New Technologies to Decontaminate Pollutants in Water 2.0

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Toxicity Reduction and Environmental Remediation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 3372

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Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie Chimiche, Via P. Bucci, Cubo 12C, Università della Calabria, 87036 Rende, CS, Italy
Interests: sustainable chemistry; environmental chemistry; medicinal chemistry; macromolecules
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Circular Carbon GmbH, Große Elbstrasse 86, 22767 Hamburg, Germany
Interests: biochar; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; composite materials; polymer chemistry; environmental chemistry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Industrialization is global and the impact on the environment must be monitored and minimized. Water is the most abundant substance on the Earth’s surface and one of the most influenced by contamination. Some of the most common pollutants, like pesticides or dyes, have an ionic character and, for this reason, are easily soluble in water sources. The same is true of heavy metal ions and many others. The contribution of the scientific community to the development of easy technologies to decontaminate water is fundamental because every year tons of contaminants are introduced in our lakes, rivers, seas and oceans.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue entitled “New Technologies to Decontaminate Pollutants in Water” with the aim to highlight advances in the field and create an important collection of recent discoveries about environmental chemistry.

This Special Issue is dedicated to original research articles and reviews that focus on the removal of single or multiple harmful pollutants from water. The new technologies employed may include bur are not limited to organic materials of synthetic or natural origins, like polymers, composites, renewable sources or waste. The mechanism of removal may be chemical or physical and the target pollutants can be organic or inorganic. Contaminated samples can include distilled water, freshwater or seawater. Identification and quantification of the target pollutants are recommended.

Below is a non-exhaustive list of potential research areas:

  • chemical processes to decontaminate water samples;
  • physical processes to decontaminate water samples;
  • synthesis or employment of organic materials and their applications for pollutant removal;
  • development or employment of composite materials and their applications for pollutant removal;
  • production or employment of materials derived from renewable sources for pollutant removal;
  • turning waste into sustainable bio-absorbent or bio-adsorbent for pollutants removal.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Fabrizio Olivito
Dr. Pravin Jagdale
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organic pollutants
  • inorganic pollutants
  • decontamination environmental chemistry organic materials
  • sustainable materials
  • absorption
  • adsorption identification quantification

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 23854 KiB  
Article
Water Quality Assessment and Decolourisation of Contaminated Ex-Mining Lake Water Using Bioreactor Dye-Eating Fungus (BioDeF) System: A Real Case Study
by Zarimah Mohd Hanafiah, Ammar Radzi Azmi, Wan Abd Al Qadr Imad Wan-Mohtar, Fabrizio Olivito, Giovanni Golemme, Zul Ilham, Adi Ainurzaman Jamaludin, Nadzmin Razali, Sarina Abdul Halim-Lim and Wan Hanna Melini Wan Mohtar
Toxics 2024, 12(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics12010060 - 11 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1173
Abstract
The environmental conditions of a lake are influenced by its type and various environmental forces such as water temperature, nutrients content, and longitude and latitude to which it is exposed. Due to population growth and development limits, former mining lakes are being converted [...] Read more.
The environmental conditions of a lake are influenced by its type and various environmental forces such as water temperature, nutrients content, and longitude and latitude to which it is exposed. Due to population growth and development limits, former mining lakes are being converted to more lucrative land uses like those of recreational zones, agriculture, and livestock. The fungus Ganoderma lucidum has the potential to be utilised as a substitute or to perform synergistic bacteria-coupled functions in efficient contaminated lake water treatment. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the water quality and water quality index (WQI) of an ex-mining lake named Main Lake in the Paya Indah Wetland, Selangor. Furthermore, the current work simulates the use of a Malaysian fungus in decolourising the contaminated ex-mining lake by the BioDeF system in a 300 mL jar inoculated with 10% (v/v) of pre-grown Ganoderma lucidum pellets for 48 h. According to the results, the lake water is low in pH (5.49 ± 0.1 on average), of a highly intense dark brownish colour (average reading of 874.67 ± 3.7 TCU), and high in iron (Fe) content (3.2422 ± 0.2533 mg/L). The water quality index of the lake was between 54.59 and 57.44, with an average value of 56.45; thus, the water was categorized as Class III, i.e., under-polluted water, according to the Malaysian Department of Environment Water Quality Index (DOE-WQI, DOE 2020). The batch bioreactor BioDeF system significantly reduced more than 90% of the water’s colour. The utilization of Ganoderma lucidum as an adsorbent material offers a variety of advantages, as it is easily available and cultivated, and it is not toxic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies to Decontaminate Pollutants in Water 2.0)
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Review

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25 pages, 5017 KiB  
Review
Recent Strategies for the Remediation of Textile Dyes from Wastewater: A Systematic Review
by Manikant Tripathi, Sakshi Singh, Sukriti Pathak, Jahnvi Kasaudhan, Aditi Mishra, Saroj Bala, Diksha Garg, Ranjan Singh, Pankaj Singh, Pradeep Kumar Singh, Awadhesh Kumar Shukla and Neelam Pathak
Toxics 2023, 11(11), 940; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11110940 - 19 Nov 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1726
Abstract
The presence of dye in wastewater causes substantial threats to the environment, and has negative impacts not only on human health but also on the health of other organisms that are part of the ecosystem. Because of the increase in textile manufacturing, the [...] Read more.
The presence of dye in wastewater causes substantial threats to the environment, and has negative impacts not only on human health but also on the health of other organisms that are part of the ecosystem. Because of the increase in textile manufacturing, the inhabitants of the area, along with other species, are subjected to the potentially hazardous consequences of wastewater discharge from textile and industrial manufacturing. Different types of dyes emanating from textile wastewater have adverse effects on the aquatic environment. Various methods including physical, chemical, and biological strategies are applied in order to reduce the amount of dye pollution in the environment. The development of economical, ecologically acceptable, and efficient strategies for treating dye-containing wastewater is necessary. It has been shown that microbial communities have significant potential for the remediation of hazardous dyes in an environmentally friendly manner. In order to improve the efficacy of dye remediation, numerous cutting-edge strategies, including those based on nanotechnology, microbial biosorbents, bioreactor technology, microbial fuel cells, and genetic engineering, have been utilized. This article addresses the latest developments in physical, chemical, eco-friendly biological and advanced strategies for the efficient mitigation of dye pollution in the environment, along with the related challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Technologies to Decontaminate Pollutants in Water 2.0)
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