Water Quality Monitoring and Public Health

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Water Quality and Contamination".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 October 2024 | Viewed by 2543

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, Josip Juraj University of Osijek, Franje Kuhaca 18, HR-31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: water quality monitoring; drinking water and wastewater treatment; adsorption; arsenic; nutrients
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change and the increase in the world population will cause increased demands for pure and safe water, and ensuring sufficient water quantities will be a demanding task for many governments worldwide and one of the biggest challenges for humankind.

The World Economic Forum ranks the water crisis in the top three global risks, while the General Assembly of the United Nations (UN) has proclaimed the period from 2018 to 2028 as the UN Water Action Decade to improve educational outreach related to water and water pollution control and to improve communication to achieve water-related goals.

For the achievement of those ambitious goals, it is necessary to constantly monitor water qualities of the surface water and groundwater, as well as drinking water, as well as to monitor the quality of effluents that have been discharged from wastewater treatment plants to the environment every day.

As the Guest Editor for this Special Issue, “Water Quality Monitoring and Public Health”, I have the honor of inviting you to publish a feature paper in Water, as a contribution to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals, especially regarding Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation.

Within this framework, for this Special Issue, I would like to invite original research contributions, review articles, as well as short communications that emphasize and give an overview of the water qualities of the surface waters, as well as groundwaters. I would also like to invite scientists and professionals who are dealing with drinking and bottled water monitoring and monitoring of other water types (swimming pool water, sea water, irrigation water, process water) that directly or indirectly significantly can affect public health to present the results of their latest research. Please feel free to reach out to me or alexandra.wang@mdpi.com should you have any questions.

Prof. Dr. Mirna Habuda-Stanic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • monitoring of water quality
  • monitoring of wastewater quality
  • pollutants occurrence
  • water pollution
  • heavy metal pollution
  • nutrients pollution
  • emerging contaminants
  • microbiology contamination
  • environmental health
  • biomonitoring of water quality
  • public health
  • surface water quality
  • groundwaters quality
  • bottled water quality
  • swimming pool water quality
  • sea water quality
  • irrigation water quality
  • process water quality

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 282 KiB  
Article
Water Intrusion: An Analysis of Water Sources, Categories, and the Degradation Science of Building Materials
by Charles R. Norman, Kaysea L. Kelley, Colton Sanner, Sam Lueck, Jon Norman and Chuck Norrow
Water 2024, 16(11), 1576; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16111576 - 31 May 2024
Viewed by 348
Abstract
Water intrusion into a building envelope describes the unwanted movement of water or vapor into a building, where it causes damage. Various factors dictate water intrusion category determination and classification. These factors include, but are not limited to, the type and degree of [...] Read more.
Water intrusion into a building envelope describes the unwanted movement of water or vapor into a building, where it causes damage. Various factors dictate water intrusion category determination and classification. These factors include, but are not limited to, the type and degree of water intrusion, the source and route of the contamination, and exposure time, as well as geographical environmental conditions. This comprehensive research paper looked at the literature and the science to explore the bases for indoor environmental professional (IEP) classification and category determination, but also the science behind the effects of water intrusion on building materials (BM). The efficacy of building materials once degradation has occurred and any accelerating effects impacting the efficiency of building materials and their loss of integrity were closely examined in terms of material microstructural and compositional changes. The damaging effects of moisture and heat on building materials are called hygrothermal damage, which compromises the properties and use of materials. Both aspects of building integrity, i.e., water intrusion and structural deterioration, should be of concern when mitigating and remediating the intrusion of moisture. Previous research on the clarification of water categories for water intrusions is lacking. Past approaches to water classification have lacked universal scientific clarity and understanding. In addition to a need to understand the effects that water category might have on building materials and their corresponding degree of degradation, more science and reviews are needed. The need for proper class and category determination for the remediation of water intrusion within buildings is the first step toward achieving correct mitigation to ensure human health and safety. The possible adverse health effects of water intrusion need focus and cohesion for the determination of categories. We know that the final determination of water categories differs according to the degree of contamination over time and the degree of a given class of water intrusion; however, what role do the route and initial water contamination play in the determination of the category? The following paper aims to provide not only a review of the science but also an elaboration of the category determination process and the degradation effects on building materials which should be considered, as well as possible avenues of scientific research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Monitoring and Public Health)
12 pages, 1163 KiB  
Article
Monitoring and Assessment of the Quality of Chlorinated Water in Schools
by Vanessa Stein, Alessandro Cazonatto Galvão, Alexandre Tadeu Paulino, Alex Molina Manfredi, Edmar Martendal, Tainara Vieira and Weber da Silva Robazza
Water 2024, 16(10), 1415; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16101415 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 565
Abstract
All water destined for human consumption must be subjected to disinfection processes via chlorination with the aim of eliminating the risk of the transmission of waterborne diseases. However, the treatment of water using this method leads to the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs), which [...] Read more.
All water destined for human consumption must be subjected to disinfection processes via chlorination with the aim of eliminating the risk of the transmission of waterborne diseases. However, the treatment of water using this method leads to the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs), which are toxic compounds that may be ingested, inhaled, or absorbed by the skin, increasing the risk of carcinogenic and mutagenic processes. High trihalomethane concentrations in water may be directly related to physicochemical properties, such as temperature, pH, hardness, and potentially toxic metal concentrations. In this work, physicochemical characterization was performed and water quality was assessed with regard to the presence of trihalomethanes in 17 samples collected from points before and after storage in reservoirs. Atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine potentially toxic metals and the measurement of physicochemical properties demonstrated that all results were in accordance with the standards established by Brazilian legislation. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of trihalomethanes in the water samples (trichloromethane, bromodichloromethane, chlorodibromomethane, and bromoform), which were also in accordance with the limits established by Brazilian legislation. Hierarchical clustering on principal components confirmed changes in the water quality depending on location. This work constitutes a paradigm for future studies on the monitoring of toxic organic compounds in water to avoid health problems in humans and animals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Monitoring and Public Health)
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12 pages, 712 KiB  
Article
Presence and Distribution of Sun-Blocking Agents in the Danube River: Implications for Aquatic Ecosystem Health
by Florinela Pirvu, Iuliana Paun, Ioana Antonia Cimpean, Luoana Florentina Pascu and Florentina Laura Chiriac
Water 2024, 16(7), 945; https://doi.org/10.3390/w16070945 - 25 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1254
Abstract
Organic sun-blocking agents are recognized as emerging pollutants of the aquatic environment. The consequences and effects of these harmful substances on aquatic organisms are not fully understood, particularly in the context of Romania. This study examines the presence and environmental hazards posed by [...] Read more.
Organic sun-blocking agents are recognized as emerging pollutants of the aquatic environment. The consequences and effects of these harmful substances on aquatic organisms are not fully understood, particularly in the context of Romania. This study examines the presence and environmental hazards posed by ten UV filters found in the Danube River. Six of the ten targeted contaminants were detected in surface water samples: 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3), 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), 2,3,4-trihydroxy benzophenone (234HBP), 2,2′-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-8), 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-4′-methyl-benzophenone (BP-10), and benzyl salicylate (BS). In sediment samples, seven of the ten compounds were identified: BS, BP-3, 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HBP), BP-1, 234HBP, 2,2′,4,4′-tetrahydroxybenzophenone (BP-2), and BP-10, with different frequencies. The correlation coefficients showed strong relationships between benzophenone derivatives in surface water samples and a common contamination source for BP-3 and BS in sediment samples. In the assessment, the risk quotient (RQ) for BP-1 in fish was determined to be 1.81. Similarly, RQ values for BP-3 were calculated as 1.24 for Daphnia magna and 57 for fish, suggesting that these UV filters could potentially present substantial hazards to the aquatic ecosystem. The study findings indicate that additional research is needed to investigate the presence and potential risks of organic sun-blocking agents in surface waters, with a particular emphasis on densely populated areas in Romania. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Monitoring and Public Health)
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