Topic Editors

Prof. Dr. Hongtao Sun
1. The Harold & Inge Marcus Department of Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (IGDP), The Pennsylvania State University, 220 Leonhard Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
2. Department of Biomedical Engineering (by Courtesy), Materials Research Institute (MRI), The Pennsylvania State University, 220 Leonhard Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA
Dr. Jian Zhu
1. State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
2. Hunan Key Laboratory of Two-Dimensional Materials, Engineering Research Center of Advanced Catalysis, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China
Dr. Junfei Liang
School of Energy and Power Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051, China

Emerging Trends in Advanced Materials and Technologies for Sustainable Energy Storage

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

This multidisciplinary topic focuses on the latest advances in energy storage technologies, with a specific emphasis on high energy density and high power density, safety, recycling, and the utilization of advanced in situ characterization tools and data-driven approaches. As the demand for efficient and sustainable energy storage solutions continues to grow, it is crucial to explore advancements in energy storage technologies and develop strategies to address safety concerns and enable effective recycling processes.

The multidisciplinary topic encompasses a wide range of materials, chemistries, and interfaces for lithium-ion batteries (LiBs), lithium metal batteries (LMBs), hybrid supercapacitors, and alternative battery systems such as sodium (Na), potassium (K), aluminum (Al), magnesium (Mg), and other ion- or element-based batteries. These technologies offer the potential for higher energy and power densities, enabling the development of more efficient and powerful energy storage systems.

Additionally, the multidisciplinary topic highlights the importance of recycling in the context of energy storage technologies. With the growing number of batteries reaching the end of their life cycles, the development of effective and sustainable recycling processes is critical to minimize environmental impact and recover valuable materials. Contributions discussing recycling strategies, methods for materials recovery, and life cycle assessments are encouraged.

Furthermore, the multidisciplinary topic promotes the use of advanced in situ characterization tools and data-driven approaches to enhance the understanding and advancement of next-generation energy storage systems. By leveraging real-time and high-resolution characterization techniques, researchers can gain valuable insights into battery materials, interfaces, and electrochemical processes. Data-driven approaches, including machine learning and computational modeling, can aid in the design and optimization of energy storage materials and devices.

Prof. Dr. Hongtao Sun
Dr. Jian Zhu
Dr. Junfei Liang
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • Li-ion battery
  • high energy density
  • high power density
  • in-situ characterization
  • data-driven
  • recycling
  • metal batteries
  • beyond Li-ion batteries

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Batteries
batteries
4.0 5.4 2015 17.7 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Clean Technologies
cleantechnol
3.8 4.5 2019 26.6 Days CHF 1600 Submit
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Materials
materials
3.4 5.2 2008 13.9 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Nanomaterials
nanomaterials
5.3 7.4 2011 13.6 Days CHF 2900 Submit

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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19 pages, 10414 KiB  
Article
Temperature Reduction as Operando Performance Recovery Procedure for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells
Energies 2024, 17(4), 774; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17040774 - 06 Feb 2024
Viewed by 499
Abstract
To efficiently mitigate the reversible performance degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, it is crucial to thoroughly understand recovery effects. In this work, the effect of operando performance recovery by temperature reduction is evaluated. The results reveal that operando reduction in cell [...] Read more.
To efficiently mitigate the reversible performance degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, it is crucial to thoroughly understand recovery effects. In this work, the effect of operando performance recovery by temperature reduction is evaluated. The results reveal that operando reduction in cell temperature from 80 °C to 45 °C yields a performance recovery of 60–70% in the current density range below 1 A cm−2 in a shorter time (1.5 h versus 10.5 h), as opposed to a known and more complex non-operando recovery procedure. Notably, the absolute recovered voltage is directly proportional to the total amount of liquid water produced during the temperature reduction. Thus, the recovery effect is likely attributed to a reorganization/rearrangement of the ionomer due to water condensation. Reduction in the charge transfer and mass transfer resistance is observed after the temperature reduction by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement. During non-operando temperature reduction (i.e., open circuit voltage (OCV) hold during recovery instead of load cycling) an even higher recovery efficiency of >80% was achieved. Full article
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