Previous Issue
Volume 5, March
 
 

NeuroSci, Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2024) – 6 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
15 pages, 7708 KiB  
Article
Influence of Temporal and Frequency Selective Patterns Combined with CSP Layers on Performance in Exoskeleton-Assisted Motor Imagery Tasks
by Cristian David Guerrero-Mendez, Cristian Felipe Blanco-Diaz, Hamilton Rivera-Flor, Pedro Henrique Fabriz-Ulhoa, Eduardo Antonio Fragoso-Dias, Rafhael Milanezi de Andrade, Denis Delisle-Rodriguez and Teodiano Freire Bastos-Filho
NeuroSci 2024, 5(2), 169-183; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci5020012 - 11 May 2024
Viewed by 342
Abstract
Common Spatial Pattern (CSP) has been recognized as a standard and powerful method for the identification of Electroencephalography (EEG)-based Motor Imagery (MI) tasks when implementing brain–computer interface (BCI) systems towards the motor rehabilitation of lost movements. The combination of BCI systems with robotic [...] Read more.
Common Spatial Pattern (CSP) has been recognized as a standard and powerful method for the identification of Electroencephalography (EEG)-based Motor Imagery (MI) tasks when implementing brain–computer interface (BCI) systems towards the motor rehabilitation of lost movements. The combination of BCI systems with robotic systems, such as upper limb exoskeletons, has proven to be a reliable tool for neuromotor rehabilitation. Therefore, in this study, the effects of temporal and frequency segmentation combined with layer increase for spatial filtering were evaluated, using three variations of the CSP method for the identification of passive movement vs. MI+passive movement. The passive movements were generated using a left upper-limb exoskeleton to assist flexion/extension tasks at two speeds (high—85 rpm and low—30 rpm). Ten healthy subjects were evaluated in two recording sessions using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) as a classifier, and accuracy (ACC) and False Positive Rate (FPR) as metrics. The results allow concluding that the use of temporal, frequency or spatial selective information does not significantly (p< 0.05) improve task identification performance. Furthermore, dynamic temporal segmentation strategies may perform better than static segmentation tasks. The findings of this study are a starting point for the exploration of complex MI tasks and their application to neurorehabilitation, as well as the study of brain effects during exoskeleton-assisted MI tasks. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 523 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Myofascial Stretching on Mechanical Nociception and Contributing Neural Mechanisms
by Abigail W. Anderson, Arthur Soncini, Kaitlyn Lyons and William J. Hanney
NeuroSci 2024, 5(2), 158-168; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci5020011 - 11 May 2024
Viewed by 294
Abstract
Myofascial stretching is often prescribed in the management of musculoskeletal pain. However, the neural mechanisms contributing to a decrease in pain are unknown. Stretching produces a sensation that may act as a conditioning stimulus in a conditioned pain modulation response. The purpose of [...] Read more.
Myofascial stretching is often prescribed in the management of musculoskeletal pain. However, the neural mechanisms contributing to a decrease in pain are unknown. Stretching produces a sensation that may act as a conditioning stimulus in a conditioned pain modulation response. The purpose of this study was to compare immediate changes in pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) during a low-intensity stretch, moderate-intensity stretch, and cold water immersion task. A secondary purpose was to examine if personal pain sensitivity and psychological characteristics were associated with the responses to these interventions. Twenty-seven (27) healthy participants underwent a cross-over study design in which they completed a cold water immersion task, upper trapezius stretch to the onset of the stretch sensation, and a moderate-intensity stretch. A significant condition x time effect was observed (F (8,160) = 2.85, p < 0.01, partial eta2 = 0.13), indicating reductions in pain sensitivity were significantly greater during a cold water immersion task compared to moderate-intensity stretching at minutes two and four. Widespread increases in heat pain threshold and lower pain-related anxiety were moderately correlated with the response to the cold water immersion task but not stretching. Moderate-intensity stretching may not elicit a conditioned pain modulation response possibly because the stretch was not intense enough to be perceived as painful. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2376 KiB  
Article
Cytotoxic Effect of Amyloid-β1-42 Oligomers on Endoplasmic Reticulum and Golgi Apparatus Arrangement in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells
by José J. Jarero-Basulto, Yadira Gasca-Martínez, Martha C. Rivera-Cervantes, Deisy Gasca-Martínez, Nidia Jannette Carrillo-González, Carlos Beas-Zárate and Graciela Gudiño-Cabrera
NeuroSci 2024, 5(2), 141-157; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci5020010 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 697
Abstract
Amyloid-β oligomers are a cytotoxic structure that is key for the establishment of the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These structures promote subcellular alterations that cause synaptic dysfunction, loss of cell communication, and even cell death, generating cognitive deficits. The aim of [...] Read more.
Amyloid-β oligomers are a cytotoxic structure that is key for the establishment of the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These structures promote subcellular alterations that cause synaptic dysfunction, loss of cell communication, and even cell death, generating cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects of amyloid-β1-42 oligomers (AβOs) on the membranous organelles involved in protein processing: the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus (GA). The results obtained with 10 μM AβOs in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells showed that oligomeric structures are more toxic than monomers because they cause cell viability to decrease as exposure time increases. Survivor cells were analyzed to further understand the toxic effects of AβOs on intracellular organelles. Survivor cells showed morphological alterations associated with abnormal cytoskeleton modification 72–96 h after exposure to AβOs. Moreover, the ER and GA presented rearrangement throughout the cytoplasmic space, which could be attributed to a lack of constitutive protein processing or to previous abnormal cytoskeleton modification. Interestingly, the disorganization of both ER and GA organelles exposed to AβOs is likely an early pathological alteration that could be related to aberrant protein processing and accumulation in AD. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1984 KiB  
Article
Effect of Enriched Environment on Cerebellum and Social Behavior of Valproic Zebrafish
by Bernardo Flores-Prieto, Flower Caycho-Salazar, Jorge Manzo, María Elena Hernández-Aguilar, Alfonso Genaro Coria-Avila, Deissy Herrera-Covarrubias, Fausto Rojas-Dúran, Gonzalo Emiliano Aranda-Abreu, Cesar Antonio Pérez-Estudillo and María Rebeca Toledo-Cárdenas
NeuroSci 2024, 5(2), 128-140; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci5020009 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 885
Abstract
The etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been linked to both genetic and epigenetic factors. Among the epigenetic factors, exposure to valproic acid (VPA), an antiepileptic and mood-modulating drug, has been shown to induce characteristic traits of ASD when exposed to during [...] Read more.
The etiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been linked to both genetic and epigenetic factors. Among the epigenetic factors, exposure to valproic acid (VPA), an antiepileptic and mood-modulating drug, has been shown to induce characteristic traits of ASD when exposed to during embryogenesis. Conversely, in animal models, enriched environment (EE) has demonstrated positive behavioral and neural effects, suggesting its potential as a complementary treatment to pharmacological approaches in central nervous system disorders. In this study, we utilized zebrafish to model ASD characteristics induced by VPA and hypothesized that sensory stimulation through EE could ameliorate the behavioral and neuroanatomical features associated with ASD. To test this hypothesis, we assessed social behavior, cerebellar volume, and Purkinje cell populations via histology and immunohistochemistry after exposing the fish to EE. The results revealed that zebrafish exposed to VPA exhibited social deficits, reduced cerebellar cortex volume, and a decrease in c-Fos-positive cells in the Purkinje layer. In contrast, VPA-exposed fish treated with EE showed increased socialization, augmented cerebellar cortex volume, and an elevation in c-Fos-positive Purkinje cells. These findings suggest that alterations induced by VPA may be ameliorated through EE treatment, highlighting the potential therapeutic impact of sensory stimulation in conditions related to ASD. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 778 KiB  
Article
Comparing Self-Report vs. Performance Measures of Attentional Control and Efficiency
by Mohammad Ahsan Khodami, Luca Battaglini, Maryam Jansarvatan, Sofia Kireeva and Seiran Bagheri
NeuroSci 2024, 5(2), 114-127; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci5020008 - 4 Apr 2024
Viewed by 821
Abstract
Background: The Attention Control Scale (ATTC) is a widely used self-report measure of attentional control capacities. However, research questions whether it accurately substitutes for objective attention control tasks. This study investigated ATTC’s correlation with the Attention Network Test (ANT) across alerting, orienting, and [...] Read more.
Background: The Attention Control Scale (ATTC) is a widely used self-report measure of attentional control capacities. However, research questions whether it accurately substitutes for objective attention control tasks. This study investigated ATTC’s correlation with the Attention Network Test (ANT) across alerting, orienting, and executive control networks. We also used the Inverse Efficiency Score (IES) as an additional factor to check ATTC using ANT. Methods: We administered 143 participants who completed the ATTC questionnaire and ANT behavioral test assessing network efficiencies. Results: The results showed non-significant ATTC-ANT correlations across all networks. In an additional analysis, while the ATTC demonstrated factorial validity, subjective control was disconnected from actual attention regulation efficiency. A small male advantage emerged for executive control. Conclusions: Dissociations likely stem from attention complexity and method variances rather than overlap. The findings do not support the ATTC as a stand-alone proxy for performance-based measurement. Multifaceted assessments are essential for comprehensively capturing attentional control. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 808 KiB  
Article
“I Wouldn’t Even Know What to Ask for”: Patients’ and Caregivers’ Experiences of Psychological Support for Huntington’s Disease in Italy
by Nicolò Zarotti, Barbara D’Alessio, Marta Scocchia, Melissa Casella and Ferdinando Squitieri
NeuroSci 2024, 5(2), 98-113; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci5020007 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 535
Abstract
People with Huntington’s disease (HD) often experience psychological difficulties linked with disease progression and the adjustment to living with a chronic condition, which are also frequently shared by their informal caregivers (e.g., partners). Although limited, the current literature on psychological care for people [...] Read more.
People with Huntington’s disease (HD) often experience psychological difficulties linked with disease progression and the adjustment to living with a chronic condition, which are also frequently shared by their informal caregivers (e.g., partners). Although limited, the current literature on psychological care for people with HD shows that interventions have the potential to drive improvements in mental health and quality of life. However, the experience of accessing and receiving psychological support for HD remains unclear across several countries. This study adopted a qualitative design to explore the experiences of psychological support for HD from the perspectives of patients and caregivers living in Italy. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 14 participants—7 patients with early-manifest HD and 7 partners acting as their caregivers. The resulting data were analysed through thematic analysis. Four overarching themes were identified: (1) the availability of psychological support for HD, (2) barriers to accessing psychological support, (3) enablers to accessing psychological support, and (4) the future development of public psychological provision for HD. In Italy, patients and caregivers perceive public psychological support for HD as unavailable or inadequate, and private therapy is often seen as unaffordable. Barriers such as distrust in public healthcare and preconceptions about therapy may limit access, while advice from HD organisations and seeking therapy for other reasons may act as enablers. A strong emphasis is put on the need for accessible public psychological support throughout all the stages of the condition. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Back to TopTop