The Influence of Environment and Management on the Animal-Origin Products

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 5633

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Anthropic Impact and Sustainability in Marine Environment (IAS), National Research Council (CNR), Palermo, Italy
Interests: animal product quality; environment and human health; animal welfare; meat, milk, and fish
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Institute of Anthropic Impact and Sustainability in Marine Environment (IAS), National Research Council (CNR), Palermo, Italy
Interests: food contaminants; human health risk assessment; models based on how to evaluate contaminant accumulation (BMF, BAF, BCF) in animals; human exposure and health

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Guest Editor
Department of Molecular and Biomolecular Science and Technology, University of Palermo, Via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo, Italy
Interests: mass spectrometry; chromatography; food chemistry

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Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technologies, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
Interests: spectrometry; analytical method development; method development; analytical chemistry instrumentation; chromatography mass spectrometry high-performance liquid chromatography; sample preparation for liquid chromatography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interest in the interaction between the environment and food quality has increased. Using different pathways, both terrestrial and aquatic systems can expose animals to inorganic and organic pollutants that can be accumulated in food, such as dairy products, meat products, fish, crustaceans and mollusks. Pollutants can also be generated and transferred to these products through different processes (smoking, drying and heating), as well as cooking methods (roasting, baking, frying and grilling), or via release from packaging materials.

Therefore, foodstuff can present complex mixtures of these polluting compounds, causing adverse effects on human health while containing essential and beneficial sources of organoleptic and nutraceutical compounds such as specific fatty acids, glucans, polyphenols, vitamins and other antioxidants.

These last beneficial substances and pollutant compounds are present in the natural environment and could be transferred to food of animal origin.

This Special Issue invites original manuscripts that focus on these aspects, especially considering interdisciplinary studies that pay attention to the risks and benefits to humans related to the consumption of food of animal origin, particularly:

  • The occurrence of environmental contaminants in food of animal origin;
  • Environmental interaction with the occurrence of nutraceutical compounds in food of animal origin;
  • The occurrence of contaminants in food of animal origin due to making processes and cooking methods;
  • Innovative productive processes, techniques and management systems improving the safety of food of animal origin;
  • The assessment of risks and benefits to humans related to the consumption of food of animal origin.

Dr. Cristina Giosuè
Dr. Fabio D'Agostino
Dr. Giuseppe Avellone
Dr. Serena Indelicato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • environment
  • animal-origin food
  • livestock management
  • cooking methods
  • making processes
  • pollutants

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1004 KiB  
Article
A Study on Mineral Oil Hydrocarbons (MOH) Contamination in Pig Diets and Its Transfer to Back Fat and Loin Tissues
by Paula Albendea, Chiara Conchione, Luca Menegoz Ursol and Sabrina Moret
Animals 2024, 14(10), 1450; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14101450 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 512
Abstract
This study assessed saturated mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOSH) and aromatic mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOAH) levels in grower–finisher feeds for pigs supplemented with 5% crude palm oil (CP), crude olive pomace oil (COP), olive pomace acid oil (OPA), or a blend of CP and [...] Read more.
This study assessed saturated mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOSH) and aromatic mineral oil hydrocarbons (MOAH) levels in grower–finisher feeds for pigs supplemented with 5% crude palm oil (CP), crude olive pomace oil (COP), olive pomace acid oil (OPA), or a blend of CP and OPA (50:50, w/w); the contribution of the lipid source to that contamination; and the ability of pigs to accumulate MOH in back fat and loin tissues after 60 days of trial. MOSH and MOAH were analyzed with liquid chromatography (LC)–gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detection (FID) after sample preparation. Among the lipid sources, CP had the lowest MOH levels, but CP feeds showed the highest contamination. This, along with the different MOSH profiles, indicated the presence of more significant contamination sources in the feeds than the lipid source. The higher MOH contamination in CP feeds was reflected in the highest MOSH levels in pig back fat, whereas MOAH were not detected in animal tissues. Also, MOSH bioaccumulation in pig tissues was influenced by the carbon chain length. In conclusion, feed manufacturing processes can determine the MOSH contamination present in animal adipose tissues that can be included in human diets. Full article
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12 pages, 264 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Zinc and Copper Content in Selected Tissues and Organs of Wild Mallard Ducks (Anas platyrhynchos L.) in Poland
by Elżbieta Bombik, Antoni Bombik and Katarzyna Pietrzkiewicz
Animals 2024, 14(8), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14081176 - 14 Apr 2024
Viewed by 626
Abstract
The research material included selected muscles and liver of mallard ducks obtained in two research areas. A total of 28 mallards were obtained for the study—six males and six females from the Siedlce hunting district and eight males and eight females from the [...] Read more.
The research material included selected muscles and liver of mallard ducks obtained in two research areas. A total of 28 mallards were obtained for the study—six males and six females from the Siedlce hunting district and eight males and eight females from the Leszno hunting district. Zinc and copper concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). It was concluded from the study that the Leszno hunting district is more polluted than the Siedlce hunting district. Among the examined tissues of mallard ducks from both hunting districts, the highest content of zinc and copper was found in the liver. In this organ, birds shot in the Leszno hunting district were characterized by a significantly higher content of these elements compared to birds shot in the Siedlce hunting area. The significantly higher average zinc and copper concentrations in the liver of mallards harvested in this hunting district may have been influenced by fertilization of crop fields in this area with fertilizers containing these elements and by extraction of ore containing zinc and copper minerals in the Legnica-Głogów Copper District. This is an important problem with regard to the safety of consumers of game meat. It was shown that the tissues of male mallards were characterized by higher average levels of zinc and copper than those of females, but the differences were statistically significant only in the case of the average copper content in the leg muscles. Full article
16 pages, 315 KiB  
Article
Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality of Karacabey Merino lambs Reared under Triticale and Oat Pastures Compared with Stall-Fed Lambs
by Hulya Hanoglu Oral, Pembe Dilara Kecici, Firat Alaturk, Cemil Tolu, Bulent Ekiz and Ahmet Gokkus
Animals 2023, 13(21), 3322; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13213322 - 25 Oct 2023
Viewed by 891
Abstract
Fifty-eight Karacabey Merino lambs were used to study the effects of feeding system (triticale pasture, oat pasture, or stall-fed), birth type (single or multiple), gender (male or female), and birth year (2016 or 2017) on various carcass and meat quality characteristics. Stall lambs [...] Read more.
Fifty-eight Karacabey Merino lambs were used to study the effects of feeding system (triticale pasture, oat pasture, or stall-fed), birth type (single or multiple), gender (male or female), and birth year (2016 or 2017) on various carcass and meat quality characteristics. Stall lambs had higher conformation (CS) and fatness (FS) scores, and higher meat L* and h* values than the two pasture groups, possibly due to higher fat content, while oat pasture lambs had the most tender meat. Single-born lambs had higher CS, FS, and Longissimus thoracis muscle section area, while females had higher subcutaneous and non-carcass fat deposits than their counterparts. Both single-born lambs and 2016-born lambs had higher meat a* and C* values than their counterparts. In conclusion, a pasture-based feeding system is more suitable for Karacabey Merino lambs than a stall feeding system, if lean meat and/or meat products are preferred. However, it should not be ignored that stall-fed lambs showed a better fattening performance in terms of conformation and fatness, during the same period. Full article
13 pages, 538 KiB  
Article
Dietary Supplementation with Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb) Benth Fruits to Fattening Rabbits
by Jairo Apáez-Barrios, Juan Ocampo-López, Sergio Soto-Simental, Victoria Guadalupe Aguilar-Raymundo and Maricela Ayala-Martínez
Animals 2023, 13(20), 3249; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13203249 - 18 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1186
Abstract
Pithecellobium dulce produces a fruit used in alternative medicine that could be utilized to feed rabbits. The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the P. dulce fruit on productive performance, carcass traits, meat characteristics, and meat product quality as [...] Read more.
Pithecellobium dulce produces a fruit used in alternative medicine that could be utilized to feed rabbits. The objective of this study was to measure the effect of the P. dulce fruit on productive performance, carcass traits, meat characteristics, and meat product quality as well as shelf-life. Seventy-two California × English pot crossbreed rabbits (35 d age) were randomly distributed into two treatments: a control group without P. dulce and another group fed with 5% of P. dulce, and fattening for 28 d. Productive performance parameters, blood biochemistry and hematology, apparent digestibility, carcass traits, meat characteristics, and meat product shelf-life were measured. The results indicate inclusion of 5% P. dulce improves (p < 0.05) dry and organic matter digestibility and feed conversion rate, but some serum blood enzymes were increased (p < 0.05). The a* value, hardness, and pH decreased (p < 0.05) in the group fed with P. dulce. Antioxidant properties in the meatballs were different (p < 0.05), improving shelf-life and acceptance in sensory analysis. In conclusion, the use of 0.5% of P. dulce fruits to feed fattening rabbits can be used to improve the shelf-life of rabbit meat. Full article
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13 pages, 604 KiB  
Article
Effects of Silage Type and Feeding Intensity on Carcass Traits and Meat Quality of Finishing Holstein–Friesian Bulls
by Zenon Nogalski, Monika Modzelewska-Kapituła and Katarzyna Tkacz
Animals 2023, 13(19), 3065; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13193065 - 29 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1125
Abstract
The study aimed at evaluating the influence of silage type (grass silage—GS, and maize silage—MS) and energy level in the feed portion on animals’ performance, carcass value and the quality of Holstein–Friesian bull meat. The animals were reared using intensive (I) feeding, 1.02 [...] Read more.
The study aimed at evaluating the influence of silage type (grass silage—GS, and maize silage—MS) and energy level in the feed portion on animals’ performance, carcass value and the quality of Holstein–Friesian bull meat. The animals were reared using intensive (I) feeding, 1.02 feed units for meat production (UFV)/kg dry matter (DM), and semi-intensive (SI) feeding, 0.94 UFV/kg DM. Thirty-two HF bulls with an average live weight of 530 kg were assigned to four feeding groups. The proportions (g/kg DM) of feed in the diets were as follows: group GS-I, GS 500, concentrate 500; group GS-SI, GS 700, concentrate 300; group MS-I, MS 500, concentrate 500; and group MS-SI, MS 700, concentrate 300. After 4 months of the finishing phase, bulls were slaughtered and samples of the longissimus lumborum muscle were collected. The silage type did not affect performance, carcass value or meat quality. However, in the intensive feeding, a 33% increase (p < 0.01) in daily weight gain and a reduction in the feed conversion ratio compared to semi-intensive feeding were noted. The carcasses of bulls fed intensively received higher scores for conformation and fatness than the carcasses of bulls fed semi-intensively. The meat of I group bulls had a higher intramuscular fat content and received higher juiciness, tenderness, taste and overall acceptability scores. Full article
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13 pages, 998 KiB  
Brief Report
Amino Acid Composition in Different Tissues of Iceland Scallop from the Barents Sea
by Alexander G. Dvoretsky, Ekaterina D. Obluchinskaya, Elena V. Gorshenina and Vladimir G. Dvoretsky
Animals 2024, 14(2), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14020230 - 11 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 686
Abstract
The Iceland scallop from the Barents Sea is a commercially important species with promising aquaculture potential, but information on the biochemical properties of its tissues is limited. Our analysis of the adductor muscle, gonad, and mantle of this bivalve mollusk from coastal waters [...] Read more.
The Iceland scallop from the Barents Sea is a commercially important species with promising aquaculture potential, but information on the biochemical properties of its tissues is limited. Our analysis of the adductor muscle, gonad, and mantle of this bivalve mollusk from coastal waters provided insight into its amino acid composition. Biochemical analysis revealed predominant levels of glycine (11.8, 11.5, and 9.6 mg g−1, respectively) and arginine (11.2, 8.3, and 5.8 mg g−1, respectively). While multivariate comparisons did not reveal significant differences in amino acid composition between the tissues, single comparisons showed significantly higher levels of arginine and leucine in the adductor muscle compared to those of the mantle. The abundant presence of glycine and arginine underscores their importance in maintaining basic physiological processes, consistent with other scallop species. Redundancy analysis identified water depth and scallop gonad index as influential factors shaping the amino acid profile in the adductor muscle. In the case of the mantle, water temperature emerged as the main driver of amino acid content. Our results confirm the richness of essential amino acids in scallop by-products and highlight their potential for human consumption, production of feed ingredients for farmed animals, and nutraceuticals. Full article
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