Topic Editors

Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment (Di3A), University of Catania, Via Santa Sofia, 100, 95123 Catania, Italy
DeFENS, Department of Food, Environmental and Nutritional Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy
Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, 3-5 Manastur Street, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Postharvest Research Center, Valencian Institute of Agrarian Research (IVIA), 46113 Valencia, Spain

Edible Films and Coatings Based on Functionalized Molecules Extracted from Food Industry By-Products

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 November 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 January 2024)
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4642

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The food industry has witnessed important changes in recent years. Most of these changes are strictly related to environmental concerns, which led to greater attention being paid to both the food waste problem and wastefulness of materials, thus highlighting sustainable topics. For these reasons, the food industries are increasingly looking at the food quality, protecting the food source and reducing the packaging volume or its environmental impact, e.g., by using new biodegradable configurations.

New technologies are being applied to improve food quality and extend the shelf-life of perishable foods. For example, the potential use of edible films enriched with natural bioactive compounds, or the application of food coatings, or biodegradable materials or biopolymers, are changing market needs and rules. The application of an edible coating to fruits and vegetables, in particular, is recommended to improve the quality and texture, and to maintain the physiological properties, as well as to reduce the moisture loss and respiration rate. Many studies are focused on the application of different types of edible films and coatings on foodstuffs; for this purpose, many resources are used, including polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and fats, polymeric biocomposites, and others. These biopolymers are mainly used due to their non-toxicity, biodegradability, biocompatibility, and antimicrobial properties, and other positive features that can be further improved using active compounds, such as plant extracts, essential oils, antioxidants, bacteriocins or microorganisms.

At present, the new challenge is the opportunity to enhance edible films and coating characteristics with the addition of active compounds recovered from food industry by-products, which can be obtained from food waste, and, in this way, re-closing the cycle of processing and waste inside the food industry chain.

The present Special Issue aims to gather outstanding cross-disciplinary approaches, applying a combination of modern technologies to improve knowledge of the application of edible films and coatings enriched with molecules of different origins and to reduce costs to provide very valuable information to farmers and manufacturers. Topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Edible coating applications to improve food or packaging solutions.
  • Extraction techniques for active compounds from food industry by-products.
  • Enriching techniques of coatings applications.
  • Innovative edible compounds used as coatings.
  • The application of industry by-products to improve sustainability.
  • Green extraction of functional molecules from the food industry chain.

Dr. Valeria Rizzo
Prof. Dr. Stefano Farris
Dr. Teodora Emilia Coldea
Prof. Dr. Lluís Palou
Topic Editors

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Beverages
beverages
3.5 5.8 2015 18.5 Days CHF 1600
Coatings
coatings
3.4 4.7 2011 13.8 Days CHF 2600
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900
Molecules
molecules
4.6 6.7 1996 14.6 Days CHF 2700
Polymers
polymers
5.0 6.6 2009 13.7 Days CHF 2700

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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17 pages, 836 KiB  
Article
Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose and Gum Arabic Composite Edible Coatings Amended with Geraniol to Control Postharvest Brown Rot and Maintain Quality of Cold-Stored Plums
by Zahra Sadat Asgarian, Lluís Palou, Ricardo Felipe Lima de Souza, Paloma G. Quintanilla, Verònica Taberner, Rouhollah Karimi and María Bernardita Pérez-Gago
Foods 2023, 12(15), 2978; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12152978 - 07 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1021
Abstract
In this study, the effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and gum Arabic (GA) edible coatings amended with 0.2% geraniol (GE) were evaluated for the control of brown rot, caused by Monilinia fructicola, on artificially inoculated plums (Prunus salicina Lindl., cv. Angeleno) [...] Read more.
In this study, the effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and gum Arabic (GA) edible coatings amended with 0.2% geraniol (GE) were evaluated for the control of brown rot, caused by Monilinia fructicola, on artificially inoculated plums (Prunus salicina Lindl., cv. Angeleno) stored for 5 weeks at 1 °C. Brown rot is the most important pre- and postharvest fungal disease of stone fruits, causing severe economic losses worldwide. Geraniol is an important constituent of many essential oils that can be obtained as a byproduct from different industrial procedures, such as those of the juice industry. Fruit postharvest quality was also evaluated after 5 and 8 weeks of storage at 1 °C, followed by 3 days at 7 °C plus 5 days at 20 °C, simulating packinghouse, transport, and retail shelf-life conditions, respectively. HPMC coatings containing 0.2% GE reduced the incidence and severity of brown rot by 37.5 and 64.8%, respectively, compared to uncoated fruit after 5 weeks of storage at 1 °C. HPMC-coated plums, with and without GE, showed the highest level of firmness, the lowest change in external peel color parameters (L*, a*, b*, C*, hue), and the lowest flesh bleeding compared to uncoated control and GA-coated samples throughout the entire storage period, which correlated with a higher gas barrier of these coatings without negatively affecting sensory quality. Furthermore, the HPMC-0.2% GE coating provided the highest gloss to coated plums, showing the potential of this coating as a safe and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional fungicides and waxes for brown rot control and quality maintenance of cold-stored plums. Full article
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16 pages, 2287 KiB  
Article
Postharvest Application of Potato Starch Edible Coatings with Sodium Benzoate to Reduce Sour Rot and Preserve Mandarin Fruit Quality
by Lourdes Soto-Muñoz, María B. Pérez-Gago, Victoria Martínez-Blay and Lluís Palou
Coatings 2023, 13(2), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13020296 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2117
Abstract
Starch is a biodegradable polymeric carbohydrate that can easily form films and coatings and can readily be obtained from some food industry by-products and wastes, which may contribute to the circular bioeconomy. In this work, we studied the potential of two edible coating [...] Read more.
Starch is a biodegradable polymeric carbohydrate that can easily form films and coatings and can readily be obtained from some food industry by-products and wastes, which may contribute to the circular bioeconomy. In this work, we studied the potential of two edible coating emulsions based on pregelatinized potato starch (PPS) and glyceryl monostearate (GMS) alone (F6 and F10) or formulated with the food additive sodium benzoate (SB, 2%) (F6/SB and F10/SB) to control sour rot, an important citrus postharvest disease caused by the fungus Geotrichum citri-aurantii, and maintain postharvest quality of cold-stored ‘Orri’ mandarins. The PPS-GMS coating application was compared to dipping in water (uncoated controls) and dipping in a 2% SB (w/v) aqueous solution. The results showed that the coating F10/SB was the most promising treatment to control sour rot on mandarins, with reductions in disease incidence with respect to the uncoated control samples of 94, 69, and 55% after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of storage at 5 °C, respectively. Coatings formulated without SB were ineffective. Regarding fruit quality, the coating F10 was the most effective to reduce weight loss, maintain firmness, and provide gloss on mandarins stored at 5 °C for up to 6 weeks followed by a shelf-life period of 1 week at 20 °C. The addition of SB to the PPS-GMS coatings adversely affected these coating properties, but the coating F10/SB still reduced weight loss compared to uncoated controls without negatively affecting the fruit physicochemical (juice titratable acidity, soluble solids content, and volatiles content) and sensory quality (overall flavor, off-flavors, external aspect). Overall, the coating F10/SB showed the greatest potential for commercial use as an efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional fungicides and waxes for sour rot control and quality preservation of cold-stored mandarins. Full article
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