Antimicrobial Therapy in Oral Diseases

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotic Therapy in Infectious Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4026

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca, 400012 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: periodontal medicine; periodontal regeneration; oral stem cell biology; dental materials; biosafety and tooth-periodontal interactions; animal models for ridge preservation; muco-gingival surgery

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Guest Editor
Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj-Napoca, 400012 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: periodontal regeneration; periodontal surgery; oral stem cell biology; biomaterials; dental materials; tooth-periodontal interactions; dental adhesion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Antibiotics, "Antimicrobial Therapy in Oral Diseases", invites articles focused on the clinical use of antibiotics and antiseptic products as replacements of antibiotherapy in dentistry, as well as in-depth research focused on the antibiotic resistance of oral bacteria, effects of antibiotics and antiseptics on oral cell behavior and oral healing, and new antimicrobial-based products for oral use. In particular, clinical and preclinical studies on the use of antimicrobials in periodontal and peri-implant diseases will be highly welcomed.

Aging associated with increased life expectancy augments the frequency of some oral pathologies of infectious aetiology, and their association with some general diseases modifies host response and therapeutical outcomes, complicating clinical and scientific reasoning.

Experimental and well-designed clinical studies based on the above-mentioned topics, but not limited to them, under the umbrella of multi-disciplinarity are highly encouraged.

We invite you to submit your valuable contributions to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Alexandra Roman
Dr. Andrada Soanca
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral
  • antibiotic
  • antiseptic
  • tooth
  • periodontium
  • dental caries
  • implant
  • healing
  • cell
  • biomaterials
  • periodontitis
  • biocompatibility
  • toxicity
  • periodontology
  • periodontal pocket
  • bacteria
  • nonsurgical treatment
  • oral surgery
  • clinical trial

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1047 KiB  
Article
In Vitro Assessment of Antifungal and Antibiofilm Efficacy of Commercial Mouthwashes against Candida albicans
by Marzena Korbecka-Paczkowska and Tomasz M. Karpiński
Antibiotics 2024, 13(2), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13020117 - 25 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Candida albicans is the most critical fungus causing oral mycosis. Many mouthwashes contain antimicrobial substances, including antifungal agents. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of 15 commercial mouthwashes against 12 strains of C. albicans. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), [...] Read more.
Candida albicans is the most critical fungus causing oral mycosis. Many mouthwashes contain antimicrobial substances, including antifungal agents. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of 15 commercial mouthwashes against 12 strains of C. albicans. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs), and anti-biofilm activity were studied. MICs were determined by the micro-dilution method using 96-well plates, and MFCs were determined by culturing MIC suspensions on Sabouraud dextrose agar. Anti-biofilm activity was evaluated using the crystal violet method. The mouthwashes containing octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT; mean MICs 0.09–0.1%), chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX; MIC 0.12%), and CHX with cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC; MIC 0.13%) exhibited the best activity against C. albicans. The active compound antifungal concentrations were 0.5–0.9 µg/mL for OCT products and 1.1–2.4 µg/mL for CHX rinses. For mouthwashes with CHX + CPC, concentrations were 1.56 µg/mL and 0.65 µg/mL, respectively. Products with polyaminopropyl biguanide (polyhexanide, PHMB; MIC 1.89%) or benzalkonium chloride (BAC; MIC 6.38%) also showed good anti-Candida action. In biofilm reduction studies, mouthwashes with OCT demonstrated the most substantial effect (47–51.1%). Products with CHX (32.1–41.7%), PHMB (38.6%), BAC (35.7%), Scutellaria extract (35.6%), and fluorides + essential oils (33.2%) exhibited moderate antibiofilm activity. The paper also provides an overview of the side effects of CHX, CPC, and OCT. Considering the in vitro activity against Candida albicans, it can be inferred that, clinically, mouthwashes containing OCT are likely to offer the highest effectiveness. Meanwhile, products containing CHX, PHMB, or BAC can be considered as promising alternatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Therapy in Oral Diseases)
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13 pages, 3242 KiB  
Article
Novel Iron Chelators, Super-Polyphenols, Show Antimicrobial Effects against Cariogenic Streptococcus mutans
by Yuki Shinoda-Ito, Kazuhiro Omori, Takashi Ito, Masaaki Nakayama, Atsushi Ikeda, Masahiro Ito, Toshiaki Ohara and Shogo Takashiba
Antibiotics 2023, 12(11), 1562; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12111562 - 24 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1337
Abstract
Dental caries are an oral infectious disease that can affect human health both orally and systemically. It remains an urgent issue to establish a novel antibacterial method to prevent oral infection for a healthy life expectancy. The aim of this study was to [...] Read more.
Dental caries are an oral infectious disease that can affect human health both orally and systemically. It remains an urgent issue to establish a novel antibacterial method to prevent oral infection for a healthy life expectancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effects of novel iron chelators, super-polyphenols (SPs), on the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans, in vitro. SPs were developed to reduce the side effects of iron chelation therapy and were either water-soluble or insoluble depending on their isoforms. We found that SP6 and SP10 inhibited bacterial growth equivalent to povidone-iodine, and viability tests indicated that their effects were bacteriostatic. These results suggest that SP6 and SP10 have the potential to control oral bacterial infections such as Streptococcus mutans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Therapy in Oral Diseases)
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Review

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11 pages, 1221 KiB  
Review
Systemic Impact of Subgingival Infection Control in Periodontitis Patients with Cardiovascular Disease: A Narrative Review
by Carmen Silvia Caloian, Andreea Ciurea, Marius Negucioiu, Alexandra Roman, Iulia Cristina Micu, Andrei Picoș and Andrada Soancă
Antibiotics 2024, 13(4), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13040359 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 881
Abstract
Introduction: Periodontitis, an infectious inflammatory condition, is a key contributor to sustained systemic inflammation, intricately linked to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in developed nations. Treating periodontitis with subgingival mechanical instrumentation with or without adjunctive antimicrobials reduces the microbial [...] Read more.
Introduction: Periodontitis, an infectious inflammatory condition, is a key contributor to sustained systemic inflammation, intricately linked to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death in developed nations. Treating periodontitis with subgingival mechanical instrumentation with or without adjunctive antimicrobials reduces the microbial burden and local inflammation, while also potentially bringing systemic benefits for patients with both periodontitis and CVD. This review examines systemic effects of subgingival instrumentation with or without antimicrobial products in individuals with periodontitis and CVD, and explores intricate pathogenetic interactions between periodontitis and CVD. Material and Methods: English-language databases (PubMed MEDLINE and Cochrane Library) were searched for studies assessing the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapies in periodontitis patients with or without CVD. Results: While the ability of periodontal therapy to reduce mortality- and morbidity-related outcomes in CVD patients with periodontitis remains uncertain, some studies indicate a decrease in inflammatory markers and blood cell counts. Subgingival mechanical instrumentation delivered over multiple short sessions carries lower risks of adverse effects, particularly systemic inflammation, compared to the full-mouth delivery, making it a preferable option for CVD patients. Conclusions: Subgingival mechanical instrumentation, ideally conducted in a quadrant-based therapeutic approach, to decontaminate periodontal pockets has the potential to reduce both local and systemic inflammation with minimal adverse effects in patients suffering from periodontitis and concurrent CVD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antimicrobial Therapy in Oral Diseases)
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