Improving HPV Vaccination Coverage: Current Issues, Future Prospects and Strategies

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Human Papillomavirus Vaccines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2502

Special Issue Editor

Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: epidemiology; cervical cancer; prevention; vaccines; vaccination coverage; vaccination schedule; burden of disease; risk factors; cancers; infectious disease; evidence-based medicine; meta-analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globally, cervical cancer ranks as the fourth most common cancer and fourth leading cause of cancer death in women. According to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered carcinogenic to humans, particularly for cervix uteri.

The first HPV vaccine was approved in 2006, and the latest data show a significant overall reduction in cervical cancer incidence in the cohort of vaccinated adolescents worldwide. Countries are reporting a 65–97% reduction in the occurrence of cervical cancer in the population of vaccinated women.

But disparities in cervical cancer burden will likely widen with differences in HPV vaccination coverage. According to the latest WHO data, globally in 2022 the HPV vaccination program coverage in females was 21% with the first dose and 15% with the last dose, while in males the coverage was 6% and 5%, respectively, with coverage varying more than 20-fold between WHO regions. In response to this, WHO updated recommendations for the HPV vaccination schedule.

Improving HPV vaccination coverage is essential in reducing the burden of HPV-related cancers and health inequities. The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly disrupted HPV vaccination worldwide. This Special Issue is focused on current issues, future prospects and strategies aimed at improving HPV vaccination coverage.

Dr. Irena Ilic
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • HPV vaccine
  • HPV-related cancers
  • vaccination
  • vaccine coverage
  • vaccine acceptance
  • vaccine hesitancy
  • vaccines knowledge, attitudes and practice
  • immunity
  • prevention

Published Papers (2 papers)

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10 pages, 202 KiB  
Article
Perceptions of a State-Level HPV Vaccine Mandate and Exemption Option in Rural Virginia: A Qualitative Study
by E. Marshall Brooks, Kendall Fugate-Laus, Ben Webel and Shillpa Naavaal
Vaccines 2024, 12(4), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12040401 - 10 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States; yet, despite the availability of safe and effective HPV vaccines, only half of eligible adolescents have completed the vaccine series. School-entry requirements are one proven strategy to increase vaccination [...] Read more.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States; yet, despite the availability of safe and effective HPV vaccines, only half of eligible adolescents have completed the vaccine series. School-entry requirements are one proven strategy to increase vaccination rates among children and youth and reduce the burden of HPV-related cancer. This study investigated community perceptions of an HPV vaccine school-entry mandate in Virginia and the consequences of a low threshold exemption option included in the legislation. We conducted 40 interviews with community members including 15 interviews with parents, 19 with healthcare providers, and 6 with community leaders. Interviews asked about knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes concerning the HPV vaccine and mandate. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Despite healthcare provider support for the mandate, there was widespread confusion over the school-entry policy and concern that the exemption option undermined vaccination efforts. Understanding variations in community-level perceptions and response to school-based vaccination mandates is crucial for designing effective public health strategies. Findings suggest statewide vaccination initiatives should preemptively identify low uptake areas and provide targeted information to communities. Future mandates should avoid the use of ambiguous and contradictory language in vaccine-related legislation. Full article

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23 pages, 4494 KiB  
Systematic Review
Vaccine Hesitancy among European Parents—Psychological and Social Factors Influencing the Decision to Vaccinate against HPV: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Teodora Achimaș-Cadariu, Andrei Pașca, Nicoleta-Monica Jiboc, Aida Puia and Dan Lucian Dumitrașcu
Vaccines 2024, 12(2), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines12020127 - 26 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1299
Abstract
Background: Due to low adherence to HPV vaccination programs, the European region struggles with vaccination rates lower than 30% among the targeted population. The present report investigated various socio-demographic and psychological factors influencing European parents’ hesitancy towards vaccinating their children. Methods: As of [...] Read more.
Background: Due to low adherence to HPV vaccination programs, the European region struggles with vaccination rates lower than 30% among the targeted population. The present report investigated various socio-demographic and psychological factors influencing European parents’ hesitancy towards vaccinating their children. Methods: As of September 2023, four databases were searched. After applying inclusion criteria, all articles comparing psychological and socio-demographic factors in parents who vaccinate or do not vaccinate their children were included. Results: Twenty-five primary publications met the criteria, totaling 385,460 responders, of which 311,803 want to or have already vaccinated their child, and 73,555 do not wish to do so. Immigrant and employment status, religion, age of parents and the child’s gender seemed to influence their decision to vaccinate their child. Previous experience with vaccines, perceived safety and efficacy and the mother’s previous abnormal CCS results also impacted their decision. The caregivers’ education, gender, civil status, number of children, family history of neoplasia or mother’s CCS attendance did not influence their hesitancy to vaccine. Conclusion: Multiple demographic, social, economic and psychological barriers involved in the parents’ hesitancy to vaccinate their children against the HPV virus were highlighted. Specific at-risk categories that need to be targeted with information, education and vaccination campaigns were identified. Full article
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