The Junction between Ruminants' Health Status and Quality of Animal Products

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4873

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Animal Breeding Department, Institute of Animal Sciences, Faculty of Animal Breeding, Bioengineering and Conservation, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Ciszewskiego Str, 8, 02-786 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: animal breeding; cattle; metabolic profile; organic production; bioactive substances; technological parameters; protein polymorphism; modern instrumental methods
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Department of Ruminant Science, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Klemensa Janickiego Str. 29, 71-270 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: cytogenetic; animal reproduction; animal production; fertility
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The quality of ruminant meat and milk is influenced by many factors, such as animal welfare and health, nutrition, as well as environmental factors. Nutrition plays an important role in the performance of animals, and any change in the way of feeding or nutritional deficiencies of animals translate into changes in productivity. Feed additives, including probiotics, aim to achieve benefits such as better animal growth, reduction of mortality, and improvement of product quality. These additives have been shown to improve products' sensory properties. Yeast included in feed additives such as probiotic products and digestive stimulants is a source of bioactive compounds that have an immunostimulating effect and improve the quality of meat. In addition, other additives such as natural bioactive compounds and vitamin E and selenium may have a stress-relieving effect as well as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

Prof. Dr. Beata Kuczyńska
Prof. Dr. Ewa Czerniawska-Piątkowska
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • ruminant
  • health
  • quality
  • product

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 1212 KiB  
Article
The Expression of Selected Cytokine Genes in the Livers of Young Castrated Bucks after Supplementation with a Mixture of Dry Curcuma longa and Rosmarinus officinalis Extracts
by Daria Maria Urbańska, Marek Pawlik, Agnieszka Korwin-Kossakowska, Karolina Rutkowska, Ewelina Kawecka-Grochocka, Michał Czopowicz, Marcin Mickiewicz, Jarosław Kaba and Emilia Bagnicka
Animals 2023, 13(22), 3489; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13223489 - 12 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The study aims to determine the effect of supplementation with a mixture of Curcuma longa and Rosmarinus officinalis extracts (896:19 ratio) on the expression of 15 cytokine genes in the livers of 20 castrated goat bucks. Two equal groups were created: treated and [...] Read more.
The study aims to determine the effect of supplementation with a mixture of Curcuma longa and Rosmarinus officinalis extracts (896:19 ratio) on the expression of 15 cytokine genes in the livers of 20 castrated goat bucks. Two equal groups were created: treated and control groups. The treated group was provided a mixture (1.6 g/day/buck) for 124 days. Liver tissue samples were collected after slaughter. The gene expression was analyzed using RT-qPCR with two reference genes. Variance analysis was conducted using a model with the group fixed effect. IL-2 and IL-8 expression was below the detection level. No differences were found for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-16, IFN-α, IFN-β, TNF-α, and CCL4 expressions, suggesting that supplementation does not activate cytokine production in the healthy hepatocytes. The treated group demonstrated lower IL-12 expression (p < 0.05) and a tendency for higher IL-18 and INF-γ (0.05 < p < 0.10) expressions, which may indicate a hypersensitivity resulting from excessive supplement dose. The increased IFN-γ expression could be caused by the increased IL-18 expression. If a small dose of extract can induce an allergic reaction in young goat bucks, it is also possible that humans may be susceptible to an overdose of curcumin and/or turmeric extracts. Full article
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10 pages, 304 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Milk Protein Polymorphism and Selected Cows’ Reproductive Indices
by Ewa Czerniawska-Piątkowska, Barbara Cioch-Szklarz, Alicja Kowalczyk, Marcjanna Wrzecińska, Jerzy Wójcik, Władysław Kordan, Jose Pedro Araujo, Joaquim L. Cerqueira, Kamil Kossakowski, Przemysław Cwynar and Piotr Sablik
Animals 2023, 13(11), 1729; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13111729 - 23 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1368
Abstract
This research sought to determine the effect of selected milk protein polymorphisms on the reproduction parameters of 598 black and white Polish Holstein–Friesian cattle. The analyzed genes were kappa-casein (CSN3) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG). The following reproductive indexes were selected: [...] Read more.
This research sought to determine the effect of selected milk protein polymorphisms on the reproduction parameters of 598 black and white Polish Holstein–Friesian cattle. The analyzed genes were kappa-casein (CSN3) and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG). The following reproductive indexes were selected: the age at first calving, the interpregnancy period, the calving interval, and the insemination index. The influence of the identified genotypes on the course of parturition in cows was also analyzed. Source data were collected for each cow from the beginning of the herd life and reproduction to its culling from the herd or the end of its third lactation. Data on the age at first calving, the amount of semen portions for artificial insemination (insemination index), the interpregnancy period, and the calving interval for each cow were also collected. A contingency analysis was performed through contingency tables using a Pearson’s chi-squared test for each CSN3 and BLG genotype. The results show that the BB genotype of the kappa-casein gene was associated with the most favorable values of reproductive indicators. In the case of the calving interval, the values were significantly more favorable than those of other genotypes (p ≤ 0.05). No effect of beta-lactoglobulin polymorphism on the analyzed reproductive indices was observed. On the other hand, in the case of the interpregnancy period, significant statistical differences were obtained between the AA and BB genotypes. The analyzed kappa-casein and beta-lactoglobulin genotypes did not significantly influence the course of parturition in cows. To conclude, the genotype polymorphism BB CSN3 is the most favorable for the performance of the cows in the examined herd. Full article

Review

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20 pages, 372 KiB  
Review
Organic Milk Production and Dairy Farming Constraints and Prospects under the Laws of the European Union
by Grzegorz Grodkowski, Marcin Gołębiewski, Jan Slósarz, Kinga Grodkowska, Piotr Kostusiak, Tomasz Sakowski and Kamila Puppel
Animals 2023, 13(9), 1457; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani13091457 - 25 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2053
Abstract
In recent years, there has been rapid development in organic farming. When choosing organic livestock products, consumers are guided by the conviction that animals are provided with the highest welfare standards and access to pasture. The purpose of this article was to trace [...] Read more.
In recent years, there has been rapid development in organic farming. When choosing organic livestock products, consumers are guided by the conviction that animals are provided with the highest welfare standards and access to pasture. The purpose of this article was to trace the principles of organic farming prevailing in the EU with regard to milk production and cattle breeding. The principles of organic production are universal and their application is not limited to certified farms. Organic certification is intended to assure the consumer of the quality and method of production. Due to additional requirements imposed by law, organic cows are usually kept in better welfare conditions compared to conventional cattle, but this is not the rule. The altered taste and texture of organic milk and its products compared to conventional products mainly depends on the presence of pasture greens in the cows’ diet. Therefore, milk from conventionally kept, pasture-grazed cows may have similar characteristics and composition. Organic farms tend to have lower milk yields compared to conventional farms due to the lower consumption of concentrate feed. In the future, it is expected that the proportion of land that is unsuitable for the production of crops for human consumption will increasingly be used for cow grazing. Full article
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