Control Strategies of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens

A special issue of Veterinary Sciences (ISSN 2306-7381).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 19 July 2024 | Viewed by 9160

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratório de Biologia das Interações Celulares, Departamento de Morfologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, MG, Brazil
Interests: vaccinology; immunology; pre-clinical trial
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biological Sciences, Department of Morphology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, MG, Brazil
Interests: tick; control; diagnosis; vaccine; resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ticks are considered an important vector of pathogens, including distinct etiological agents (viruses, bacteria/rickettsioses and protozoans). Tick infestations and tick-borne diseases result in high economic impacts on animal health, promoting increased production costs in the world’s cattle and poultry industries, for example. Similarly, tick infestations in pet animals are a health threat considering the impact during the blood feeding and tickborne diseases, in addition to their role as sentinels for tick-borne infections in humans.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present approaches in control strategies considering treatment, vaccine development, repellents and measures such as strategic management for avoiding tick infestations and tick-borne pathogens. Furthermore, animal models as platforms for testing treatments and vaccines, in addition to studies on acaricide resistance, are potential topics of this Special Issue.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate continuing efforts to advance in the field of control strategies of ticks and tick-borne pathogens. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: biology of tick infestations in animal models for testing acaricides and vaccines; acaricidal analysis against ticks related to pets and animal production related to food chains; testing of new antigens and repellents for controlling ticks and tick-borne diseases; evaluation of the economic impact of ticks and tick-borne diseases in pets and production animals.

Prof. Dr. Rodolfo Cordeiro Giunchetti
Dr. Maykelin Fuentes Zaldivar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Veterinary Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tick
  • tick-borne pathogens
  • acaricide resistance
  • vaccine
  • pre-clinical trial
  • anaplasmosis
  • babesiosis
  • borreliosis
  • ehrlichiosis
  • rickettsioses
  • sheep
  • goat
  • cattle
  • dog
  • horse
  • poultry
  • tick repellents

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

12 pages, 828 KiB  
Article
Tick Diversity and Pathogen Transmission in Daejeon, Korea: Implications from Companion Animals and Walking Trails
by Jinwoo Seo, Gyurae Kim, Jeong-ah Lim, Seungho Song, Dae-Sung Yoo, Ho-Seong Cho and Yeonsu Oh
Vet. Sci. 2024, 11(2), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci11020090 - 14 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1363
Abstract
With the ongoing global warming-induced climate change, there has been a surge in vector-borne diseases, particularly tick-borne diseases (TBDs). As the population of companion animals grows, there is growing concern from a One Health perspective about the potential for these animals to spread [...] Read more.
With the ongoing global warming-induced climate change, there has been a surge in vector-borne diseases, particularly tick-borne diseases (TBDs). As the population of companion animals grows, there is growing concern from a One Health perspective about the potential for these animals to spread TBDs. In this study, ticks were collected from companion animals and the surrounding environment in Daejeon Metropolitan City, Korea, using flagging and dragging, and CO2 trap methods. These ticks were then subjected to conventional (nested) PCR for severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), Anaplasma spp., Ehrlichia spp., and Borrelia spp. We identified a total of 29,176 ticks, consisting of three genera and four species: H. longicornis, H. flava, I. nipponensis, and A. testudinarium. Notably, H. longicornis was the predominant species. The presence of A. testudinarium suggested that the species traditionally found in southern regions are migrating northward, likely as a result of climate change. Our PCR results confirmed the presence of all four pathogens in both companion animals and the surrounding environment, underscoring the potential for the indirect transmission of tick-borne pathogens to humans through companion animals. These findings emphasize the importance of the ongoing surveillance of companion animals in the management and control of TBDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control Strategies of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1766 KiB  
Article
Molecular Detection of Rickettsia hoogstraalii in Hyalomma anatolicum and Haemaphysalis sulcata: Updated Knowledge on the Epidemiology of Tick-Borne Rickettsia hoogstraalii
by Aneela Aneela, Mashal M. Almutairi, Abdulaziz Alouffi, Haroon Ahmed, Tetsuya Tanaka, Itabajara da Silva Vaz, Junior, Shun-Chung Chang, Chien-Chin Chen and Abid Ali
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(10), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10100605 - 04 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1549
Abstract
Ticks are hematophagous ectoparasites that transmit pathogens to animals and humans. Updated knowledge regarding the global epidemiology of tick-borne Rickettsia hoogstraalii is dispersed, and its molecular detection and genetic characterization are missing in Pakistan. The current study objectives were to molecularly detect and [...] Read more.
Ticks are hematophagous ectoparasites that transmit pathogens to animals and humans. Updated knowledge regarding the global epidemiology of tick-borne Rickettsia hoogstraalii is dispersed, and its molecular detection and genetic characterization are missing in Pakistan. The current study objectives were to molecularly detect and genetically characterize Rickettsia species, especially R. hoogstraalii, in hard ticks infesting livestock in Pakistan, and to provide updated knowledge regarding their global epidemiology. Ticks were collected from livestock, including goats, sheep, and cattle, in six districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) Pakistan. Overall, 183 hosts were examined, of which 134 (73.2%), including goats (number = 39/54, 72.2%), sheep (23/40, 57.5%), and cattle (71/89, 80%) were infested by 823 ticks. The most prevalent tick species was Rhipicephalus microplus (number = 283, 34.3%), followed by Hyalomma anatolicum (223, 27.0%), Rhipicephalus turanicus (122, 14.8%), Haemaphysalis sulcata (104, 12.6%), Haemaphysalis montgomeryi (66, 8.0%), and Haemaphysalis bispinosa (25, 3.03%). A subset of 210 ticks was selected and screened for Rickettsia spp. using PCR-based amplification and subsequent sequencing of rickettsial gltA and ompB fragments. The overall occurrence rate of R. hoogstraalii was 4.3% (number = 9/210). The DNA of Rickettsia was detected in Hy. anatolicum (3/35, 8.5%) and Ha. sulcata (6/49, 12.2%). However, no rickettsial DNA was detected in Rh. microplus (35), Rh. turanicus (35), Ha. montgomeryi (42), and Ha. bispinosa (14). The gltA and ompB fragments showed 99–100% identity with R. hoogstraalii and clustered phylogenetically with the corresponding species from Pakistan, Italy, Georgia, and China. R. hoogstraalii was genetically characterized for the first time in Pakistan and Hy. anatolicum globally. Further studies should be encouraged to determine the role of ticks in the maintenance and transmission of R. hoogstraalii in different hosts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control Strategies of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

6 pages, 254 KiB  
Communication
Costa Rican Genotype of Ehrlichia canis: A Current Concern
by Karla Irigaray Nogueira Borges, Nathalia de Assis Pereira, Daniel Moura de Aguiar, Isis Indaiara Gonçalves Granjeiro Taques, Bruna Samara Alves-Ribeiro, Dirceu Guilherme de Souza Ramos and Ísis Assis Braga
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(5), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10050316 - 27 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1355
Abstract
Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is endemic to Brazil, and studies have verified that dogs have been exposed to different genotypes of Ehrlichia canis. This genetic divergence can influence the clinical response of the animals. We aimed to describe clinical and hematological changes [...] Read more.
Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME) is endemic to Brazil, and studies have verified that dogs have been exposed to different genotypes of Ehrlichia canis. This genetic divergence can influence the clinical response of the animals. We aimed to describe clinical and hematological changes in 125 dogs that reacted to BrTRP36, USTRP36, and CRTRP36 genotypes through enzyme immunoassays and to highlight the current concern regarding infection by the Costa Rican genotype. The results showed that 52.0% reacted to the Brazilian genotype, 22.4% reacted to the Costa Rican genotype, and 16.0% reacted to the American genotype, and some co-reactions were observed. Dogs reactive to BrTRP36 were 1.24% more likely to present with medullary regeneration in cases of anemia and 3% less likely to manifest hyperproteinemia, while dogs reactive to CRTRP36 were 0.7% less likely to present with medullary regeneration. Febrile illness and neurological alterations were also statistically associated, with an 85.7% and 231.2% increased likelihood, respectively, to occur in dogs that reacted to USTRP36. The dogs with the American genotype developed clinical manifestations related to systemic inflammation, while those with the Brazilian genotype of E. canis were more dispersed in the region studied, showing greater adaptation to the hosts. We highlight the significant serocurrence of the Costa Rican genotype, which has already been described to have zoonotic potential and which showed less adaptation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control Strategies of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

17 pages, 1130 KiB  
Review
Advances in Non-Chemical Tools to Control Poultry Hematophagous Mites
by Geralda Gabriele da Silva, Maykelin Fuentes Zaldívar, Lucilene Aparecida Resende Oliveira, Reysla Maria da Silveira Mariano, Daniel Ferreira Lair, Renata Antunes de Souza, Alexsandro Sobreira Galdino, Miguel Angel Chávez-Fumagalli, Denise da Silveira-Lemos, Walderez Ornelas Dutra, Ricardo Nascimento Araújo, Lorena Lopes Ferreira and Rodolfo Cordeiro Giunchetti
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(10), 589; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10100589 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1655
Abstract
The blood-sucking mites Dermanyssus gallinae (“red mite”), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (“northern fowl mite”), and Ornithonyssus bursa (”tropical fowl mite”) stand out for causing infestations in commercial poultry farms worldwide, resulting in significant economic damage for producers. In addition to changes in production systems that [...] Read more.
The blood-sucking mites Dermanyssus gallinae (“red mite”), Ornithonyssus sylviarum (“northern fowl mite”), and Ornithonyssus bursa (”tropical fowl mite”) stand out for causing infestations in commercial poultry farms worldwide, resulting in significant economic damage for producers. In addition to changes in production systems that include new concerns for animal welfare, global climate change in recent years has become a major challenge in the spread of ectoparasites around the world. This review includes information regarding the main form of controlling poultry mites through the use of commercially available chemicals. In addition, non-chemical measures against blood-sucking mites were discussed such as extracts and oils from plants and seeds, entomopathogenic fungi, semiochemicals, powder such as diatomaceous earth and silica-based products, and vaccine candidates. The control of poultry mites using chemical methods that are currently used to control or eliminate them are proving to be less effective as mites develop resistance. In contrast, the products based on plant oils and extracts, powders of plant origin, fungi, and new antigens aimed at developing transmission-blocking vaccines against poultry mites provide some encouraging options for the rational control of these ectoparasites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control Strategies of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

7 pages, 436 KiB  
Brief Report
Theileria orientalis Ikeda in Cattle, Alabama, USA
by Nneka Iduu, Subarna Barua, Shollie Falkenberg, Chance Armstrong, Jenna Workman Stockler, Annie Moye, Paul H. Walz and Chengming Wang
Vet. Sci. 2023, 10(11), 638; https://doi.org/10.3390/vetsci10110638 - 30 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1986
Abstract
Theileria orientalis Ikeda genotype, a parasite causing a disease in cattle that leads to significant economic challenges in Asia, New Zealand, and Australia, has been identified in seven U.S. States since 2017. Two previously validated PCR tests for Theileria followed by DNA sequencing [...] Read more.
Theileria orientalis Ikeda genotype, a parasite causing a disease in cattle that leads to significant economic challenges in Asia, New Zealand, and Australia, has been identified in seven U.S. States since 2017. Two previously validated PCR tests for Theileria followed by DNA sequencing were performed to test blood samples collected from 219 cattle in Alabama, USA, during the period of 2022–2023. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing revealed that the MPSP gene sequences (639–660 bp) from two cattle in Lee and Mobile Counties of Alabama exhibited a 100% match with those of recognized T. orientalis Ikeda strains, and showed similarities ranging from 76% to 88% with ten other T. orientalis genotypes. A high copy number of T. orientalis Ikeda was detected in the blood of infected cattle (ALP-1: 1.7 × 105 and 1.3 × 106/mL whole blood, six months apart; ALP-2: 7.1 × 106/mL whole blood). Although the confirmed competent vector for T. orientalis Ikeda, Haemaphysalis longicornis tick, has not yet been identified in Alabama, the persistent nature of T. orientalis Ikeda infection and the detection of a high pathogen burden in seemingly healthy cattle in this study suggest that other tick species, as well as shared needles and dehorning procedures, could facilitate pathogen transmission within the herd. Continued investigations are necessary for the surveillance of T. orientalis Ikeda and Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks in Alabama and other U.S. states, along with assessing the pathogenicity of T. orientalis Ikeda infections in cattle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Control Strategies of Ticks and Tick-Borne Pathogens)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop