Nutritional Quality Assessment in Milk and Dairy Products: Second Edition

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1389

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Quality Assessment and Processing of Animal Products, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Bioeconomy, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: milk; organic production; dairy products; quality; bioactive compounds; whey proteins; vitamins; peptides; chromatographic analysis; food safety
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Quality Assessment and Processing of Animal Products, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Bioeconomy, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Interests: milk; local breeds; animal welfare; milk production; nutritional value of milk; technological parameters; cheese; regional food; traditional food

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent years have seen growing awareness among consumers, accompanied by changes in their dietary preferences. Due to the growing incidence of diseases of civilization, interest in functional food is increasing, as is demand for low-processed food products. The latter are generally produced locally on a small scale (often using raw materials obtained from local animal breeds), using traditional processing methods. These products are distinguished by higher nutritional value and better sensory attributes than mass-produced food products. An increasing amount of food produced at small processing facilities, where the primary goal is high nutritional quality and health benefits, is appearing on the market.

Milk and dairy products are among the most important components of the human diet. No other food product is equal to milk in terms of nutritional value, and its composition is considered a physiological standard to which the nutrients supplied by other products and dishes are compared. Dairy products are a source of proteins of high biological quality, lipids, and carbohydrates (mainly lactose). Moreover, milk is a valuable source of bioactive substances with a beneficial effect on the human body, such as specific proteins, peptides, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, phospholipids, fat- and water-soluble vitamins, macro- and microelements, enzymes, and hormones. However, despite its many valuable nutrients and biologically active substances, milk also contains substances that can cause food intolerance, immunological (i.e., allergies) or non-immunological, causing gastrointestinal disorders.

The quality of milk is determined by numerous factors, which may be genetic (breed, species, and individual traits), physiological (health condition, including of the mammary gland, age, and stage of lactation), and environmental (diet, production season, housing conditions, and welfare). It should be remembered, however, that the quality of milk has a direct and crucial effect on the quality of dairy products, mainly cheese. In recent years, the advantages of traditional (including organic) feeding of dairy animals using pasture forage have been rediscovered. Pasture forage has a beneficial effect on the technological parameters and nutritional value of milk and on its content of functional components believed to have a beneficial effect on human health. In intensive systems, various feed additives in the diet of dairy animals have been shown to increase the nutritional value of milk. Another question that has taken on particular importance is animal welfare. With the intensification of milk production, animal welfare declines, and stress responses to various factors appear. Stressful conditions are known to adversely affect lactation and thus milk yield and quality, while also leading to reproductive disorders. This necessitates multifaceted monitoring of the quality of raw milk, which is crucial to the quality of finished dairy products.

Accurate verification of the quality of raw milk and dairy products requires a wide spectrum of analytical methods, including instrumental methods which are increasingly advanced and precise.

We are convinced that the proposed research problem concerning various factors determining the quality of milk and dairy products, as well as methods of assessing them, will expand the current state of knowledge in this field.
This is evidenced by all the publications selected for this Special Issue.

Dr. Aneta Brodziak
Prof. Dr. Joanna Barłowska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • milk
  • various species of animals
  • local breeds
  • animal welfare
  • production system
  • dairy products
  • regional products
  • quality
  • nutritional value
  • technological suitability
  • bioactive compounds
  • methods of analysis

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 526 KiB  
Article
Butter from Different Species: Composition and Quality Parameters of Products Commercialized in the South of Spain
by Montserrat Vioque-Amor, Rafael Gómez-Díaz, Mercedes Del Río-Celestino and Carmen Avilés-Ramírez
Animals 2023, 13(22), 3559; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13223559 - 18 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1163
Abstract
Butter is an important product for the dairy industry due to its particular sensory attributes and nutritional value, while the variability of the composition of the fatty acids in the milk can alter the nutritional and physical properties of butter and its acceptance [...] Read more.
Butter is an important product for the dairy industry due to its particular sensory attributes and nutritional value, while the variability of the composition of the fatty acids in the milk can alter the nutritional and physical properties of butter and its acceptance by consumers. Butter is highly appreciated for its distinctive flavor and aroma; however, one of its main drawbacks lies in the difficulty in spreading it at low temperatures. Several types of butter that are present in the market were used in this study. We assessed the variability in the composition of the samples regarding their texture, color properties, and volatile organic compound profiles. We analyzed samples commercially produced from sheep’s milk (SB), goat’s milk (GB), and cow’s milk (CB); samples from the latter species with (CSB) and without salt (CB); and the low-fat (CLB) version. All the physicochemical composition parameters were significantly affected by the effect of the type of butter, although only 29 out of the 45 fatty acids examined were identified in the butter samples analyzed. The textural properties of the butters were influenced by both their solid fat content and the fatty acid profile. In addition, the origin of the milk not only affected the texture parameters but also the color of the butters and the compounds associated with traits such as odor and flavor. Through the multivariate data analysis of butter fatty acids and volatile compound percentages, we observed a clear differentiation of the samples based on the species of origin. Full article
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