Topic Editors

Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, The University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Pharmacy, Kansas City, MO, USA
Dr. Dhananjay Nayakankuppam
Department of Marketing, Tippie College of Business, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
15919

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding health behaviors is fundamental to the design, promotion, implementation, or evaluation of health interventions. Theories of health behavior not only provide perspectives to look at behaviors, but also guide various aspects of research methods. This Topic of five participating journals aims to advance the knowledge and application of health behavior theories through the practice of diverse health professions or disciplines. The health care settings can be diverse as well, such as health systems, ambulatory care, long-term care, and so on. The intended audience of this Topic is researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers at regional, national, and international levels.

This Topic mainly focuses on theory-based research to examine health behaviors, and health outcomes research that can provide insights for health behavior theories. Relevant research topics include but are not limited to: testing new or modified theories, identifying predictors of health behaviors, developing measurements, translating theories to practice, examining health outcomes and then informing theory development, promoting health interventions, and evaluating health care services. In addition, this Topic welcomes systematic reviews of the practical application of health behavior theories in the current literature, as well as opinions from established researchers and practitioners.

Dr. Yifei Liu
Dr. Dhananjay Nayakankuppam
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • health behaviors
  • behavioral theories
  • health outcomes
  • health interventions
  • health care services
  • attitude theory
  • judgment and decision making
  • social cognition

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Pharmacy
pharmacy
2.2 - 2013 24.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Clinics and Practice
clinpract
2.3 2.0 2011 26.4 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Nursing Reports
nursrep
2.4 1.6 2011 30.6 Days CHF 1800 Submit
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education
ejihpe
3.2 3.5 2011 20.1 Days CHF 1400 Submit

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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12 pages, 456 KiB  
Article
Establishing the Approach of Norm Balance toward Intention Prediction across Six Behaviors under the Theory of Planned Behavior
Pharmacy 2023, 11(2), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy11020067 - 31 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1414
Abstract
Background: An innovative approach of Norm Balance is proposed under the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). In this approach, the measurement score of subjective norm is weighted by the relative importance of others, and the measurement score of self-identity is weighted by [...] Read more.
Background: An innovative approach of Norm Balance is proposed under the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). In this approach, the measurement score of subjective norm is weighted by the relative importance of others, and the measurement score of self-identity is weighted by the relative importance of self. The study objective was to examine the effect of Norm Balance to predict behavioral intentions in two groups of college students. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were used in two studies. For 153 business undergraduates, Study 1 examined three common intentions: eating a low-fat diet, exercising regularly, and dressing business-like. For 176 PharmD students, Study 2 examined three pharmacy-related intentions: informing relatives about counterfeit medications, buying prescription medications online, and completing a pharmacy residency. The relative importance of others vs. self was measured by asking study subjects to allocate 10 points between important others and oneself. Two sets of regressions were conducted and compared across six intentions using the traditional model and the Norm Balance model. Results: The 12 regressions explained 59–77% of intention variance. The variance explained by the two models was similar. When subjective norm or self-identity was non-significant in the traditional model, the corresponding Norm Balance component was significant in the Norm Balance model, except for eating a low-fat diet. When both subjective norm and self-identity were significant in the traditional model, the two Norm Balance components were significant in the Norm Balance model with increased coefficients. Conclusions: The proposed approach of Norm Balance provides a different view about the significance and coefficients of subjective norm and self-identity toward intention prediction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories)
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research)
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10 pages, 871 KiB  
Opinion
The Influence of Health Behavior Theory on Implementation Practice and Science: Brief Review and Commentary
Pharmacy 2022, 10(5), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy10050115 - 18 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1825
Abstract
As research defines new treatments and policies to improve the health of patients, an increasing challenge has been to translate these insights into routine clinical practice to benefit patients and society. An important exploration is how theories of human behavior change fit into [...] Read more.
As research defines new treatments and policies to improve the health of patients, an increasing challenge has been to translate these insights into routine clinical practice to benefit patients and society. An important exploration is how theories of human behavior change fit into the science of implementation and quality improvement. In this paper, we begin with a brief review of the intellectual roots of implementation science and quality improvement, followed by a discussion of how theories and principles of behavior change can inform both goals and challenges in using behavior change theories. The insights offered through health behavior change theory have led to changes in how we plan for implementation and select, develop, design and tailor implementation interventions and strategies. While the degree to which organizational and external contexts influence the behavior of providers in these organizations varies widely, some degree of context external to the individual is important and needs adequate consideration. In short, health behavior change theory is essential but not sufficient to integrate in most implementation efforts, where priority must be given to both individual factors and contexts in which individuals operate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories)
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research)
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8 pages, 510 KiB  
Article
Adherence to and Persistence with Adalimumab Therapy among Swedish Patients with Crohn’s Disease
Pharmacy 2022, 10(4), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy10040087 - 20 Jul 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1526
Abstract
Objectives: (1) to determine the adherence and persistence rates of adalimumab therapy among Swedish patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), and (2) to compare self-administration devices to predict the medication adherence and persistence. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the Swedish National Board [...] Read more.
Objectives: (1) to determine the adherence and persistence rates of adalimumab therapy among Swedish patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), and (2) to compare self-administration devices to predict the medication adherence and persistence. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare database during a unique time period, when both the pen and the syringe were available. The pen was proposed to indicate a larger extent of internal control, according to health locus of control. Medication adherence was defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥ 0.8. A patient was considered nonpersistent if the time between any two dispensing records, minus the days of supply dispensed exceeded 180 days. The predictors of adherence were evaluated using a logistic regression, and the predictors of persistence were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Among the 1083 patients studied, 89% were adherent and 77% were persistent. The patients using the pen and the patients treated in gastroenterology centers were more likely to be adherent and less likely to be nonpersistent. Conclusions: The adherence rate to adalimumab therapy was 89% and the one-year persistence rate was 70%. The pen and treatment in a gastroenterology center had a positive impact on the adherence and persistence among Swedish patients with CD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories)
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research)
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19 pages, 997 KiB  
Review
The Moderating Power of Impulsivity: A Systematic Literature Review Examining the Theory of Planned Behavior
Pharmacy 2022, 10(4), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy10040085 - 18 Jul 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2669
Abstract
The theory of planned behavior (TPB) states that behavioral intention is the best predictor of actual behavior change. However, intention explains only a portion of the variance in behavior. Of specific interest is the question of which moderating or mediating variables can be [...] Read more.
The theory of planned behavior (TPB) states that behavioral intention is the best predictor of actual behavior change. However, intention explains only a portion of the variance in behavior. Of specific interest is the question of which moderating or mediating variables can be leveraged to aid health promotion interventions utilizing the tenets of behavioral economics (delay discounting and commitment contracts) in the intention–behavior pathway. Impulsivity has been postulated to fill this role and may be applied to multiple behaviors. We aim to determine if impulsivity moderates the association between intention and actual behavior in the TPB, to discover what other variables may moderate or mediate this association, and to apply the findings to future studies in the field of behavioral economics. To this end, a systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, PsychINFO, and Embase online databases. Eligible studies in peer-reviewed journals published prior to November 2021 were selected. Thirty-three studies were included in the final review, examining physical activity, diet, preventive health, mental health, addiction, and medication adherence behaviors. Three main concepts emerged: (1) impulsivity moderates the association between intention and behavior change; (2) self-efficacy moderates the association between intention and behavior change; and (3) planning and self-efficacy contribute to moderated mediation. This review demonstrates a gap in the literature regarding the application of the TPB to the intention–behavior pathway for health behaviors. Future studies in behavioral economics may leverage the variables of impulsivity, self-efficacy, and planning to predict follow-through in this area and to develop targeted change initiatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories)
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research)
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16 pages, 1291 KiB  
Article
Explaining Correlates of Cervical Cancer Screening among Minority Women in the United States
Pharmacy 2022, 10(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy10010030 - 15 Feb 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3009
Abstract
Globally, cervical cancer is the fourth leading cause of death among women. While overall cervical cancer rates have decreased over the last few decades, minority women continue to be disproportionately affected compared to White women. Given the paucity of theory-based interventions to promote [...] Read more.
Globally, cervical cancer is the fourth leading cause of death among women. While overall cervical cancer rates have decreased over the last few decades, minority women continue to be disproportionately affected compared to White women. Given the paucity of theory-based interventions to promote Pap smear tests among minority women, this cross-sectional study attempts to examine the correlates of cervical cancer screening by Pap test using the Multi-theory Model (MTM) as a theoretical paradigm among minority women in the United States (U.S.). Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was done for testing the construct validity of the survey instrument. Data were analyzed through bivariate and multivariate tests. In a sample of 364 minority women, nearly 31% (n = 112) of women reported not having received a Pap test within the past three years compared to the national rate (20.8%) for all women. The MTM constructs of participatory dialogue, behavioral confidence, and changes in the physical environment explained a substantial proportion of variance (49.5%) in starting the behavior of getting Pap tests, while the constructs of emotional transformation, practice for change, and changes in the social environment, along with lack of health insurance and annual household income of less than $25,000, significantly explained the variance (73.6%) of the likelihood to sustain the Pap test behavior of getting it every three years. Among those who have had a Pap smear (n = 252), healthcare insurance, emotional transformation, practice for change, and changes in the social environment predicted nearly 83.3% of the variance in sustaining Pap smear test uptake behavior (adjusted R2 = 0.833, F = 45.254, p < 0.001). This study validates the need for health promotion interventions based on MTM to be implemented to address the disparities of lower cervical cancer screenings among minority women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories)
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research)
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20 pages, 1016 KiB  
Article
Using the Multi-Theory Model (MTM) of Health Behavior Change to Explain the Correlates of Mammography Screening among Asian American Women
Pharmacy 2021, 9(3), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy9030126 - 15 Jul 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4958
Abstract
Globally, breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The incidence of breast cancer has been growing among Asian American women. Mammography is a screening procedure that provides early diagnosis for the timely treatment to reduce premature mortality due to breast cancer. [...] Read more.
Globally, breast cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The incidence of breast cancer has been growing among Asian American women. Mammography is a screening procedure that provides early diagnosis for the timely treatment to reduce premature mortality due to breast cancer. However, there are no national data available that summarize the rates of mammography screening among Asian American women. Some small-scale studies have reported low rates of mammography uptake among Asian American women. This cross-sectional study utilized the fourth-generation, multi-theory model (MTM) of health behavior change to explain the correlates of mammography screening among Asian American women between the ages of 45–54 years. A 44-item instrument was evaluated for face, content, and construct validity (using structural equation modeling) and reliability (Cronbach’s alpha) and administered electronically to a nationally representative sample of Asian American women (n = 374). The study found that Asian American women who have had received mammograms in the past 12 months as per recommendations, all three constructs of MTM, namely, participatory dialogue (β = 0.156, p < 0.05), behavioral confidence (β = 0.236, p < 0.001), and changes in the physical environment (β = 0.426, p < 0.001) were statistically significant and crucial in their decision to initiate getting a mammogram, accounting for a substantial 49.9% of the variance in the decision to seek mammography. The study also found that the MTM constructs of emotional transformation (β = 0.437, p < 0.001) and practice for change (β = 0.303, p < 0.001) were significant for maintaining the repeated behavior of getting annual mammograms and were responsible for 53.9% of the variance. This evidence-based study validates the use of MTM in designing and evaluating mammography screening promotion programs among Asian American women aged 45–54 years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advancing the Knowledge and Application of Health Behavior Theories)
(This article belongs to the Section Pharmacy Practice and Practice-Based Research)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Cognitive dissonance and impacts upon medication nonadherence
Authors: Jack Fincham, Ph.D.
Affiliation: Osher Life Long Learning Institute, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, U.S.A.

Title: The Social Ecological Model of Health and its application
Authors: Kelley Crews, Ph.D.
Affiliation: The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, U.S.A.

Title: Determination of anticoagulants use among nursing home residents with atrial fibrillation
Authors: Ning Zhang, Ph.D.
Affiliation: Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Title: Using the Behavioral Learning Theory to examine COVID-19 pandemic
Authors: Dhananjay Nayakankuppam, Ph.D.
Affiliation: The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, U.S.A.

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