Topic Editors

Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
Institute of Human Factors and Ergonomics, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
School of Design, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Theories and Applications of Human-Computer Interaction

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
1854

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human–computer interaction (HCI) is a field of study exploring how people use technological systems, with a focus on interfaces between people and technological systems. It is a multidisciplinary field that incorporates computer science, behavioral sciences, human factors, psychology, engineering, design, sociology, anthropology, etc. HCI addresses the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive technological systems with the central objective of making systems more user-friendly and usable for improved performance, satisfaction, safety, and experience in human use.

The past few decades have seen the rapid development and application of varied new forms of advanced technologies for interaction in our daily life and work. Examples include smartphones, wearable devices, robots, virtual reality, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, ChatGPT, and other AI-based systems. Despite the wide recognition of the fact that emerging technologies benefit human society , the evidence base for optimal/appropriate HCI regarding these technologies remains limited. Thus, HCI has now become an interdisciplinary field in urgent need of significant innovation, extension, and breakthroughs in terms of both theories and applications. In this regard, this Special Issue is interested in empirical and review studies that address innovations in theories, methods, designs, evaluations, and applications of HCI encountered in a wide range of personal and public contexts at present and in the near future.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  • Innovations in HCI theories, methods, design, evaluation, and applications;
  • Innovative HCI applications in industry and complex systems;
  • Intelligent human–computer interaction;
  • HCI in emerging technologies;
  • Human–robot interaction;
  • Human–AI interaction;
  • Human factors and ergonomics of HCI;
  • Multimodal HCI;
  • User experience and usability;
  • Interface design; Natural user interface;
  • Interaction in virtual/augmented/mixed reality;
  • Multimodal design and evaluation;
  • Psychosocial behaviors with technology;
  • Computers in human behavior. 

Dr. Da Tao
Dr. Tingru Zhang
Dr. Hailiang Wang
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • human–computer interaction
  • multimodal HCI
  • human factors
  • user experience
  • interface design
  • artificial intelligence
  • human–AI interaction
  • natural user interface

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Electronics
electronics
2.9 4.7 2012 15.6 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Healthcare
healthcare
2.8 2.7 2013 19.5 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Informatics
informatics
3.1 4.8 2014 30.3 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Machine Learning and Knowledge Extraction
make
3.9 8.5 2019 19.9 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Sensors
sensors
3.9 6.8 2001 17 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Systems
systems
1.9 3.3 2013 16.8 Days CHF 2400 Submit
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information
ijgi
3.4 6.2 2012 35.5 Days CHF 1700 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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13 pages, 9082 KiB  
Article
Exploring Metaphorical Transformations of a Safety Boundary Wall in Virtual Reality
by Haozhao Qin, Yechang Qin, Jianchun Su and Yang Tian
Sensors 2024, 24(10), 3187; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24103187 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 326
Abstract
Current virtual reality (VR) devices enable users to visually immerse themselves in the virtual world, contributing to their limited awareness of bystanders’ presence. To prevent collisions when bystanders intrude into VR users’ activity area, it is necessary to intuitively alert VR users to [...] Read more.
Current virtual reality (VR) devices enable users to visually immerse themselves in the virtual world, contributing to their limited awareness of bystanders’ presence. To prevent collisions when bystanders intrude into VR users’ activity area, it is necessary to intuitively alert VR users to the intrusion event and the intruder’s position, especially in cases where bystanders intrude from the side or behind the VR user. Existing intruder awareness cues fail to intuitively present the intrusion event in such cases. We propose a novel intruder awareness cue called “BrokenWall” by applying a metaphor of “a wall breached by invading soldiers” to the VR user’s safety boundary wall. Specifically, BrokenWall refers to a safety boundary wall with a gap appearing in front of a VR user and rotating, guiding the user’s attention toward an intruder coming from the side or behind the VR user. We conducted an empirical study (N = 30) comparing BrokenWall with existing awareness cue techniques, Halo and Radar. Halo employs a sphere to represent the intruder, with the size indicating proximity and the position reflecting the direction. Radar employs a radar map to visualize the intruder’s position. The results showed that the BrokenWall awareness cue not only significantly reduces the time needed for users to detect an intruder but also has superior performance in subjective ratings. Based on our findings, we have established a design space for an interactive safety boundary wall to facilitate interactions between VR users and bystanders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Theories and Applications of Human-Computer Interaction)
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19 pages, 1405 KiB  
Article
Investigating User Experience of VR Art Exhibitions: The Impact of Immersion, Satisfaction, and Expectation Confirmation
by Lin Cheng, Junping Xu and Younghwan Pan
Informatics 2024, 11(2), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/informatics11020030 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 418
Abstract
As an innovative form in the digital age, VR art exhibitions have attracted increasing attention. This study aims to explore the key factors that influence visitors’ continuance intention to VR art exhibitions using the expectation confirmation model and experience economy theory and to [...] Read more.
As an innovative form in the digital age, VR art exhibitions have attracted increasing attention. This study aims to explore the key factors that influence visitors’ continuance intention to VR art exhibitions using the expectation confirmation model and experience economy theory and to explore ways to enhance visitor immersion in virtual environments. We conducted a quantitative study of 235 art professionals and enthusiasts, conducted using the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), to examine the complex relationship between confirmation (CON), Perceived Usefulness (PU), Aesthetic Experiences (AE), Escapist Experiences (EE), Satisfaction (SAT), and Continuance Intention (CI). The results show that confirmation plays a key role in shaping PU, AE, and EE, which in turn positively affect visitors’ SAT. Among these factors, AE positively impacts PU, but EE have no impact. A comprehensive theoretical model was then constructed based on the findings. This research provides empirical support for designing and improving VR art exhibitions. It also sheds light on the application of expectation confirmation theory and experience economy theory in the art field to improve user experience and provides theoretical guidance for the sustainable development of virtual digital art environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Theories and Applications of Human-Computer Interaction)
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16 pages, 20538 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Role of Video Playback Visual Cues in Object Retrieval Tasks
by Yechang Qin, Jianchun Su, Haozhao Qin and Yang Tian
Sensors 2024, 24(10), 3147; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24103147 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 359
Abstract
Searching for objects is a common task in daily life and work. For augmented reality (AR) devices without spatial perception systems, the image of the object’s last appearance serves as a common search assistance. Compared to using only images as visual cues, videos [...] Read more.
Searching for objects is a common task in daily life and work. For augmented reality (AR) devices without spatial perception systems, the image of the object’s last appearance serves as a common search assistance. Compared to using only images as visual cues, videos capturing the process of object placement can provide procedural guidance, potentially enhancing users’ search efficiency. However, complete video playback capturing the entire object placement process as visual cues can be excessively lengthy, requiring users to invest significant viewing time. To explore whether segmented or accelerated video playback can still assist users in object retrieval tasks effectively, we conducted a user study. The results indicated that when video playback is covering the first appearance of the object’s destination to the object’s final appearance (referred to as the destination appearance, DA) and playing at normal speed, search time and cognitive load were significantly reduced. Subsequently, we designed a second user study to evaluate the performance of video playback compared to image cues in object retrieval tasks. The results showed that combining the DA playback starting point with images of the object’s last appearance further reduced search time and cognitive load. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Theories and Applications of Human-Computer Interaction)
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