data from patients in the Dry Mouth Clinic, University of Oslo, Norway. Five groups of patients (n = 131) and controls (n = 59) were included: primary Sjögren’s syndrome, non-Sjögren’s syndrome, radiated head and neck cancer, psychiatry, and controls. The proposed DMSS includes five parameters with corresponding cut-off values given 1 point (p) each: the General Xerostomia Question ≥ 2, Summated Xerostomia Inventory ≥ 11, Clinical Oral Dryness Score ≥ 6, and secretion of unstimulated and chewing-stimulated whole saliva with cut-off values at ≤0.1 mL/min and ≤0.7 mL/min, respectively. The proposed score range for DMSS is 0–3, where score 0 corresponds to 0p, score 1 to 1–2p, score 2 to 3p, and score 3 to 4–5p. In the patient group, 65% had a high DMSS of 2 or 3, while 78% of the controls scored 0. The sensitivity and specificity were high (0.93 and 0.78, respectively), and the internal reliability was satisfactory (Cronbach’s alpha 0.80). The proposed DMSS represents a novel method to uniformly classify dry mouth patients for applicable comparison between clinical trials. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 303 KiB  
Article
Reduced Salivary Flow Rate and Increased Caries Susceptibility in Italian Children in Remission from Hematological Malignancy
by Patrizia Defabianis, Lucilla Bello and Federica Romano
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(18), 10434; https://doi.org/10.3390/app131810434 - 18 Sep 2023
Viewed by 725
Abstract
Salivary gland dysfunction is an underestimated oral late effect of chemotherapy in childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the salivary functioning and dental caries experience in Italian CSSs and age- and gender-matched healthy children. A [...] Read more.
Salivary gland dysfunction is an underestimated oral late effect of chemotherapy in childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the salivary functioning and dental caries experience in Italian CSSs and age- and gender-matched healthy children. A total of 32 children (15 females and 17 males, age range 6–14 years) in remission from hematological malignancy and 32 healthy controls were compared for salivary parameters (stimulated whole salivary flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity) and presence of carious lesions in the primary and permanent dentition using the dmft/DMFT indexes. Significantly lower stimulated whole saliva (SWS) and pH were observed in CSS than in healthy pediatric patients (both p < 0.001), together with a higher prevalence of carious lesions on both the deciduous (p = 0.002) and permanent teeth (p = 0.015). SWS was more severely impaired in children treated with chemotherapy before 5 years of age (p < 0.001) and, in spite of the tendency to improve over time, low SWS was still observed after 5–9 years of disease remission. According to the present data, chemotherapy has a detrimental effect on salivary gland functioning, which would seem to maintain up to 9 years after antineoplastic treatment. Full article
Back to TopTop