Topic Editors

Dr. Jeff Victoroff
Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA
Dr. Neil Archibald
Consultant Neurologist, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough TS4 3BW, UK

Neurorehabilitation in Movement Disorders and Neurodegenerative Diseases

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
993

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurorehabilitation (NR) is conventionally thought of as a suite of therapies intended to aid recovery from neurological injury. However, recent evidence shows that NR may also mitigate the effects of, or perhaps slow the progression of, movement disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. This Issue will outline the new evidence that multiple modes of therapy can serve as effective interventions. Physical therapy may improve motor function. Occupational therapy may improve the capacity for activities of daily living. Speech therapy may not only enhance productive and receptive language but also address dysarthria and dysphagia. Cognitive rehabilitation has been shown to be effective in improving working memory and may also improve attention, concentration, and problem solving. Therapies that employ the arts, such as music and dance, appear to have beneficial effects. New technologies are also finding applications in NR, including virtual reality and transcranial magnetic stimulation. It remains unclear to what extent NR therapies offer practical workarounds for neuropsychiatric impairments versus actually modifying the course of an underlying disorder. However, the possibility exists that some forms of NR have salutary effects on pathophysiology: evidence is emerging that the mechanism of efficacy may be related to the enhancement of neural plasticity.

Dr. Jeff Victoroff
Dr. Neil Archibald
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • neurorehabilitation
  • movement disorders
  • neurodegeneration
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • virtual reality
  • repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Brain Sciences
brainsci
3.3 3.9 2011 15.6 Days CHF 2200 Submit
Journal of Clinical Medicine
jcm
3.9 5.4 2012 17.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Neurology International
neurolint
3.0 2.2 2009 23.3 Days CHF 1600 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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12 pages, 724 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Upright Stance and Vision on a Cognitive Task in Elderly Subjects and Patients with Parkinson’s Disease
by Marta Mirando, Rachele Penati, Marco Godi, Marica Giardini and Antonio Nardone
Brain Sci. 2024, 14(4), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci14040305 - 24 Mar 2024
Viewed by 611
Abstract
Standing compared to sitting enhances cognitive performance in healthy subjects. The effect of stance on cognitive performance has been addressed here in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). We hypothesized that a simple cognitive task would be less enhanced in PwPD by standing with [...] Read more.
Standing compared to sitting enhances cognitive performance in healthy subjects. The effect of stance on cognitive performance has been addressed here in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). We hypothesized that a simple cognitive task would be less enhanced in PwPD by standing with respect to sitting, because of a larger cognitive effort for maintenance of standing posture than in healthy subjects. We recruited 40 subjects (20 PwPD and 20 age-matched healthy subjects, HE). Each participant performed an arithmetic task (backward counting aloud by 7) in two postural states, sitting and standing, with eyes open (EO) and with eyes closed (EC). All trials lasted 60 s and were randomized across subjects and conditions. The number of correct subtractions per trial was an index of counting efficiency and the ratio of correct subtractions to total subtractions was an index of accuracy. All conditions collapsed, the efficiency of the cognitive task was significantly lower in PwPD than HE, whilst accuracy was affected to a lower extent. Efficiency significantly improved from sitting to standing in HE under both visual conditions whilst only with EO in PwPD. Accuracy was not affected by posture or vision in either group. We suggest that standing, compared to sitting, increases arousal, thus improving the cognitive performance in HE. Conversely, in PwPD this improvement was present only with vision, possibly due to their greater balance impairment with EC consuming an excess of attentional resources. These findings have implications for balance control and the risk of falling in PwPD in the absence of visual cues. Full article
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