The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe: Theory and Observation

A special issue of Universe (ISSN 2218-1997). This special issue belongs to the section "Cosmology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1884

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Laboratory Universe and Theories, UMR 8102 CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon, France
Interests: cosmological physics; numerical cosmology; large scale structure formation; scalar-tensor and modified gravity theory; backreaction and inhomogeneous universes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Large-scale structure formation is a fundamental aspect of cosmology, covering the growth of galaxy clusters, filaments, walls and voids that shape the cosmic web. Theoretical progress, observational techniques and the increasing accumulation of data have revolutionized our understanding of large-scale structures.

This Special Issue aims to be a place of collaborative learning and to foster discussions that advance research in this dynamic field. By sharing diverse perspectives and cutting-edge research, the issue will contribute to collective knowledge and inspire new avenues of exploration in large-scale structure formation. By embracing the multidisciplinary nature of cosmology and presenting the latest theoretical and observational advances, this Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive resource for researchers.

We encourage researchers to submit papers that provide new theoretical frameworks, present new observations or offer critical analyses of existing models. Contributions that attempt to bridge the gap between theory and observation, propose innovative methodologies or explore new ideas in the study of large-scale structure formation are particularly welcome. All articles submitted will undergo rigorous evaluation by a panel of experts in cosmology.

Prof. Dr. Jean-Michel Alimi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Universe is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • cosmology
  • large-structure of the universe
  • galaxy clusters
  • cosmic voids
  • cosmic web
  • gravitational instability
  • gravity theories
  • cosmological parameters
  • dark matter
  • dark energy
  • redshift surveys
  • gravitational lensing
  • numerical cosmology
  • statistical learning
  • theory
  • observation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1262 KiB  
Article
Cosmological Inference from within the Peculiar Local Universe
by Roya Mohayaee, Mohamed Rameez and Subir Sarkar
Universe 2024, 10(5), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe10050209 - 7 May 2024
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 446
Abstract
The existence of ‘peculiar’ velocities due to the formation of cosmic structure marks a point of discord between the real universe and the usually assumed Friedmann–Lemaítre–Robertson–Walker metric, which accomodates only the smooth Hubble expansion on large scales. In the standard ΛCDM model [...] Read more.
The existence of ‘peculiar’ velocities due to the formation of cosmic structure marks a point of discord between the real universe and the usually assumed Friedmann–Lemaítre–Robertson–Walker metric, which accomodates only the smooth Hubble expansion on large scales. In the standard ΛCDM model framework, Type Ia supernovae data are routinely “corrected” for the peculiar velocities of both the observer and the supernova host galaxies relative to the cosmic rest frame, in order to infer evidence for acceleration of the expansion rate from their Hubble diagram. However, observations indicate a strong, coherent local bulk flow that continues outward without decaying out to a redshift z0.1, contrary to the ΛCDM expectation. By querying the halo catalogue of the Dark Sky Hubble-volume N-body simulation, we find that an observer placed in an unusual environment like our local universe should see correlations between supernovae in the JLA catalogue that are 2–8 times stronger than seen by a typical or Copernican observer. This accounts for our finding that peculiar velocity corrections have a large impact on the value of the cosmological constant inferred from supernova data. We also demonstrate that local universe-like observers will infer a downward biased value of the clustering parameter S8 from comparing the density and velocity fields. More realistic modelling of the peculiar local universe is thus essential for correctly interpreting cosmological data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe: Theory and Observation)
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27 pages, 389 KiB  
Article
Theoretically Motivated Dark Electromagnetism as the Origin of Relativistic Modified Newtonian Dynamics
by Felix Finster, José M. Isidro, Claudio F. Paganini and Tejinder P. Singh
Universe 2024, 10(3), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/universe10030123 - 4 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 978
Abstract
The present paper is a modest attempt to initiate the research program outlined in this abstract. We propose that general relativity and relativistic MOND (RelMOND) are analogues of broken electroweak symmetry. That is, [...] Read more.
The present paper is a modest attempt to initiate the research program outlined in this abstract. We propose that general relativity and relativistic MOND (RelMOND) are analogues of broken electroweak symmetry. That is, SU(2)R×U(1)YDEMU(1)DEM (DEM stands for dark electromagnetism), and GR is assumed to arise from the broken SU(2)R symmetry and is analogous to the weak force. RelMOND is identified with dark electromagnetism U(1)DEM, which is the remaining unbroken symmetry after the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the dark electro-grav sector SU(2)R×U(1)YDEM. This sector, as well as the electroweak sector, arises from the breaking of an E8×E8 symmetry in a recently proposed model of unification of the standard model with pre-gravitation, with the latter based on an SU(2)R gauge theory. The source charge for the dark electromagnetic force is the square root of mass, motivated by the experimental fact that the ratio of the square roots of the masses of the electron, up-quark, and down-quark is 1:2:3, which is the opposite of the ratio of their electric charges at 3:2:1. The introduction of the dark electromagnetic force helps us understand the peculiar mass ratios of the second and third generations of charged fermions. We also note that in the deep MOND regime, acceleration is proportional to the square root of mass, which motivates us to propose the relativistic U(1)DEM gauge symmetry as the origin of MOND. We explain why the dark electromagnetic force falls inversely with distance, as in MOND, rather than following the inverse square of distance. We conclude that dark electromagnetism effectively mimics cold dark matter, and the two are essentially indistinguishable in cosmological situations where CDM successfully explains observations, such as CMB anisotropies and gravitational lensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe: Theory and Observation)
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