Surgical Infections and Sepsis: Epidemiology, Prevention and Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotic Therapy in Infectious Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 9046

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy
Interests: emerging multi drug resistant bacteria; Infection control; new antibiotics for MDR infections
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of General and Emergency Surgery, Macerata Hospital, 62100 Macerata, Italy
Interests: surgical infections; intra-abdominal infections; healthcare-associated infections; sepsis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surgical site infections (SSI) are infections resulting from a surgical procedure and represent one of the main types of healthcare-related infections.

SSIs are classified according to the planes affected: superficial incisional SSI, deep incisional SSI, and organ/cavity SSI.

According to current guidelines, surgical drainage is the cornerstone of SSI treatment, and it can lead to a shorter duration of antibiotic therapy. However, in clinical practice, especially in the case of organ/cavity SSI, surgical reintervention is not always the golden rule.

In this scenario, real life data are lacking, so we planned this Special Issue in order to accept new publications on epidemiology, prevention and antimicrobial chemotherapy.

Moreover, submissions on sepsis, the epidemiology of surgical infections and antimicrobial resistance in COVID-19 facilitations are especially encouraged.

Dr. Antonio Riccardo Buonomo
Dr. Massimo Sartelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • SSI
  • sepsis
  • COVID-19
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • SSI epidemiology
  • SSI duration of treatment
  • SSI outcomes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 459 KiB  
Review
Update on the Management of Surgical Site Infections
by Biagio Pinchera, Antonio Riccardo Buonomo, Nicola Schiano Moriello, Riccardo Scotto, Riccardo Villari and Ivan Gentile
Antibiotics 2022, 11(11), 1608; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11111608 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6596
Abstract
Surgical site infections are an increasingly important issue in nosocomial infections. The progressive increase in antibiotic resistance, the ever-increasing number of interventions and the ever-increasing complexity of patients due to their comorbidities amplify this problem. In this perspective, it is necessary to consider [...] Read more.
Surgical site infections are an increasingly important issue in nosocomial infections. The progressive increase in antibiotic resistance, the ever-increasing number of interventions and the ever-increasing complexity of patients due to their comorbidities amplify this problem. In this perspective, it is necessary to consider all the risk factors and all the current preventive and prophylactic measures which are available. At the same time, given multiresistant microorganisms, it is essential to consider all the possible current therapeutic interventions. Therefore, our review aims to evaluate all the current aspects regarding the management of surgical site infections. Full article
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10 pages, 2227 KiB  
Case Report
Lethal Aeromonas veronii Sepsis in the Course of Medicinal Leech Therapy
by Christoph Sproll, Julian Lommen, Adriana Balasiu, Lara Schorn, Norbert R. Kübler, Birgit Henrich, Rainer Kram and Sabine Petersdorf
Antibiotics 2022, 11(9), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11091180 - 31 Aug 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1845
Abstract
A patient with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) underwent complex surgical tumor therapy, including the reconstruction of soft tissues using a radial forearm flap. Due to venous congestion that could only partly be resolved by revision surgery, leech therapy was started on the [...] Read more.
A patient with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) underwent complex surgical tumor therapy, including the reconstruction of soft tissues using a radial forearm flap. Due to venous congestion that could only partly be resolved by revision surgery, leech therapy was started on the second postoperative day. The patient developed pneumonia and sepsis and died as a result of septic shock, despite having received targeted broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy since day 5. Aeromonas spp. were cultured from both the patient’s specimens and unused leeches. Biochemical identification and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) yielded inconsistent identification results. Finally, microbiological identification of Aeromonas spp. was performed via 16S rDNA sequencing and use of the basic local alignment search tool (BLAST), and strains from both the patient and the leeches were identified as Aeromonas veronii. Aeromonas spp. strains derived from the patient and leeches and independent laboratory strains were submitted to randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) subtyping. RAPD of A. veronii strains from both sources revealed an identical pattern, strongly suggesting the transmission of A. veronii from the leeches to the patient. Physicians should be aware of the potential for severe lethal infections as a fatal side-effect of leech therapy in critically ill patients, which should be addressed using antibiotic prophylaxis. Full article
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