Recent Advances in Remote Sensing for Wetland and Inland Water Sources

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "New Sensors, New Technologies and Machine Learning in Water Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 November 2022) | Viewed by 5849

Special Issue Editors

Institute of Intelligent System,School of Software, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, China
Interests: remote sensing; aquatic vegetation mapping; water resource management; wetland vegetation; water boundary

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Guest Editor
Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan
Interests: theoretical and fundamental problems in wireless sensor networks; algorithms in wireless sensor networks; graph algorithms
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Guest Editor
Department of Computer Science, Rowan University, New Jersey, NJ, USA
Interests: Internet of Things systems; smart cities
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, the biodiversity of the freshwater ecosystem is deteriorating at a faster rate than any other biome. Moving forward, a profound change is expected in global freshwater resources, which will significantly impact the other services that are provided by the ecosystem.  Effective ways of mitigating and managing such changes are crucial for human well-being, as energy and water are necessary for survival in the next century. Threats to inland biodiversity are the most significant and are likely to increase as more water is required to fulfil human demands. Furthermore, the impacts of land-based activities further degrade inland water resources. Some of the major drivers of wetland and inland water resource biodiversity degradation include habitat change, climate change, invasive alien species, and the over-exploitation of natural resources. Without the proper management of wetland and inland water resources, there will be rapid biodiversity loss, but important ecosystem services will also slowly degrade. This will conseqently lead to increased impacts on the development of humankind. Hence, addressing these issues is crucially important.

Remote sensing and earth observation play an important role in the conservation of wetland and inland water resources. Over the decades, efforts to preserve wetland and inland water resources have been hampered due to a lack of information about the the geographical location, type, and size of wetland resources. The data acquired through remote sensing and GIS can provide researchers with the information they require to adapt and modify wetland conservation techniques and strategic restoration measures. Further, bringing in more advanced remote sensing applications will help to address some important research questions such as what is the actual extent of wetlands and how has it changed over time? What are the growing impacts of urbanization, agriculture, and aquaculture on wetland and inland water resources? How can we efficiently identify the signs of water quality degradation, e.g., eutrophication and large sediment loads? How can we effectively predict the extent to which climate change and upstream water use impacts wetland ecosystems? The introduction of advances in remote sensing will significantly help to address these research questions and will assist in conserving wetland resources.

This Special Issue invites researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to explore innovative remote sensing applications for wetland and inland water resource management.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to the following:

  • Recent trends of using remote sensing applications for wetland and inland water resource management;
  • Remote sensing applications for enhancing the resilience of wetlands;
  • Remote sensing for long-term wetland identification and habitat classification;
  • Advances in remote sensing for capturing appropriate wetland vegetation parameters;
  • Advances in satellite remote sensing for water resource management;
  • Remote sensing applications for wetland conservation and management;
  • Frontiers in remote sensing for water eutrophication and the analysis of driving forces;
  • Remote sensing for capturing accurate wetland vegetation parameters;
  • Innovations in remote sensing for the analysis of the biogeochemical parameters of inland water resources;
  • Remote sensing for aquatic vegetation mapping and monitoring;
  • Remote sensing for water boundary and dynamics analysis.

Dr. Chi Lin
Prof. Dr. Chang Wu Yu
Dr. Ning Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water
  • remote sensing
  • analysis
  • aquatic vegetation mapping
  • resource management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 6966 KiB  
Article
Quantification of Evapotranspiration and Water Chemistry in a Remediated Wetland in Everglades National Park, USA
by Dillon Nicholas Reio, René M. Price, Assefa M. Melesse and Michael Ross
Water 2023, 15(4), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15040611 - 4 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1763
Abstract
Similar to most wetlands, the Florida Everglades landscape was altered to promote agriculture and human settlement, significantly altering the natural hydrologic regime. Once former agricultural land located within Everglades National Park (ENP), the Hole-in-the-Donut (HID) wetland restoration program became the first mitigation bank [...] Read more.
Similar to most wetlands, the Florida Everglades landscape was altered to promote agriculture and human settlement, significantly altering the natural hydrologic regime. Once former agricultural land located within Everglades National Park (ENP), the Hole-in-the-Donut (HID) wetland restoration program became the first mitigation bank project in Florida. The HID program utilized a restoration technique of complete soil removal to effectively eradicate an invasive plant species. This research investigated the effects of the vegetation and soil removal on the hydrologic conditions of the HID, specifically evapotranspiration and water chemistry. Annual evapotranspiration rates were determined for the region using remotely sensed data and compared to the acres restored over a 15-year period. Groundwater and surface waters were collected from both inside the HID and from adjacent areas within ENP for major cations and anions and total nutrient concentrations. Evapotranspiration rates were found to decrease from a mean of 1083.4 mm year−1 in the year 2000 to 891.6 mm year−1 in 2014 as the restored area increased to 4893 acres. Concentrations of ions and nutrients were lower in groundwater and surface water within the restored areas compared to adjacent areas. We conclude that the lack of soil cover (along with reduced evapotranspiration rates) contributed to the lower ion and nutrient concentrations in the surface water and groundwater within the HID. Full article
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18 pages, 4924 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Shoreline and Islands Change Detection with Digital Shoreline Analysis Using RS Data and GIS
by Girish Gopinath, Muhamed Fasil Chettiyam Thodi, Udayar Pillai Surendran, Pranav Prem, Jesiya Nalukudi Parambil, Abed Alataway, Ahmed A. Al-Othman, Ahmed Z. Dewidar and Mohamed A. Mattar
Water 2023, 15(2), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15020244 - 5 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3453
Abstract
This study concerned the assessment of changes in the coastline of Kavvayi beach and its nine islands in a tropical coastal wetland using remote sensing (RS) data and geographic information systems (GIS), as this sedimentary environment is still poorly characterized. The satellite data [...] Read more.
This study concerned the assessment of changes in the coastline of Kavvayi beach and its nine islands in a tropical coastal wetland using remote sensing (RS) data and geographic information systems (GIS), as this sedimentary environment is still poorly characterized. The satellite data used were from LANDSAT images (30 m spatial resolution) (MSS—volume 5, TM, ETM, and ETM+ volume 6) for the period of the last 25 years (1990 to 2014). Band 5 in Landsat (MSS) and band 6 (ETM 24- OLI) were used because they clearly distinguish the boundaries between land and water. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) was used to understand shoreline changes such as erosion and accretion processes by calculating the net shift in shoreline (NSM), end point rate (EPR), and linear regression rate (LRR) for the period of 25 years. The results showed significant changes over the studied period, leading to erosion and accretion. Coastal processes had an impact in the period from 2005 to 2014, leading to the development of a new island in the northern part of the wetland due to the construction of a new breakwater. In addition, the causes of the shoreline changes on the islands, including anomalies and the formation of new structures in the wetland, were investigated and discussed. These analyses confirmed that the islands studied were subjected to marine transgression and vice versa. Among this, Kavvayi was subject to marine transgression over the period, and Achanthurti Island showed erosion to a lesser extent. This can be considered as a feature of wetlands in combating sea level rise at local levels and possible reasons for the changes along with the coastal zone management plans were also discussed. Full article
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