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The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 16463

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain
Interests: spatial econometrics and geostatistics; tourism; Airbnb; hedonic prices; quality of life; gender violence; efficiency in public administration; water economy; commuting
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Guest Editor
Department Applied Economics, University of Granada, 18010 Granada, Spain
Interests: public policies and welfare; subjective wellbeing; composite indicators of social welfare; European Union cohesion policy; system responsiveness; economics of inequality; income inequality; public spending policies; deprivation and poverty
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Similar to education and health, housing is an important element which is considered to be key to promoting people’s wellbeing in advanced societies. Indeed, several studies on wellbeing have highlighted housing as one of the main domains of satisfaction. Moreover, housing prices often reflect socioeconomic status and are linked to location-based variables, such as the environment, security, and other amenities related to wellbeing. As such, public policies should consider housing policies as a priority.

The journal Sustainability invites manuscripts, including research articles, reviews, and concept papers, which study any topic relevant to the housing market and housing policy under the scope of the Welfare State. Studies can be approached from different points of view: economic, sociological, psychological, etc. For instance, the following aspects might be analyzed: urban sustainability, house prices, rent/owner home choice, labor mobility, unemployment, economic inequality, poverty, social exclusion, youth emancipation, migratory movements, social welfare, subjective well-being, housing satisfaction, etc.

Within the category of research articles, we welcome submissions involving the application of econometric and spatial modeling techniques, cross-sectional and longitudinal (panel data) studies, as well as comparative studies of different territories.

Dr. Jorge Chica-Olmo
Dr. Ángeles Sánchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wellbeing
  • real estate
  • housing economics and poverty
  • urban economics
  • gentrification
  • housing prices and amenities
  • housing market
  • pandemic and housing prices
  • pandemic and wellbeing
  • urban property and income
  • geographic information systems
  • spatial analysis

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1217 KiB  
Article
Impact of Evictions and Tourist Apartments on the Residential Rental Market in Spain
by Juan-Gabriel Gonzalez-Morales, Marina Checa-Olivas and Rafael Cano-Guervos
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7485; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137485 - 05 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2216
Abstract
In recent decades, the analysis of residential rental prices in Spain has gained increasing attention. From a socio-economic viewpoint, the increase in long-term rentals compared to new home purchases by the new generations has led researchers to examine phenomena such as the growth [...] Read more.
In recent decades, the analysis of residential rental prices in Spain has gained increasing attention. From a socio-economic viewpoint, the increase in long-term rentals compared to new home purchases by the new generations has led researchers to examine phenomena such as the growth of the tourism sector or foreclosures. This paper uses a panel data model to analyze the influence of the rate of foreclosure evictions and number of tourist apartments on residential rental prices in 50 provinces of Spain for the period 2015–2018. The results show that an increase in the number of tourist apartment vacancies increases residential rental prices, while an increase in the rate of foreclosure evictions causes residential rental prices to fall. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State)
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25 pages, 6120 KiB  
Article
Residential Property Behavior Forecasting in the Metropolitan City of Milan: Socio-Economic Characteristics as Drivers of Residential Market Value Trends
by Marzia Morena, Genny Cia, Liala Baiardi and Juan Sebastián Rodríguez Rojas
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3612; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073612 - 24 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3196
Abstract
The phenomenon of urbanization of cities has been the subject of numerous studies and evaluation protocols proposing to analyze the degree of economic and social sustainability of development projects. Through careful research and synthesis of the theoretical framework regarding residential properties’ performance measurement [...] Read more.
The phenomenon of urbanization of cities has been the subject of numerous studies and evaluation protocols proposing to analyze the degree of economic and social sustainability of development projects. Through careful research and synthesis of the theoretical framework regarding residential properties’ performance measurement and forecasting, this paper goes deeper into the proposition of property development as an asset class that represents the biggest share of the Italian property market and yet is avoided by the big portfolios. The analysis model was applied to the city of Milan and its Metropolitan Area. The method is based on the development of correlation indices to evaluate different behaviors, through time and a Geographic Information System (GIS) based on the Hedonic Price Method (HPM). Results from a hedonic model estimated for several recent years suggest that, depending on the particular view, the relation between the rent/price performance and the different external and intrinsic variables can represent a useful parameter for evaluating the feasibility of different real estate investments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State)
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14 pages, 940 KiB  
Article
The Misallocation Problem of Subsidized Housing: A Lesson from Hong Kong
by Ka Shing Cheung, Siu Kei Wong, Kwong Wing Chau and Chung Yim Yiu
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1855; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041855 - 08 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3518
Abstract
Providing affordable housing has become one of China’s key national policy agenda items. The shared-equity model in Hong Kong, implemented since the late 1970s, has assisted many families in owning a home in the public housing market. However, little attention has been paid [...] Read more.
Providing affordable housing has become one of China’s key national policy agenda items. The shared-equity model in Hong Kong, implemented since the late 1970s, has assisted many families in owning a home in the public housing market. However, little attention has been paid to their welfare after acquiring their subsidized units. This study aims to examine how shared-equity homeownership distorts residential mobility through in-kind subsidies. Panel data analysis reveals that the more in-kind subsidies owners receive, the longer they would hold on to their units in spite of spatial mismatches. Private owners, on the other hand, would trade their units without such distortion. Conceptually, the lower mobility of assisted owners could be interpreted as a new source of misallocation in Glaeser and Luttmer’s welfare analysis. Practically, this throws into question the sustainability of a subsidizing homeownership policy: does the government ultimately want assisted homeowners to move from public housing to private housing in the future (for which high mobility would be intended)? If so, new thinking on how to make in-kind subsidies transferable is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State)
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12 pages, 822 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Employment Quality and Housing Quality on Human Development in the European Union
by Marina Checa-Olivas, Bladimir de la Hoz-Rosales and Rafael Cano-Guervos
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 969; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020969 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2199
Abstract
This study aims to contribute new information on how and through which factors employment quality and housing quality can be improved from a human development approach so that people can live the life they want. Using the human capabilities approach as a theoretical [...] Read more.
This study aims to contribute new information on how and through which factors employment quality and housing quality can be improved from a human development approach so that people can live the life they want. Using the human capabilities approach as a theoretical reference framework, the article analyses the effect of involuntary part-time employment and overcrowded housing on the Human Development Index (HDI). The empirical analysis is based on the panel data technique, which is applied to data from the European Statistical Office (Eurostat) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) for the 28 member countries of the European Union. The results shed new evidence on how involuntary part-time work and overcrowded housing limit or hinder people from living the lives they want, at least in the dimensions measured by the HDI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State)
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17 pages, 1615 KiB  
Article
Respondent-Driven Sampling for Surveying Ethnic Minorities in Ecuador
by Héctor Mullo, Ismael Sánchez-Borrego and Sara Pasadas-del-Amo
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9102; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219102 - 01 Nov 2020
Viewed by 2058
Abstract
In this work, we consider the problem of surveying a population of young Indigenous, Montubios and Afro-Ecuadorians to study their living conditions and socioeconomic issues. We conducted a Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey in the canton of Riobamba, Ecuador. RDS is a network-based sampling [...] Read more.
In this work, we consider the problem of surveying a population of young Indigenous, Montubios and Afro-Ecuadorians to study their living conditions and socioeconomic issues. We conducted a Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey in the canton of Riobamba, Ecuador. RDS is a network-based sampling method intended to survey hidden or hard-to-reach populations. We have obtained RDS estimates and confidence intervals of these characteristics. We have illustrated and discussed some of the assumptions of the method using some available diagnostic tools. Our results suggest that RDS is an effective methodology for studying social and economic issues of this ethnic minority in Ecuador. This technique is relatively easy to implement and has the potential to be applied to survey other hidden populations in other settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State)
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17 pages, 438 KiB  
Article
Expenditure Decentralization: Does It Make Us Happier? An Empirical Analysis Using a Panel of Countries
by Leonardo E. Letelier-S and José L. Sáez-Lozano
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7236; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187236 - 04 Sep 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1903
Abstract
This paper analyzes whether fiscal decentralization of education, health, housing, social protection, recreation, culture and religion, public order and safety, and transportation have a significant effect on individual well-being. The empirical analysis is based on a non-linear hierarchical model that combines individual data [...] Read more.
This paper analyzes whether fiscal decentralization of education, health, housing, social protection, recreation, culture and religion, public order and safety, and transportation have a significant effect on individual well-being. The empirical analysis is based on a non-linear hierarchical model that combines individual data (level 1) with country-level data (level 2). We match 89,584 observations from the World Value Service and the European Value Service (various years) with the average value of data recorded for 30 countries by the Government Financial Statistics (IMF). While fiscal decentralization in education and housing appears to have a negative effect on well-being, this effect is positive in the cases of health and culture and recreation. We interpret this as evidence in favor of a “selective” decentralization approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Sustainability of the Housing Market and the Welfare State)
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