Zebrafish Model for Environmental Health Sciences Research

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2022) | Viewed by 8160

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA
Interests: zebrafish model; developing predictive toxicological models; nanoparticles; diverse chemical libraries; flame retardants; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; environmental and molecular toxicology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of zebrafish (Danio Rerio) as a model to conduct environmental health science research has been gaining momentum in the last decade. From early adoption until now, there has been a surge in use and acceptance due to the inherent advantages of the zebrafish model, which can simultaneously utilize genetic and molecular techniques, genomics, and high throughput screening and is aligned with system biology to provide advanced environmental health science research. With these advances, we have been able to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of toxic action. The use of the zebrafish will help us understand the role of chemical exposure in human disease and the environment.

For this Special Issue, we invite high-quality original research papers, short communications, and reviews focusing on all aspects of using zebrafish as a model to understand environmental health. Areas of interest may include (but are not limited to) the use of high throughput screening, chemical exposure in zebrafish models of human diseases, monitoring and safety assessment of chemicals, and insight on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanism of actions of individuals and multigenerational effects.

Dr. Lisa Truong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zebrafish
  • environmental health
  • toxicity
  • alternative model
  • mechanism of toxic action

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3974 KiB  
Article
Systematic Evaluation of the Application of Zebrafish in Toxicology (SEAZIT): Developing a Data Analysis Pipeline for the Assessment of Developmental Toxicity with an Interlaboratory Study
by Jui-Hua Hsieh, Sue Nolte, Jon T. Hamm, Zicong Wang, Georgia K. Roberts, Charles P. Schmitt and Kristen R. Ryan
Toxics 2023, 11(5), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11050407 - 25 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1655
Abstract
The embryonic zebrafish is a useful vertebrate model for assessing the effects of substances on growth and development. However, cross-laboratory developmental toxicity outcomes can vary and reported developmental defects in zebrafish may not be directly comparable between laboratories. To address these limitations for [...] Read more.
The embryonic zebrafish is a useful vertebrate model for assessing the effects of substances on growth and development. However, cross-laboratory developmental toxicity outcomes can vary and reported developmental defects in zebrafish may not be directly comparable between laboratories. To address these limitations for gaining broader adoption of the zebrafish model for toxicological screening, we established the Systematic Evaluation of the Application of Zebrafish in Toxicology (SEAZIT) program to investigate how experimental protocol differences can influence chemical-mediated effects on developmental toxicity (i.e., mortality and the incidence of altered phenotypes). As part of SEAZIT, three laboratories were provided a common and blinded dataset (42 substances) to evaluate substance-mediated effects on developmental toxicity in the embryonic zebrafish model. To facilitate cross-laboratory comparisons, all the raw experimental data were collected, stored in a relational database, and analyzed with a uniform data analysis pipeline. Due to variances in laboratory-specific terminology for altered phenotypes, we utilized ontology terms available from the Ontology Lookup Service (OLS) for Zebrafish Phenotype to enable additional cross-laboratory comparisons. In this manuscript, we utilized data from the first phase of screening (dose range finding, DRF) to highlight the methodology associated with the development of the database and data analysis pipeline, as well as zebrafish phenotype ontology mapping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish Model for Environmental Health Sciences Research)
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14 pages, 2550 KiB  
Article
Long and Short Duration Exposures to the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Fluoxetine, Paroxetine and Sertraline at Environmentally Relevant Concentrations Lead to Adverse Effects on Zebrafish Behaviour and Reproduction
by Ananda Baskaran Venkatachalam, Bailey Levesque, John C. Achenbach, Jane J. Pappas and Lee D. Ellis
Toxics 2023, 11(2), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11020151 - 4 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2799
Abstract
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are currently the most prescribed class of psychotropic medications. Their increased global manufacture and use have become growing concerns for aquatic toxicologists and environmental biologists, who assess both the direct and indirect effects of substances on the environment [...] Read more.
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are currently the most prescribed class of psychotropic medications. Their increased global manufacture and use have become growing concerns for aquatic toxicologists and environmental biologists, who assess both the direct and indirect effects of substances on the environment and on human health. In order to assess the potential impact of environmentally relevant levels of SSRIs on fish development, behaviour and reproduction, we exposed juvenile and adult zebrafish to a select group of SSRIs using two separate exposure paradigms. In the first paradigm, juvenile zebrafish were exposed to Fluoxetine (Prozac), Paroxetine (Paxil), Sertraline (Zoloft) or a mixture of the three beginning at environmentally relevant levels (10 µg/L) for 135 days (long-term exposure) beginning at 5 days post fertilization (dpf). In the second paradigm, adult zebrafish were exposed to matching concentrations of the same SSRIs for 35 days (short-term exposure). The long-term exposure paradigm proved to have little to no overt effect on growth or development at sub-lethal concentrations (10 and 100 µg/L). However, both the stress/anxiety response (novel tank tests) and reproduction (fecundity and fertility) were dramatically reduced. Importantly, the short-term exposure of reproductively mature fish led to similar adverse effects on both the stress response and reproduction. Following both the short and long duration exposure paradigms, a 2-week washout period led to a small reduction in the adverse effects. These findings highlight the potential for SSRIs to negatively impact population dynamics in zebrafish and may be of particular value should they be found in other fish species in the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish Model for Environmental Health Sciences Research)
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13 pages, 2204 KiB  
Article
Combined Effects of Potassium Perchlorate and a Neonicotinoid on Zebrafish Larvae (Danio rerio)
by Davide Di Paola, Fabiano Capparucci, Sabrina Natale, Rosalia Crupi, Salvatore Cuzzocrea, Nunziacarla Spanò, Enrico Gugliandolo and Alessio Filippo Peritore
Toxics 2022, 10(5), 203; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10050203 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3115
Abstract
Imidacloprid (IMI) is part of the neonicotinoids family, insecticides widely used by humans and also found in wastewater. This class of compounds, if present in the environment, can cause toxicity to different species such as bees and gammarids, although little is known about [...] Read more.
Imidacloprid (IMI) is part of the neonicotinoids family, insecticides widely used by humans and also found in wastewater. This class of compounds, if present in the environment, can cause toxicity to different species such as bees and gammarids, although little is known about vertebrates such as fish. In addition, several substances have been reported in the environment that can cause damage to aquatic species, such as potassium perchlorate (KClO4), if exposed to high concentrations or for long periods. Often, the co-presence of different contaminants can cause a synergistic action in terms of toxicity to fish. In the present study, we first analyzed different concentrations of IMI (75, 100 and 150 mg/L) and KClO4 (1, 1.5 and 5 mM) to highlight the morphological effects at 96 hpf and, subsequently, chose two nontoxic concentrations to evaluate their co-exposure and the pathway involved in their co-toxicity. Morphological alteration, mucus production, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression related to intestinal function and oxidative stress were measured. These results suggest that co-exposure to IMI and KClO4 could affect zebrafish embryo development by increasing gut toxicity and the alteration of antioxidative defense mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zebrafish Model for Environmental Health Sciences Research)
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