Phenolic Compounds, Terpenoids and N-containing Substances Found in Fruits and Vegetables

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Product Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2024) | Viewed by 1111

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Biotehnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva Ulica 101, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: primary/secondary metabolism; abiotic stress; enzymes; isotopes; physiology

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Guest Editor
Department of Agronomy, Biotehnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva Ulica 101, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: vegetables; abiotic/biotic stress; metabolism; phenolics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

Fruit and vegetables are a rich source of metabolites such as sugars, organic acids, vitamins, phenolic compounds, terpenoids and N-containing substances. As the consumption of fruits and vegetables is increasing and the demand for high-quality fruits and vegetables is rising, extensive studies in the field of plant metabolomics are needed. Phenolic compounds, terpenoids and N-containing substances are three main groups, all of which are extremely important for human health and still represent a wide field for study.

This Special Issue focuses on detailed studies on the metabolomics of fruits and vegetables, especially phenolic compounds, terpenoids and N-containing substances. New methods of determination and quantification are welcome. Studies on substances in low concentrations are also welcome. Studies investigating the effects of post-harvest and abiotic/biotic stress on fruit and vegetable metabolites are strongly encouraged. All types of articles, such as original papers, statements and reviews, will be considered for publication in this Special Issue.

Dr. Tilen Zamljen
Dr. Ana Slatnar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • phenolics
  • terpenoids
  • postharvest
  • HPLC
  • metabolomics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3282 KiB  
Article
Determination of Volatile Compounds in Blossoms of Rosa spinosissima, Rosa pendulina, Rosa gallica, and Their Cultivars
by Nina Kunc, Metka Hudina, Gregor Osterc and Mariana Cecilia Grohar
Agriculture 2024, 14(2), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14020253 - 4 Feb 2024
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Abstract
The aim of our study was to determine how the content and composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) change with crossbreeding. We included three autochthonous Slovenian species of roses (R. pendulina, R. spinosissima, and R. gallica) and several cultivars derived [...] Read more.
The aim of our study was to determine how the content and composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) change with crossbreeding. We included three autochthonous Slovenian species of roses (R. pendulina, R. spinosissima, and R. gallica) and several cultivars derived from them in the research. The results were compared with the content of the reference plant R. damascena, which is known worldwide for its rich VOC profile and is used in the perfume industry. We found that the total VOC content ranged from 2.579 µg/g FW (‘Fruhlingsmorgen’) to 168.24 µg/g FW (‘Violacea’). According to the content of total VOCs, the variety ‘Charles de Mills’ (43.12 µg/g DM) was the most similar to the variety R. damascena (44.55 µg/g DM). We can conclude that the flowers of the roses we included in the study are a rich source of VOCs. VOC content in hybrids varies depending on the purpose and goals of breeders. We also found that flowering time had no effect on VOC content and composition. With this study, we not only carefully examined the VOC profile of roses but also clearly showed which compounds were present in individual taxa. In this way, it is possible to select a suitable variety or cultivar depending on the desired use, for example, for flavoring food or for a floral fragrance in the perfume industry. Full article
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