Topic Editors

Associate Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Surgical Science Department, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy
Dr. Aris Sterodimas
Athens General Hospital, Athens, Greece

Regenerative Surgery: Clinical, In vitro and Instrumental Analysis

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 September 2022)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 December 2022)
Viewed by
17646

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Regenerating damaged tissues, an act that once was considered magic, is currently entrusted to the surgeons who have allowed us to move from replacement and reconstructive plastic surgery to regenerative plastic surgery, through autologous and allogeneic cell-based therapies and growth factors. The enthusiasm for regenerative plastic surgery and for the treatment of some pathologies addressed by it, such as the outcomes of breast cancer, hemifacial atrophy, burns, scars, and aesthetic improvements such as breast and buttock augmentation, face rejuvenation, and hair regrowth, has led the editors of this regenerative surgery topic to investigate the possible new minimally invasive strategies based on adipose-derived stem cells, human follicle stem cells, and growth factors contained in platelet-rich plasma, across all the regenerative fields. The present regenerative surgery topic aims to report on the latest knowledge in the regenerative field, including the treatment of soft-, bone-, and cartilage-tissue defects, hair loss, and wound healing. Therefore, the goal of this topic is to introduce and definitively establish this new and interesting field of plastic surgery, called regenerative plastic surgery.

Dr. Pietro Gentile
Dr. Aris Sterodimas
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • regenerative plastic surgery
  • adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells
  • fat grafting
  • platelet-rich plasma
  • growth factors
  • mesenchymal stem cells
  • biomaterials
  • hair loss
  • androgenetic alopecia
  • soft/bone/cartilage tissues defects
  • regenerative surgery

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Biomedicines
biomedicines
4.7 3.7 2013 15.4 Days CHF 2600
International Journal of Molecular Sciences
ijms
5.6 7.8 2000 16.3 Days CHF 2900
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600
Surgeries
surgeries
- - 2020 24.9 Days CHF 1200

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Published Papers (5 papers)

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15 pages, 7722 KiB  
Article
Effective or Harmful—Evaluation of Locally Applied Antibiotics on Adipose Tissue during Lipofilling to the Breast—An In Vitro Study
by Yannick F. Diehm, Emre Gazyakan, Yiping Wang, Laura C. Siegwart, Valentin Haug, Dimitra Kotsougiani-Fischer, Ulrich Kneser and Sebastian Fischer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 2323; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24032323 - 24 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1350
Abstract
Lipofilling is a frequently used and safe procedure for breast reconstruction. One of the most feared complications is soft tissue infection following lipofilling. Because of this, some surgeons propose the practice of rinsing fat grafts with antibiotics. This study investigates the effect of [...] Read more.
Lipofilling is a frequently used and safe procedure for breast reconstruction. One of the most feared complications is soft tissue infection following lipofilling. Because of this, some surgeons propose the practice of rinsing fat grafts with antibiotics. This study investigates the effect of antibiotic rinses on fat grafts in an in vitro model. Adipocytes and stem cells were isolated from fat tissue harvested during 24 lipofilling procedures and incubated with different doses of clindamycin or cefazolin. Cell viability, metabolism, proliferation, and differentiation capacities were analyzed by gross morphology, fluorescence staining, -(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromid (MTT-), and Glyceraldehyde 3 Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G3PD)-assay as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS)-assay. Cefazolin and clindamycin led to significant reduction of cell viability of adipocytes. High doses of both antibiotics led to a rupture of adipocytes with visible free lipid droplets. Cell metabolism was significantly decreased after incubation with both antibiotics. There was a significant increase in ROS production. Exposure to clindamycin and cefazolin led to morphological changes in stem cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, differentiation potential was significantly reduced. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, however, showed that low concentrations of antibiotics effectively inhibited bacterial growth in contaminated fat grafts. This study confirms that rinsing fat grafts with clindamycin or cefazolin not only overly prevents infection but also has cytotoxic and metabolic effects on adipocytes. Therefore, based on these results, the routine clinical application in high doses cannot be recommended. Full article
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23 pages, 2072 KiB  
Review
Effects of Electrical Stimulation on Articular Cartilage Regeneration with a Focus on Piezoelectric Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Tissue Repair and Engineering
by Zhengjie Zhou, Jingtong Zheng, Xiaoting Meng and Fang Wang
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 1836; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24031836 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5302
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that chondrocytes within articular cartilage are affected by endogenous force-related electrical potentials. Furthermore, electrical stimulation (ES) promotes the proliferation of chondrocytes and the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, which accelerate the healing of cartilage defects. These findings suggest [...] Read more.
There is increasing evidence that chondrocytes within articular cartilage are affected by endogenous force-related electrical potentials. Furthermore, electrical stimulation (ES) promotes the proliferation of chondrocytes and the synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, which accelerate the healing of cartilage defects. These findings suggest the potential application of ES in cartilage repair. In this review, we summarize the pathogenesis of articular cartilage injuries and the current clinical strategies for the treatment of articular cartilage injuries. We then focus on the application of ES in the repair of articular cartilage in vivo. The ES-induced chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and its potential regulatory mechanism are discussed in detail. In addition, we discuss the potential of applying piezoelectric materials in the process of constructing engineering articular cartilage, highlighting the important advances in the unique field of tissue engineering. Full article
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27 pages, 4264 KiB  
Article
Therapeutic Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Bladder Overactivity in the Pathogenesis of Ketamine-Induced Ulcerative Cystitis in a Rat Model
by Kuang-Shun Chueh, Kuan-Hua Huang, Jian-He Lu, Tai-Jui Juan, Shu-Mien Chuang, Rong-Jyh Lin, Yi-Chen Lee, Cheng-Yu Long, Mei-Chen Shen, Ting-Wei Sun and Yung-Shun Juan
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(10), 5771; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23105771 - 21 May 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2716
Abstract
The present study attempted to elucidate whether intravesical instillation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could decrease bladder inflammation and ameliorate bladder hyperactivity in ketamine ulcerative cystitis (KIC) rat model. Female Sprague Dawley (S-D) rats were randomly divided into control group, ketamine-treated group, ketamine with [...] Read more.
The present study attempted to elucidate whether intravesical instillation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could decrease bladder inflammation and ameliorate bladder hyperactivity in ketamine ulcerative cystitis (KIC) rat model. Female Sprague Dawley (S-D) rats were randomly divided into control group, ketamine-treated group, ketamine with PRP treated group, and ketamine with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) treated group. Cystometry and micturition frequency/volume studies were performed to investigate bladder function. The morphological change of bladder was investigated by Mason’s trichrome staining. Western blotting analysis were carried out to examine the protein expressions of inflammation, urothelial differentiation, proliferation, urothelial barrier function, angiogenesis and neurogenesis related proteins. The results revealed that treatment with ketamine significantly deteriorated bladder capacity, decreased voiding function and enhanced bladder overactivity. These pathological damage and interstitial fibrosis may via NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathways and muscarinic receptor overexpression. PRP treatment decreased inflammatory fibrotic biosynthesis, attenuated oxidative stress, promoted urothelial cell regeneration, and enhanced angiogenesis and neurogenesis, thereafter recovered bladder dysfunction and ameliorate the bladder hyperactivity in KIC rat model. These findings suggested that the PRP therapy may offer new treatment options for those clinical KIC patients. Full article
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17 pages, 60626 KiB  
Article
The Induced Membrane Technique—The Filling Matters: Evaluation of Different Forms of Membrane Filling with and without Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells (BMC) in Large Femoral Bone Defects in Rats
by René D. Verboket, Nicolas Söhling, Myriam Heilani, Charlotte Fremdling, Alexander Schaible, Katrin Schröder, Jan C. Brune, Ingo Marzi and Dirk Henrich
Biomedicines 2022, 10(3), 642; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10030642 - 10 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2137
Abstract
The Masquelet technique is used to treat large bone defects; it is a two-stage procedure based on an induced membrane. To improve the induced membrane process, demineralized bone matrix in granular (GDBM) and fibrous form (f-DBM) was tested with and without bone marrow [...] Read more.
The Masquelet technique is used to treat large bone defects; it is a two-stage procedure based on an induced membrane. To improve the induced membrane process, demineralized bone matrix in granular (GDBM) and fibrous form (f-DBM) was tested with and without bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMC) as filling of the membrane against the gold standard filling with syngeneic cancellous bone (SCB). A total of 65 male Sprague–Dawley rats obtained a 5 mm femoral defect. These defects were treated with the induced membrane technique and filled with SCB, GDBM, or f-DBM, with or without BMC. After a healing period of eight weeks, the femurs were harvested and submitted for histological, radiological, and biomechanical analyses. The fracture load in the defect zone was lower compared to SCB in all groups. However, histological analysis showed comparable new bone formation, bone mineral density, and cartilage proportions and vascularization. The results suggest that f-DBM in combination with BMC and the induced membrane technique cannot reproduce the very good results of this material in large, non-membrane coated bone defects, nevertheless it supports the maturation of new bone tissue locally. It can be concluded that BMC should be applied in lower doses and inflammatory cells should be removed from the cell preparation before implantation. Full article
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23 pages, 69956 KiB  
Review
Graphene-Based Materials Prove to Be a Promising Candidate for Nerve Regeneration Following Peripheral Nerve Injury
by Mina Aleemardani, Pariya Zare, Amelia Seifalian, Zohreh Bagher and Alexander M. Seifalian
Biomedicines 2022, 10(1), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10010073 - 30 Dec 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4441
Abstract
Peripheral nerve injury is a common medical condition that has a great impact on patient quality of life. Currently, surgical management is considered to be a gold standard first-line treatment; however, is often not successful and requires further surgical procedures. Commercially available FDA- [...] Read more.
Peripheral nerve injury is a common medical condition that has a great impact on patient quality of life. Currently, surgical management is considered to be a gold standard first-line treatment; however, is often not successful and requires further surgical procedures. Commercially available FDA- and CE-approved decellularized nerve conduits offer considerable benefits to patients suffering from a completely transected nerve but they fail to support neural regeneration in gaps > 30 mm. To address this unmet clinical need, current research is focused on biomaterial-based therapies to regenerate dysfunctional neural tissues, specifically damaged peripheral nerve, and spinal cord. Recently, attention has been paid to the capability of graphene-based materials (GBMs) to develop bifunctional scaffolds for promoting nerve regeneration, often via supporting enhanced neural differentiation. The unique features of GBMs have been applied to fabricate an electroactive conductive surface in order to direct stem cells and improve neural proliferation and differentiation. The use of GBMs for nerve tissue engineering (NTE) is considered an emerging technology bringing hope to peripheral nerve injury repair, with some products already in preclinical stages. This review assesses the last six years of research in the field of GBMs application in NTE, focusing on the fabrication and effects of GBMs for neurogenesis in various scaffold forms, including electrospun fibres, films, hydrogels, foams, 3D printing, and bioprinting. Full article
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