Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antimicrobials

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Drugs".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2022) | Viewed by 20218

Special Issue Editors

1. Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
2. Pharmacy Department, University Hospitals Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
Interests: antibiotic therapy; dose optimization; pk/pd; antimicrobial tdm; augmented renal clearance; extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; critically ill
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several recent guidelines and position papers defined dose optimization as a priority for antimicrobial research in special patient populations such as critically ill patients. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is the most commonly recommended strategy to evaluate exposure and adapt dosing in critically ill patients. TDM can be used as such, or can be integrated in dosing nomograms or dosing software to optimize antimicrobial exposure, and ultimately, clinical outcome.

Whereas TDM was previously mainly performed out of concern for toxicity, there is currently a shift towards antimicrobial TDM for efficacy. For many antimicrobials, although a clear therapeutic range has been defined, the clinical benefit of TDM remains unclear. For some antimicrobials, such as most antivirals, the merit of TDM-based dose optimization is still to be defined. Several issues need to be addressed before broader antimicrobial TDM can be implemented in routine clinical ICU practice. Therefore, we encourage the submission of all papers that refine our understanding of antimicrobial TDM and its potential benefit in both adult and pediatric patients. 

This Special Issue welcomes all types of submissions (original research papers, short communications, reviews, case reports and perspectives) related to antimicrobial TDM in special patient populations such as—but not limited to—critically ill patients, children, neonates, obese patients, hematological patients, patients with cystic fibrosis, etc.

Dr. Matthias Gijsen
Prof. Dr. Karel Allegaert
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Therapeutic Drug Monitoring
  • Antimicrobial
  • Dose Optimization
  • Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics
  • Antibiotic
  • Personalised Dosing
  • Critically Ill Patients

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 199 KiB  
Editorial
Editorial for the Special Issue: “Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antimicrobials”
Antibiotics 2022, 11(6), 815; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11060815 - 17 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1510
Abstract
A recent guideline [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antimicrobials)

Research

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14 pages, 680 KiB  
Article
Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Vancomycin Continuous Infusion in Patients Treated at Home in an Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy Program
Antibiotics 2022, 11(5), 702; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050702 - 23 May 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2167
Abstract
Vancomycin is commonly used in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) of Gram-positive infections. Therapeutic drug monitoring and adverse event monitoring pose a challenge. Outcome data of vancomycin in OPAT (vOPAT) are limited. The study aim was to report the safety and efficacy of [...] Read more.
Vancomycin is commonly used in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) of Gram-positive infections. Therapeutic drug monitoring and adverse event monitoring pose a challenge. Outcome data of vancomycin in OPAT (vOPAT) are limited. The study aim was to report the safety and efficacy of a structured vOPAT program implemented in the University Hospitals Leuven. The program provides continuous elastomeric infusion of vancomycin at home with biweekly follow-up at the outpatient clinic. Demographics, clinical, biochemical and treatment parameters, target attainment parameters and clinical outcomes were recorded. An e-survey was conducted to assess patient satisfaction. Thirty-five vOPAT episodes in 32 patients were included. During 206 follow-up consultations, 203 plasma concentration measurements were registered with a median vancomycin plasma concentration of 22.5 mg/L (range 6.6–32.0). The majority of concentrations (68.5%) were within the therapeutic range (20.0–25.0 mg/L). Adverse event rates, including drug- (5.7%) and catheter-related (5.7%) events, were low. For 32 vOPAT episodes, a clinical cure rate of 100% was observed. All patients who completed the e-survey were satisfied with their vOPAT course. These findings show that a structured vOPAT program with rigorous follow-up provides safe and effective ambulatory treatment of patients with vancomycin in continuous infusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Antimicrobials)
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