Environmental Pollution: Focus on Human and Animal Health

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 15380

Special Issue Editors

Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Messina, Via Palatucci Annunziata, 98168 Messina, Italy
Interests: circulation serotonin concentration as a pivotal biomarker of animal stress; studies of ecotoxicology and risk from xenobiotics; investigation on the effects of xenobiotics with potential endocrine or carcinogenic activity on fish models; studies on the in vivo and in vitro effects of anti-inflammatory substances; research for contaminants in fresh and processed foods for humans
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Messina, 98155 Messina, Italy
Interests: veterinary pharmacology; toxicology; pharmacological activity of natural substances; nutraceuticals; dietary contaminants; animal welfare
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue welcomes studies on the presence and accumulation of pollutants in the veterinary and human fields in order to give a comprehensible comparison of the presence of toxicants in different conditions. Pharmaceutical products can also display endocrine activity and can be of natural origin (e.g., phytoestrogens present in soy) or artificial. Examples of endocrine disruptors sometimes found in food include synthetic herbicides, environmental pollutants such as PCBs and bisphenol.

The study of toxic substances of different origins for risk assessment, the definition of safeguarding animal welfare and the environment, the influence of toxic substances on livestock production and the possibility of using animals as biological indicators of environmental contamination states such as mineral elements, mycotoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different animal species and in foods of animal origin (milk, cheese, fish, eggs, etc.) are the foci of this Special Issue. In addition, pharmaceutical products, which include antimicrobials such as antibiotics, contraceptive hormones, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, lipid regulators, anti-cancer drugs, anti-epileptic drugs, and regulating blood pressure drugs, represent pollutants in both the human and veterinary fields. Veterinary drugs and those for human use are introduced into the environment when contaminated manure or sewage sludge is spread over the fields. Given the widespread use of drugs in industrial livestock production, their release into the environment is a source of great concern.

Dr. Patrizia Licata
Dr. Enrico Gugliandolo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental pollution
  • toxicological risk
  • one health
  • endocrine disruptors
  • pharmaceutical residues
  • antibiotic resistance

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

11 pages, 612 KiB  
Article
Airborne Dissemination of Bacteria (Enterococci, Staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae) in a Modern Broiler Farm and Its Environment
Animals 2021, 11(6), 1783; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11061783 - 15 Jun 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3919
Abstract
The role of the air as a vehicle of bacteria dissemination in the farming environment has been previously reported, but still scarcely studied. This study investigated the bacteria density/diversity of the inside and outside air and of litter samples at a broiler farm. [...] Read more.
The role of the air as a vehicle of bacteria dissemination in the farming environment has been previously reported, but still scarcely studied. This study investigated the bacteria density/diversity of the inside and outside air and of litter samples at a broiler farm. Samples were collected considering two seasons, three outside air distances (50/100/150 m) and the four cardinal directions. Selective media was used for staphylococci, enterococci, and Enterobacteriaceae recovery. A high number of bacteria was detected in the litter (2.9 × 105–5.8 × 107 cfu/g) and in the inside air (>105 cfu/m3), but a low emission of bacteria was evidenced in the outside air (<6 cfu/m3). Moreover, the bacteria detected in the farm’s outside air decreased the further from the farm the sample was taken. A total of 544 isolates were identified by MALDI-TOF (146 from the litter, 142 from inside air and 256 from outside air). From these, 162 staphylococci (14 species; S. saprophyticus 40.7%), 176 Enterobacteriaceae (4 species; E. coli 66%) and 190 enterococci (4 species; E. hirae 83%) were detected. E. hirae was the predominant species, and identical PFGE clones were detected in inside and outside samples. The detection of identical DNA profiles in E. hirae isolates from inside and outside samples suggests the role of the air in bacterial dissemination from the inside of the broiler farm to the immediate environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Pollution: Focus on Human and Animal Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2538 KiB  
Article
Changes Caused by Low Doses of Bisphenol A (BPA) in the Neuro-Chemistry of Nerves Located in the Porcine Heart
Animals 2021, 11(3), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030780 - 11 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1994
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA) contained in plastics used in the production of various everyday objects may leach from these items and contaminate food, water and air. As an endocrine disruptor, BPA negatively affects many internal organs and systems. Exposure to BPA also contributes to [...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA) contained in plastics used in the production of various everyday objects may leach from these items and contaminate food, water and air. As an endocrine disruptor, BPA negatively affects many internal organs and systems. Exposure to BPA also contributes to heart and cardiovascular system dysfunction, but many aspects connected with this activity remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the impact of BPA in a dose of 0.05 mg/kg body weight/day (in many countries such a dose is regarded as a tolerable daily intake–TDI dose of BPA–completely safe for living organisms) on the neurochemical characterization of nerves located in the heart wall using the immunofluorescence technique. The obtained results indicate that BPA (even in such a relatively low dose) increases the number of nerves immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y, substance P and tyrosine hydroxylase (used here as a marker of sympathetic innervation). However, BPA did not change the number of nerves immunoreactive to vesicular acetylcholine transporter (used here as a marker of cholinergic structures). These observations suggest that changes in the heart innervation may be at the root of BPA-induced circulatory disturbances, as well as arrhythmogenic and/or proinflammatory effects of this endocrine disruptor. Moreover, changes in the neurochemical characterization of nerves in the heart wall may be the first sign of exposure to BPA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Pollution: Focus on Human and Animal Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 1203 KiB  
Article
Bioaccumulation of Mineral Elements in Different Biological Substrates of Athletic Horse from Messina, Italy
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1877; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101877 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1923
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels and the potential bioaccumulation of vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and bismuth (Bi) in horses from the industrial risk area of Sicily (Italy). Different [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels and the potential bioaccumulation of vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and bismuth (Bi) in horses from the industrial risk area of Sicily (Italy). Different biological substrates (whole blood, serum; tail and mane) and samples of hay, concentrate and water provided to the horses were processed by means of Thermo Scientific iCAP-Q ICP–MS spectrometer for mineral concentration. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to show the differences in various trace elements in the biological substrates. Pearson’s test was applied to evaluate the correlation of mineral concentrations between whole blood and serum; and tail and mane. The results showed statistical differences of tested mineral elements among biological substrates; Cr whole blood concentrations were negatively correlated with serum concentrations and a positive correlation between whole blood and serum was observed for Cd and Bi. This latter also showed a positive correlation between mane and tail. The concentrations of V, Cr, and Pb in tail with serum and whole blood samples were negatively correlated, while the concentrations of Cd in tail and serum samples were positively correlated. Minerals had a non-homogenous distribution in the organism, showing different concentrations in the biological substrates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Pollution: Focus on Human and Animal Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

21 pages, 3429 KiB  
Review
Effects of Diesel, Heavy Metals and Plastics Pollution on Penguins in Antarctica: A Review
Animals 2021, 11(9), 2505; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11092505 - 26 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 5510
Abstract
Antarctica is a relatively pristine continent that attracts scientists and tourists alike. However, the risk of environmental pollution in Antarctica is increasing with the increase in the number of visitors. Recently, there has been a surge in interest regarding diesel, heavy metals and [...] Read more.
Antarctica is a relatively pristine continent that attracts scientists and tourists alike. However, the risk of environmental pollution in Antarctica is increasing with the increase in the number of visitors. Recently, there has been a surge in interest regarding diesel, heavy metals and microplastics pollution. Contamination from these pollutants poses risks to the environment and the health of organisms inhabiting the continent. Penguins are one of the most prominent and widely distributed animals in Antarctica and are at major risk due to pollution. Even on a small scale, the impacts of pollution toward penguin populations are extensive. This review discusses the background of penguins in Antarctica, the anthropogenic pollution and cases, as well as the impacts of diesel, heavy metals and microplastics toxicities on penguins. The trends of the literature for the emerging risks of these pollutants are also reviewed through a bibliometric approach and network mapping analysis. A sum of 27 articles are analyzed on the effects of varying pollutants on penguins in Antarctica from 2000 to 2020 using the VOSviewer bibliometric software, Microsoft Excel and Tableau Public. Research articles collected from the Scopus database are evaluated for the most applicable research themes according to the bibliometric indicators (articles, geography distribution, annual production, integrated subject areas, key source journals and keyword or term interactions). Although bibliometric studies on the present research theme are not frequent, our results are sub-optimal due to the small number of search query matches from the Scopus database. As a result, our findings offer only a fragmentary comprehension of the topics in question. Nevertheless, this review provides valuable inputs regarding prospective research avenues for researchers to pursue in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Pollution: Focus on Human and Animal Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1