New Horizons in Myopia Management: Bridging Epidemiology and Clinical Innovation

A special issue of Vision (ISSN 2411-5150).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 2644

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Shamir Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 60930, Israel
Interests: myopia; strabismus; ocular surface

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Guest Editor
Department of Ophthalmology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem 91120, Israel
Interests: myopia; contact lenses; ocular surface
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Guest Editors of the forthcoming Special Issue on myopia, we warmly invite scholars, clinicians, and researchers to contribute original manuscripts that will enrich our collective understanding of this increasingly prevalent ocular condition. Myopia can lead to physiological changes in the eye that increase the risk of sight-threatening complications, while even non-pathological changes can detrimentally impact visual quality and an individual's overall quality of life.

Myopia can lead to irreversible visual impairment. Early detection and intervention of eye and visual disorders are particularly crucial in childhood, given the younger population's more rapid development.

The primary aim of this Special Issue is to assemble a comprehensive collection of peer-reviewed articles that explore a wide array of topics related to myopia and other visual disorders. We invite original articles or reviews focused on, but not limited to, the following potential topics: prevalence studies of myopia or other visual disorders, risk and prevention factors, treatment and control methods, approaches for detecting and measuring the risk of developing myopia or other visual disorders, the influence of myopia on visual function and overall quality of life, and ocular pathologies in childhood. We are also keen to include articles that delve into advances in diagnostic technologies and imaging techniques, the role of artificial intelligence in myopia research, and innovations in treatment modalities, including pharmacological interventions and surgical procedures.

Given the rapidly evolving landscape of myopia research, marked by significant technological advancements and a growing wealth of studies within the literature, this Special Issue aims to serve as a valuable resource for clinicians striving to keep pace with the field.
We are honored to invite contributors to submit studies.

Prof. Dr. Yair Morad
Dr. Nir Erdinest
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vision is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • myopia
  • axial length
  • myopia control
  • myopia management
  • epidemiology
  • diagnostic technologies
  • artificial intelligence
  • treatment modalities
  • risk factors
  • pathologic myopia

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 1705 KiB  
Article
An Insight into Knowledge, Perspective, and Practices of Indian Optometrists towards Childhood Myopia
by Archana Naik, Siddharth K. Karthikeyan, Jivitha Jyothi Ramesh, Shwetha Bhaskar, Chinnappa A. Ganapathi and Sayantan Biswas
Vision 2024, 8(2), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision8020022 - 16 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1451
Abstract
The current understanding of clinical approaches and barriers in managing childhood myopia among Indian optometrists is limited. This research underscores the necessity and relevance of evidence-based practice guidelines by exploring their knowledge, attitude, and practice towards childhood myopia. A self-administered internet-based 26-item survey [...] Read more.
The current understanding of clinical approaches and barriers in managing childhood myopia among Indian optometrists is limited. This research underscores the necessity and relevance of evidence-based practice guidelines by exploring their knowledge, attitude, and practice towards childhood myopia. A self-administered internet-based 26-item survey was circulated online among practicing optometrists in India. The questions assessed the demographics, knowledge, self-reported clinical practice behavior, barriers, source of information guiding their management, and extent of adult caregiver engagement for childhood myopia. Of 393 responses, a significant proportion of respondents (32.6–92.4%) were unaware of the ocular complications associated with high myopia, with less than half (46.5%) routinely performing ocular biometry in clinical practice. Despite the growing awareness of emerging myopia management options, the uptake remains generally poor, with single-vision distance full-correction spectacles (70.3%) being the most common mode of vision correction. Barriers to adopting optimal myopia care are medicolegal concerns, absence of clinical practice guidelines, and inadequate consultation time. Own clinical experience and original research articles were the primary sources of information supporting clinical practice. Most (>70%) respondents considered involving the adult caregiver in their child’s clinical decision-making process. While practitioners’ awareness and activity of newer myopia management strategies are improving, there is plenty of scope for its enhancement. The importance of evidence-based practice guidelines and continuing education on myopia control might help practitioners enhance their clinical decision-making skills. Full article
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17 pages, 2188 KiB  
Article
Enhancement of the Inner Foveal Response of Young Adults with Extended-Depth-of-Focus Contact Lens for Myopia Management
by Ana Amorim-de-Sousa, Rute J. Macedo-de-Araújo, Paulo Fernandes, José M. González-Méijome and António Queirós
Vision 2024, 8(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/vision8020019 - 14 Apr 2024
Viewed by 716
Abstract
Background: Myopia management contact lenses have been shown to successfully decrease the rate of eye elongation in children by changing the peripheral refractive profile of the retina. Despite the efforts of the scientific community, the retinal response mechanism to defocus is still unknown. [...] Read more.
Background: Myopia management contact lenses have been shown to successfully decrease the rate of eye elongation in children by changing the peripheral refractive profile of the retina. Despite the efforts of the scientific community, the retinal response mechanism to defocus is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the local electrophysiological response of the retina with a myopia control contact lens (CL) compared to a single-vision CL of the same material. Methods: The retinal electrical activity and peripheral refraction of 16 eyes (16 subjects, 27.5 ± 5.7 years, 13 females and 3 males) with myopia between −0.75 D and −6.00 D (astigmatism < 1.00 D) were assessed with two CLs (Filcon 5B): a single-vision (SV) CL and an extended-depth-of-focus (EDOF) CL used for myopia management. The peripheral refraction was assessed with an open-field WAM-5500 auto-refractometer/keratometer in four meridians separated by 45° at 2.50 m distance. The global-flash multifocal electroretinogram (gf-mfERG) was recorded with the Reti-port/scan21 (Roland Consult) using a stimulus of 61 hexagons. The implicit time (in milliseconds) and response density (RD, in nV/deg2) of the direct (DC) and induced (IC) components were used for comparison between lenses in physiological pupil conditions. Results: Although the EDOF decreased both the HCVA and the LCVA (one and two lines, respectively; p < 0.003), it still allowed a good VA. The EDOF lens induced a myopic shift in most retinal areas, with a higher and statistically significant effect on the nasal retina. No differences in the implicit times of the DC and IC components were observed between SV and EDOF. Compared with the SV, the EDOF lens showed a higher RD in the IC component in the foveal region (p = 0.032). In the remaining retinal areas, the EDOF evoked lower, non-statistically significant RD in both the DC and IC components. Conclusions: The EDOF myopia control CL enhanced the response of the inner layers of the fovea. This might suggest that, besides other mechanisms potentially involved, the central foveal retinal activity might be involved in the mechanism of myopia control with these lenses. Full article
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