Topic Editors

1. Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal
2. Coimbra Chemistry Centre, Institute of Molecular Sciences—IMS, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra, Portugal
1. Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3000-548 Coimbra, Portugal
2. Coimbra Chemistry Centre, Institute of Molecular Sciences (IMS), Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra, Portugal
1. Department of Medical Sciences, Institute of Biomedicine-iBiMED, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2. UnIC@RISE, Department of Surgery and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Porto, 4200-319 Porto, Portugal
3. LAQV/REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
1. Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
2. Coimbra Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Translational Research, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal

Findings, Insights and Perspectives on Central Nervous System Tumors

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 March 2024)
Manuscript submission deadline
31 May 2024
Viewed by
4721

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Central nervous system (CNS) cancers are neoplastic diseases stemming from the brain and its surrounding structures, with increasing incidence, and high mortality and morbidity rates worldwide. They are characterized by their aggressive nature, marked heterogeneity and adaptation to chemoresistance, leading to a poor prognosis and clinical outcome. With the ongoing advances in research, the medical field is trying to abandon the “one size fits all” philosophy and adopt a personalized medicine approach, developing novel drug and formulation strategies that can target specific disease biomarkers. The aim of this topic is to provide a forum for researchers and clinicians to share their latest findings, insights, and perspectives on CNS tumors. We welcome original research and review articles on a range of topics related to CNS neoplasms, including, but not limited to, the following: (1) the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer initiation, progression, and resistance; (2) advances in diagnosis and treatment; (3) novel drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy; (4) new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers; (5) innovative 3D microphysiological models for cancer and tumor microenvironment research; and (6) the synergy of machine learning in designing more efficient therapies.

Dr. João Basso
Dr. Carla Vitorino
Dr. Rui Vitorino
Dr. Ana Fortuna
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • artificial intelligence
  • biomarkers
  • brain cancer
  • drug delivery
  • drug repurposing
  • glioblastoma
  • molecular signatures
  • nanomaterials
  • organoids
  • targeted therapy

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Cancers
cancers
5.2 7.4 2009 17.9 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Cells
cells
6.0 9.0 2012 16.6 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Diseases
diseases
3.7 - 2013 18.8 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Nanomaterials
nanomaterials
5.3 7.4 2010 13.6 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Pharmaceutics
pharmaceutics
5.4 6.9 2009 14.2 Days CHF 2900 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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13 pages, 1233 KiB  
Systematic Review
Dexamethasone in Patients with Glioblastoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Pierre Scheffler, Christian Fung, Shahan Momjian, Dominik Koessinger, Levin Häni, Nicolas Neidert, Jakob Straehle, Florian Volz, Oliver Schnell, Jürgen Beck and Amir El Rahal
Cancers 2024, 16(7), 1393; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers16071393 - 01 Apr 2024
Viewed by 487
Abstract
Objective: Glioblastomas are the most common primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Although modern management strategies have modestly improved overall survival, the prognosis remains dismal, with treatment side effects often impinging on the clinical course. Glioblastomas cause neurological dysfunction by infiltrating CNS tissue [...] Read more.
Objective: Glioblastomas are the most common primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Although modern management strategies have modestly improved overall survival, the prognosis remains dismal, with treatment side effects often impinging on the clinical course. Glioblastomas cause neurological dysfunction by infiltrating CNS tissue and via perifocal oedema formation. The administration of steroids such as dexamethasone is thought to alleviate symptoms by reducing oedema. However, despite its widespread use, the evidence for the administration of dexamethasone is limited and conflicting. Therefore, we aimed to review the current evidence concerning the use and outcomes of dexamethasone in patients with glioblastoma. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis according to the PRISMA-P guidelines. We performed a restricted search using the keywords “Dexamethasone” and “Glioblastoma” on PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Academic Search Premier. We included studies reporting on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in glioblastoma patients receiving higher or lower dexamethasone doses. The risk of bias was assessed using ROBINS-I. We performed a meta-analysis using a random effects model for OS and PFS. Results: Twenty-two retrospective studies were included. Higher doses of dexamethasone were associated with poorer OS (hazard ratio 1.62, confidence interval 1.40–1.88) and PFS (1.49, 1.23–1.81). OS remained worse even when studies corrected for clinical status (1.52, 1.38–1.67). Conclusion: Despite the widespread use of dexamethasone in glioblastoma patients, its use is correlated with worse long-term outcomes. Consequently, Dexamethasone administration should be restricted to selected symptomatic patients. Future prospective studies are crucial to confirm these findings. Full article
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17 pages, 2996 KiB  
Article
Revealing Pan-Histology Immunomodulatory Targets in Pediatric Central Nervous System Tumors
by Robert T. Galvin, Sampreeti Jena, Danielle Maeser, Robert Gruener and R. Stephanie Huang
Cancers 2023, 15(22), 5455; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15225455 - 17 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 916
Abstract
Background: The application of immunotherapy for pediatric CNS malignancies has been limited by the poorly understood immune landscape in this context. The aim of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of immune suppression common among pediatric brain tumors. Methods: We apply an [...] Read more.
Background: The application of immunotherapy for pediatric CNS malignancies has been limited by the poorly understood immune landscape in this context. The aim of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of immune suppression common among pediatric brain tumors. Methods: We apply an immunologic clustering algorithm validated by The Cancer Genome Atlas Project to an independent pediatric CNS transcriptomic dataset. Within the clusters, the mechanisms of immunosuppression are explored via tumor microenvironment deconvolution and survival analyses to identify relevant immunosuppressive genes with translational relevance. Results: High-grade diseases fall predominantly within an immunosuppressive subtype (C4) that independently lowers overall survival time and where common immune checkpoints (e.g., PDL1, CTLA4) are less relevant. Instead, we identify several alternative immunomodulatory targets with relevance across histologic diseases. Specifically, we show how the mechanism of EZH2 inhibition to enhance tumor immunogenicity in vitro via the upregulation of MHC class 1 is applicable to a pediatric CNS oncologic context. Meanwhile, we identify that the C3 (inflammatory) immune subtype is more common in low-grade diseases and find that immune checkpoint inhibition may be an effective way to curb progression for this subset. Conclusions: Three predominant immunologic clusters are identified across pediatric brain tumors. Among high-risk diseases, the predominant immune cluster is associated with recurrent immunomodulatory genes that influence immune infiltrate, including a subset that impacts survival across histologies. Full article
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22 pages, 402 KiB  
Review
Recurrent Glioblastoma: A Review of the Treatment Options
by Maria Angeles Vaz-Salgado, María Villamayor, Víctor Albarrán, Víctor Alía, Pilar Sotoca, Jesús Chamorro, Diana Rosero, Ana M. Barrill, Mercedes Martín, Eva Fernandez, José Antonio Gutierrez, Luis Mariano Rojas-Medina and Luis Ley
Cancers 2023, 15(17), 4279; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15174279 - 26 Aug 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2667
Abstract
Glioblastoma is a disease with a poor prognosis. Multiple efforts have been made to improve the long-term outcome, but the 5-year survival rate is still 5–10%. Recurrence of the disease is the usual way of progression. In this situation, there is no standard [...] Read more.
Glioblastoma is a disease with a poor prognosis. Multiple efforts have been made to improve the long-term outcome, but the 5-year survival rate is still 5–10%. Recurrence of the disease is the usual way of progression. In this situation, there is no standard treatment. Different treatment options can be considered. Among them would be reoperation or reirradiation. There are different studies that have assessed the impact on survival and the selection of patients who may benefit most from these strategies. Chemotherapy treatments have also been considered in several studies, mainly with alkylating agents, with data mostly from phase II studies. On the other hand, multiple studies have been carried out with target-directed treatments. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody with anti-angiogenic activity, has demonstrated activity in several studies, and the FDA has approved it for this indication. Several other TKI drugs have been evaluated in this setting, but no clear benefit has been demonstrated. Immunotherapy treatments have been shown to be effective in other types of tumors, and several studies have evaluated their efficacy in this disease, both immune checkpoint inhibitors, oncolytic viruses, and vaccines. This paper reviews data from different studies that have evaluated the efficacy of different forms of relapsed glioblastoma. Full article
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