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Pediatric Reports is published by MDPI from Volume 12 Issue 3 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.

Pediatr. Rep., Volume 6, Issue 1 (February 2014) – 5 articles

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670 KiB  
Article
A Gap between Need and Reality: Neonatal Nursing Staff Requirements on a German Iintensive Care Unit
Pediatr. Rep. 2014, 6(1), 5186; https://doi.org/10.4081/pr.2014.5186 - 28 Mar 2014
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 277
Abstract
Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU) were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high [...] Read more.
Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU) were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care) of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive days once a day in a combined pediatric and neonatal ICU of a metropolitan academic medical center in south-west Germany. Each day, 18.9±0.98 patients (mean±standard deviation) were assessed (14.26±1.21 neonatal, 4.65±0.98 pediatric). Among neonates, 9.94±2.56 received intensive therapy, 3.77±1.85 intensive surveillance, and 0.65±0.71 special care. Average nursing staff requirement was 12.10±1.81 full time equivalents (FTE) per shift. Considering additional pediatric patients in the ICU and actual nursing staff availability (8.97±0.87 FTE per shift), this ICU seems understaffed. Full article
590 KiB  
Case Report
Early Complete Remission of Osteoid Osteoma with Conservative Medical Management
Pediatr. Rep. 2014, 6(1), 5311; https://doi.org/10.4081/pr.2014.5311 - 04 Mar 2014
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 346
Abstract
Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor and causes persistent pain that is usually treated by surgery or ablation therapy. Conservative management with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is also used to avoid the morbidity associated with surgery or ablation therapy; however, it usually [...] Read more.
Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor and causes persistent pain that is usually treated by surgery or ablation therapy. Conservative management with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is also used to avoid the morbidity associated with surgery or ablation therapy; however, it usually takes several years for the condition to resolve using conservative treatment. Our patient, a 10-year-old boy, presented with a 3-month history of a painful lesion in his leg. Plain radiography, bone scanning, computed tomography and magnetic resonance images showed the presence of a lesion with radiological features consistent with an osteoid osteoma of the cortex in the tibial diaphysis. The patient was treated with a usual dose of ibuprofen for 3 weeks. Within 3 weeks, his symptoms were almost completely resolved; he no longer needed NSAIDs and returned to normal life. Repeat imaging studies showed complete disappearance of the nidus within 2.5 years after the resolution of symptoms. Full article
587 KiB  
Article
Health and Development of Children Born after Assisted Reproductive Technology and Sub-Fertility Compared to Naturally Conceived Children: Data from a National Study
Pediatr. Rep. 2014, 6(1), 5118; https://doi.org/10.4081/pr.2014.5118 - 28 Feb 2014
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 332
Abstract
In a non-matched case-control study using data from two large national cohort studies, we investigated whether indicators of child health and development up to 7 years of age differ between children conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART), children born after sub-fertility (more than [...] Read more.
In a non-matched case-control study using data from two large national cohort studies, we investigated whether indicators of child health and development up to 7 years of age differ between children conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART), children born after sub-fertility (more than 24 months of trying for conception) and other children. Information on ART use/sub-fertility was available for 23,649 children. There were 227 cases (children conceived through ART) and two control groups: 783 children born to sub-fertile couples, and 22,639 children born to couples with no fertility issues. In models adjusted for social and demographic factors there were significant differences between groups in rate of hospital admissions before the children were 9 months old (P=0.029), with the ART group showing higher rates of hospital admission than the no fertility issues control group, the sub-fertile control group being intermediate between the two. Children born after ART had comparable health and development beyond 9 months of age to their naturally conceived peers. This applied to the whole sample and to a sub-sample of children from deprived neighborhoods. Full article
615 KiB  
Case Report
Decreasing Adhesions and Avoiding Further Surgery in a Pediatric Patient Involved in a Severe Pedestrian versus Motor Vehicle Accident
Pediatr. Rep. 2014, 6(1), 5126; https://doi.org/10.4081/pr.2014.5126 - 24 Feb 2014
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 344
Abstract
In this case study, we report the use of manual physical therapy in a pediatric patient experiencing complications from a life-threatening motor vehicle accident that necessitated 19 surgeries over the course of 12 months. Post-surgical adhesions decreased the patient’s quality of life. He [...] Read more.
In this case study, we report the use of manual physical therapy in a pediatric patient experiencing complications from a life-threatening motor vehicle accident that necessitated 19 surgeries over the course of 12 months. Post-surgical adhesions decreased the patient’s quality of life. He developed multiple medical conditions including recurrent partial bowel obstructions and an ascending testicle. In an effort to avoid further surgery for bowel obstruction and the ascending testicle, the patient was effectively treated with a manual physical therapy regimen focused on decreasing adhesions. The therapy allowed return to an improved quality of life, significant decrease in subjective reports of pain and dysfunction, and apparent decreases in adhesive processes without further surgery, which are important goals for all patients, but especially for pediatric patients. Full article
642 KiB  
Article
Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Focal Intestinal Perforation in Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the State of Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Pediatr. Rep. 2014, 6(1), 5194; https://doi.org/10.4081/pr.2014.5194 - 17 Feb 2014
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 436
Abstract
In preterm infants with very low birth weight (VLBW) <1500 g the most important acquired intestinal diseases are necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and focal intestinal perforation (FIP). We analyzed data of the neonatology module of national external comparative quality assurance for inpatients in the [...] Read more.
In preterm infants with very low birth weight (VLBW) <1500 g the most important acquired intestinal diseases are necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) and focal intestinal perforation (FIP). We analyzed data of the neonatology module of national external comparative quality assurance for inpatients in the state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Between 2010 and 2012, 59 of 3549 VLBW infants developed FIP (1.7%), 128 of them NEC (3.6%). In approximately 3% of infants with BW<1000 g FIP was diagnosed, which was nearly 9 times more often than in infants with BW between 1250 and 1499 g (FIP frequency 0.36%). NEC frequency increased with decreasing BW and was more than 10 times higher in the smallest infants (BW<750 g: 7.87%) compared to those with BW between 1250 and 1499 g (0.72%). The BW limit of 1250 g differentiates between groups of patients with distinguished risks for NEC and FIP. Full article
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