Topic Editors

Departament of Food Quality and Safety Management, Poznan University Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 31, PL-60642 Poznan, Poland
Dr. Constantinos G. Tsiafoulis
1. NMR Centre, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Departament of Chemistry, University of Ioannina, Greece
2. School of Natural Sciences and Technology, Hellenic Open University, Patras, Greece

Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages

Abstract submission deadline
30 November 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 January 2025
Viewed by
2816

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Topic, entitled “Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages", offers a forum for the rapid publication of original articles and reviews on food analysis, with a special emphasis on new challenges and trends. Currently, techniques such as liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis are essential to the characterization, classification, and authentication of a wide range of agri-food products.

Moreover, among the spectroscopic techniques and methods employed, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR), through a plethora of methods (among them the recently introduced NMR spin chromatography or the diffusion-ordered spectroscopy), has also enriched and enhanced the above-mentioned goals. NMR techniques in combination with multivariate data analysis have strongly contributed to the expansion of the -omics approach in foods, namely foodomics.

Beyond these well-established options, research detailing new instrumental techniques, such as ion mobility spectrometry and microchip-based devices, novel NMR methods and benchtop NMR, will also be welcome.

Dr. Anna M. Kaczmarek
Dr. Constantinos G. Tsiafoulis
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • food
  • beverages
  • chromatography
  • separations
  • capillary electrophoresis
  • foodomics
  • nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Beverages
beverages
3.5 5.8 2015 18.5 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Molecules
molecules
4.6 6.7 1996 14.6 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Nutrients
nutrients
5.9 9.0 2009 14.5 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Separations
separations
2.6 2.5 2014 13.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
15 pages, 2756 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Key Odorants in Lushan Yunwu Tea in Response to Intercropping with Flowering Cherry
by Yinxiang Gao, Zhiyong Lei, Jigang Huang, Yongming Sun, Shuang Liu, Liping Yao, Jiaxin Liu, Wenxin Liu, Yanan Liu and Yan Chen
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081252 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 297
Abstract
Lushan Yunwu tea (LSYWT) is a famous green tea in China. However, the effects of intercropping tea with flowering cherry on the overall aroma of tea have not been well understood. In this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry [...] Read more.
Lushan Yunwu tea (LSYWT) is a famous green tea in China. However, the effects of intercropping tea with flowering cherry on the overall aroma of tea have not been well understood. In this study, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was used for analysis. A total of 54 volatile compounds from eight chemical classes were identified in tea samples from both the intercropping and pure-tea-plantation groups. Principal component analysis (PCA), orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), and odor activity value (OAV) methods combined with sensory evaluation identified cis-jasmone, nonanal, and linalool as the key aroma compounds in the intercropping group. Benzaldehyde, α-farnesene, and methyl benzene were identified as the main volatile compounds in the flowering cherry using headspace solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC–MS). These findings will enrich the research on tea aroma chemistry and offer new insights into the product development and quality improvement of LSYWT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2524 KiB  
Article
Development, Validation, and Application of High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Diode-Array Detection Method for Simultaneous Determination of Ginkgolic Acids and Ginkgols in Ginkgo biloba
by Isaac Duah Boateng, Fengnan Li and Xiao-Ming Yang
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1250; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081250 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 287
Abstract
Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBLs), which comprise many phytoconstituents, also contain a toxic substance named ginkgolic acid (GA). Our previous research showed that heating could decarboxylate and degrade GA into ginkgols with high levels of bioactivity. Several methods are available to measure GA in [...] Read more.
Ginkgo biloba leaves (GBLs), which comprise many phytoconstituents, also contain a toxic substance named ginkgolic acid (GA). Our previous research showed that heating could decarboxylate and degrade GA into ginkgols with high levels of bioactivity. Several methods are available to measure GA in GBLs, but no analytical method has been developed to measure ginkgols and GA simultaneously. Hence, for the first time, an HPLC-DAD method was established to simultaneously determine GA and ginkgols using acetonitrile (0.01% trifluoroacetic acid, v/v) as mobile phase A and water (0.01% trifluoroacetic acid, v/v) as mobile phase B. The gradient elution conditions were: 0–30 min, 75–90% phase A; 30–35 min, 90–90% phase A; 35–36 min, 90–75% phase A; 36–46 min, 75–75% phase A. The detection wavelength of GA and ginkgol were 210 and 270 nm, respectively. The flow rate and injection volume were 1.0 mL/min and 50 μL, respectively. The linearity was excellent (R2 > 0.999), and the RSD of the precision, stability, and repeatability of the total ginkgols was 0.20%, 2.21%, and 2.45%, respectively, in six parallel determinations. The recoveries for the low, medium, and high groups were 96.58%, 97.67%, and 101.52%, respectively. The limit of detection of ginkgol C13:0, C15:1, and C17:1 was 0.61 ppm, 0.50 ppm, and 0.06 ppm, respectively. The limit of quantification of ginkgol C13:0, C15:1, and C17:1 was 2.01 ppm, 1.65 ppm, and 0.20 ppm, respectively. Finally, this method accurately measured the GA and ginkgol content in ginkgo leaves and ginkgo tea products (ginkgo black tea, ginkgo dark tea, ginkgo white tea, and ginkgo green tea), whereas principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to help visualize the association between GA and ginkgols and five different processing methods for GBLs. Thus, this research provides an efficient and accurate quantitative method for the subsequent detection of GA and ginkgols in ginkgo tea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 10953 KiB  
Article
Detection and Comparison of Volatile Organic Compounds in Four Varieties of Hawthorn Using HS-GC-IMS
by Lijun Zhu, Feilin Ou, Yun Xiang, Bin Wang, Yingchao Mao, Lingfeng Zhu, Qun Zhang and Chang Lei
Separations 2024, 11(4), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/separations11040100 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 498
Abstract
Hawthorn is a type of natural food with significant medicinal and nutritional properties; it has been listed in the “Both Food and Drug” list by the Chinese Ministry of Health Item List since 1997. However, hawthorn varieties have complex origins, and there are [...] Read more.
Hawthorn is a type of natural food with significant medicinal and nutritional properties; it has been listed in the “Both Food and Drug” list by the Chinese Ministry of Health Item List since 1997. However, hawthorn varieties have complex origins, and there are significant differences in the content, type, and medicinal efficacy of the chemically active ingredients in different varieties of hawthorn. This leads to the phenomenon of mixed varieties and substandard products being passed off as high-quality. In this work, by using headspace gas chromatography–ion mobility spectrometry (HS-GC-IMS), we identified and analyzed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in four varieties of hawthorn, establishing their characteristic fingerprints. As a result, a total of 153 peaks were detected, and 139 VOCs were also identified. As shown by the fingerprint profiles, the different hawthorn samples contained different VOCs. Meanwhile, by using principal component analysis (PCA), Euclidean distance, and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), the relationship between the VOCs found in the different varieties of hawthorn was revealed. This study developed a simple, fast, accurate, and sensitive method for identifying, tracking, and evaluating hawthorn varieties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1070 KiB  
Article
Increasing the Amounts of Bioactive Components in American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolium L.) Leaves Using Far-Infrared Irradiation
by Xuan Wang, Myungjin Kim, Ruoqi Han, Jiarui Liu, Xuemei Sun, Shuyang Sun, Chengwu Jin and Dongha Cho
Foods 2024, 13(4), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13040607 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 482
Abstract
Both the roots and leaves of American ginseng contain ginsenosides and polyphenols. The impact of thermal processing on enhancing the biological activities of the root by altering its component composition has been widely reported. However, the effects of far-infrared irradiation (FIR), an efficient [...] Read more.
Both the roots and leaves of American ginseng contain ginsenosides and polyphenols. The impact of thermal processing on enhancing the biological activities of the root by altering its component composition has been widely reported. However, the effects of far-infrared irradiation (FIR), an efficient heat treatment method, on the bioactive components of the leaves remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of FIR heat treatment between 160 and 200 °C on the deglycosylation and dehydration rates of the bioactive components in American ginseng leaves. As the temperature was increased, the amounts of common ginsenosides decreased while those of rare ginsenosides increased. After FIR heat treatment of American ginseng leaves at an optimal 190 °C, the highest total polyphenolic content and kaempferol content were detected, the antioxidant activity was significantly enhanced, and the amounts of the rare ginsenosides F4, Rg6, Rh4, Rk3, Rk1, Rg3, and Rg5 were 41, 5, 37, 64, 222, 17, and 266 times higher than those in untreated leaves, respectively. Moreover, the radical scavenging rates for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and the reducing power of the treated leaf extracts were 2.17, 1.86, and 1.77 times higher, respectively. Hence, FIR heat treatment at 190 °C is an efficient method for producing beneficial bioactive components from American ginseng leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 2432 KiB  
Article
Physical and Chemical Properties, Flavor and Organoleptic Characteristics of a Walnut and Purple Rice Fermented Plant Drink
by Hongyu Mu, Tianyi Dai, Si Huang, Kuan Wu, Mingming Wang, Chunlei Tan, Feng Zhang, Jun Sheng and Cunchao Zhao
Foods 2024, 13(3), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13030400 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 807
Abstract
In recent years, green and healthy foods have attracted much attention. Plant-based foods have become an alternative to animal-derived foods. In this study, we used walnut and purple rice as the primary raw materials to produce a fermented plant drink. The process included [...] Read more.
In recent years, green and healthy foods have attracted much attention. Plant-based foods have become an alternative to animal-derived foods. In this study, we used walnut and purple rice as the primary raw materials to produce a fermented plant drink. The process included boiling, mixing, grinding, inoculation, fermentation, and sterilization. We then analyzed the similarities and differences between the resulting walnut and purple rice fermented plant drink and an unfermented walnut and purple rice plant drink, as well as dairy-based yoghurt, in terms of physical chemistry, flavor, and sensory characteristics. We also examined the similarities and differences between the walnut and purple rice fermented plant drink and room-temperature yoghurt. The study results revealed that the walnut and purple rice fermented plant drink exhibited greater viscosity than the walnut and purple rice unfermented plant drink and room-temperature yoghurt. Additionally, the former displayed enhanced stability and recovery ability. Notably, distinguishable differences were observed between the three samples in terms of the presence of unknown volatiles and the umami signal, as indicated by electronic nose/tongue and GC-IMS analyses. The umami flavor of the walnut and purple rice fermented plant drink surpasses that of room-temperature yoghurt, while its taste is less salty than that of the walnut and purple rice plant drink. Despite possessing a weaker aroma than dairy-based yogurt, it is more potent than the walnut and purple rice plant drink. Additionally, its relative abundance of olefins, ketones, and alcohols enhances its unique flavor profile, surpassing both other options. Based on sensory analysis, it can be deduced that walnut and purple rice fermented plant drink has the highest overall acceptance rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Advances in Analysis of Food and Beverages)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop